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U.K. payroll figures show that bosses' salaries rose 10 percent, but worker salaries only increased by 2 percent. Is there something wrong with the system?

U.K. payroll figures show that bosses' salaries rose 10 percent, but worker salaries only increased by 2 percent. Is there something wrong with the system?
  • Workers need a living salary

    I do believe there is something wrong with the system if bosses' salaries are being raised by 10% and workers are only receiving a 2% raise. Workers deserve a living wage. If workers are unable to live on the salary they're making then it definitely needs to be raised more than 2% even if that means their bosses' salaries take a cut. Once a living wage has been established then raises can be given out as incentives to work harder and better.

  • Yes, terribly wrong.

    Worker salary increases should mirror salary increases for “bosses.” After all, the workers have the same bills and expenses that the bosses have. They have the same families and offspring that they need to support that the bosses have. A difference in annual salary between a "boss" and an employee is fine, but the annual increase percentage should be equal.

  • Yes, but not because of this

    The entire world economy is suffering from the ill-effects of centralized banking, in which countries simply print up (usually digitally) the money that they need and hand it over to the banks. Of course the people who get that money first get the most use out of it. To fix the system we need to have sound money, not a house of cards that is waiting to collapse.

  • Wages raised for the privileged elite.

    As wages are raised for upper management, the general working man is scraping by to work harder for less reward. These wage raises are not following the change in the general cost of living, so the typical working class citizen will only see their check needing to stretch further with less reward.

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