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US electoral college: Does the electoral college favor Republicans?

  • Great Plain states & Bible Belt States

    Republicans win the bible belt and plain states automatically pretty much due heave religious believe in the south. Anti Gay, Anti abortion, and pro gun rules. Democratic votes does not even matter when it comes to presidential elections. I live in Texas. I have not seen single democratic rally here.

  • Yes, but only very slightly so.

    In comparison to the popular vote, the Electoral College gives Republicans a slight advantage. Usually, the Electoral College sides with the popular vote, but in the event that it doesn't, it likely will go Republican. The reason for this is that Democratic voters are more concentrated and thus underrepresented. This has happened two times in the last seven elections: from 1992-2016 it happened in 2000 and 2016.

    If you look at the electoral margins in recent years, you may notice that Democrats have a large lead. This may make the Electoral College seem like it favors Democrats. However, it does not; the Electoral College instead gives the winner a much larger margin of victory than their popular vote (usually) win. As Democrats have been winning many of the recent elections, the Electoral College gave them more votes overall. The republicans won the popular vote 1/7 times, but won the presidency 3/7 times.

    Many people will also tell you that the Electoral College actually favors swing states, not either party. While the Electoral College certainly gives swing states much more attention, it also favors Republicans, as established earlier.

  • Yes it does, but very mildly.

    Compared to the popular vote, the Electoral College favors Republicans. In the last seven elections, a split vote has occurred twice, and each time the Democrats won the popular vote, whereas the Republicans won the Electoral vote. The reason for this split is that Democratic voters are more concentrated, and are thus underrepresented. In the event of a close race, it's very possible that the popular and Electoral vote are split, and when it does happen, the Republicans will likely benefit. However, most of the time, the Electoral College sides with the popular vote, and so is fair to both parties. The only skewing it usually does is to make the winner of the popular vote win the Electoral vote by larger margins.

  • History and numbers don't lie

    It's a very simple answer.

    How many times has a Democrat won the popular vote but a Republican wins the electoral vote: 5

    How many times has a Republican won the popular vote but a Democrat wins the electoral vote: 0

    Not sure why there's a debate still going. I find no reasonable arguments to the contrary.

  • History and numbers don't lie

    It's a very simple answer.

    How many times has a Democrat won the popular vote but a Republican wins the electoral vote: 5

    How many times has a Republican won the popular vote but a Democrat wins the electoral vote: 0

    Not sure why there's a debate still going. I find no reasonable arguments to the contrary.

  • EC Historically Favors Republicans

    Every single time the Electoral College has elected for president a candidate who did NOT win the popular vote, it was a Republican candidate put into the office of POTUS by the EC. Every. Single. Time.
    1824, John Quincy Adams vs Andrew Jackson (although that one was a bit more complicated and the decision was made by the House of Representatives)
    1876, Rutherford B. Hayes vs Samuel J. Tilden
    1888, Benjamin Harrison vs Grover Cleveland
    2000, George W. Bush vs Al Gore
    2016 Donald Trump vs Hillary Clinton

  • A vote in a smaller state has a much higher value than a vote in a largely populated state.

    In a state like North Dakota, which has a population of approximately 738,000 and has 3 electors, one elector represents around 250,000 people. Whereas California has a population of 38.8 million people and only 55 electors. Because of this, a single elector represents around 750,000 people. This means that if you live in North Dakota, your vote has three times more value. Due to Republicans tending to live in smaller states with a lower population while democrats live in high populated areas like California and New York, one republican in one of the smaller states has a vote that has around the same influence as three democrats voting in California. Due to this, FOUR times a democrat has gotten more votes yet didn't win the electoral college. It happened in 1876 with Samuel Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes, in 1888 with Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison, in 2000 with Al Gore and George Bush, and in 2016 with Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Yet it has NEVER happened where a Republican won the popular vote and a Democrat won the electoral college.

  • Push for Change

    I mean the Electoral College conceding to the popular vote! It's not completely over and they can make it right by changing their votes in December. Not just minorities, women, and LGBT communities are at risk; but the nation as a whole! Protests might just be the beginning of the revolt.

  • States with lower populations given more power. Each state regardless of population gets two electoral votes, just for being a state.

    Each state regardless of population gets two electoral votes, just for being a state. So whether a state has a 1,000,000 people or 10, it gets two votes. States with with mostly rural areas vote republican. So 100 of the electoral votes have nothing to do with the population of the United States, and is not tied to receiving and number of votes.

    So far twice this century a republican has become president without winning the majority of votes.

  • Young People are discouraged

    Who supports democrats the most? Young people and Minorities. Young People are easily discouraged when it comes to voting. The idea that "My vote does not matter" is caused by the electoral college. We can see that countries that do not have an electoral college (EVERY OTHER DEMOCRACY) have a much higher voter turn out. Just remember, the electoral college was created by rich white men so that rich white men could stay in power.

  • It Does Not Favor Republicans

    The electoral college may look like it favors Republicans because most of the electoral map is red on election nights, but those areas are not as densely populated as the blue ones. States like California and New York side with Democrats because of the large urban centers, therefore giving them more of the total electorate.

  • At first glance, you might think so.

    People may tell you that democrats have won the popular vote 4/5 times and the presidency 2/5 times due to the electoral college, thus the electoral college benefits Republicans. However, they're missing something important.

    First of all, 2000. Al Gore won the popular vote, but did he really lose the electoral college? Florida was not decided by the votes, and there is a good chance Al Gore actually should have won Florida and thus the election.

    More importantly, it's true that the electoral college has twice skewed the elections to Republicans. However, this is ignoring three races where the electoral college benefited the Democrats. If the 2004-2012 races had both candidates equal in the popular vote, the electoral college gives the win to the Democrats! The reason the electoral college gave the Republicans more wins than the Democrats is that the times Democrats benefited, it wasn't enough too swing the election, with the reverse not being true.

    The electoral college can benefit both parties. Democrats usually enjoy a structural advantage, with just enough votes distributed in the Rust belt states, to gain an advantage. However, we happened to have two close elections, and those times, the electoral college happened to favor the Republicans.

  • At first glance, you might think so.

    People may tell you that democrats have won the popular vote 4/5 times and the presidency 2/5 times due to the electoral college, thus the electoral college benefits Republicans. However, they're missing something important.

    First of all, 2000. Al Gore won the popular vote, but did he really lose the electoral college? Florida was not decided by the votes, and there is a good chance Al Gore actually should have won Florida and thus the election.

    More importantly, it's true that the electoral college has twice skewed the elections to Republicans. However, this is ignoring three races where the electoral college benefited the Democrats. If the 2004-2012 races had both candidates equal in the popular vote, the electoral college gives the win to the Democrats! The reason the electoral college gave the Republicans more wins than the Democrats is that the times Democrats benefited, it wasn't enough too swing the election, with the reverse not being true.

    The electoral college can benefit both parties. Democrats usually enjoy a structural advantage, with just enough votes distributed in the Rust belt states, to gain an advantage. However, we happened to have two close elections, and those times, the electoral college happened to favor the Republicans.

  • It only favors battleground states

    The electoral college does not favor one party over another (unless you count the Democrats and Republicans as a single party, since it ensures that third parties have no chance of winning).

    What it favors is the battleground states, since those are the only ones that can be swung by campaign promises. The only reason politicians visit New York or Utah is to pick up their paychecks, then they go and spend them in Florida and Ohio.

  • It doesn't favor Republicans

    It doesn't favor Republicans if they live in Democrat states. For example I live in MA, if I vote Republican my vote is worthless. But it also works the other way around in Democrat state. It is unfair and the electoral college should be abolished! Now, not later, now! Ron Paul 2016

  • The Electoral College Favors Swing States

    The electoral college does not favor one political party over the other. Instead, it favors voters in a few key swing states. From a statistical perspective, voters in Ohio and Florida largely control the outcome of presidential elections. This disproportionate impact is unfair to the rest of the country and permits those two states to receive political favors the rest of us don't get.


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