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Was Woodrow Wilson correct in passing the Espionage and Sedition Acts during World War I? Should Americans be willing to sacrifice rights during wartime?

Asked by: MrKline
Was Woodrow Wilson correct in passing the Espionage and Sedition Acts during World War I? Should Americans be willing to sacrifice rights during wartime?
  • If you love your country...

    Woodrow Wilson was correct with the passing of the Espionage and Sedition Acts. The Espionage Act helped prevent treason or spies that would have let Americas’ weakness exposed and the Sedition Act helped by only having support in the war and to fight in it. Americans should not have issues with rights taken away during wartime. Rights taken away during a war are better than having America losing a war.

  • If your argument is so good, you don't need to shut out the dissenters.

    Ironic how the sedition act made it illegal to criticize the US Constitution, when the Constitution supported freedom of speech. The espionage and sedition acts were wrong because they did not leave room for debate. Funny how the Wilson was making "the world safe for democracy" by drafting anti war Americans (involuntary servitude), instituting a direct income tax, and fining individuals who spoke put about government tyranny tens of thousands of dollars and threatening the possibility of 20 or more years in jail for exercising ones freedom of speech. They say history will repeat itself if we don't pay attention. Well just look: conflict==>media propaganda==>no declaration of war==>war==>restriction on freedom==>nullified constitution. Rinse and repeat.

  • Dissent is patriotic.

    No one should forfeit their rights. People have the right to believe and do whatever they want if they are not hurting anyone. Liberty for all, or liberty not at all. Random word filler here for goodness sake my debating friends on this website that I love with all of my heart.

  • A One-Sided Fight for Restricted Freedom

    I do not believe that Woodrow Wilson should have passed the Espionage and Sedition Acts within the light of imprisonment. These acts allowed the government to manipulate public opinion to whatever they pleased. Citizens of America at the time of WWI were not very well-informed, let alone supporting the idea of joining a war in Europe. With these acts, they shut out any opposition of joining the war. If the government did not want to join WWII after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, they could have brought the Espionage and Sedition Acts up again in order to quell patriotism for those that died in Hawaii.


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