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Were the Luddites justified in their protests against the Industrial Revolution?

  • Yes they were successful

    Yes they were successful because to be honest, i have watched Horrible Histories and they way they tell the story, do not make the Luddites or any other gangs look like the bad guys, just men fighting for their rights during the Industrial Revolution. It is told that the Luddites were forced to make an Oath by Thomas Broughtan, founder of the Luddites and that is in the hat! They know exactly what their rights were and alot of them were killed for fighting for them and then the didnt kill a soul. Who figured that? This is an exact revolutionary statement of the exact revolutionary people who fought on the circumstances of death and unemployment. But whom told? Of course, Thomas Broughtan. It was him! But no it wan't some say?

  • Right fight but wrong side of change

    Its pretty straightforward, capitalism doesnt care about people - it is a system without a moral or humane dimension. Therefore the Luddites were right to force a human story into an economic and abstract narrative of progress. A system that tramples on communities and real peoples lives is not sustainable or desirable. Unfortunately for the Luddites, capitalism was ascendent and they were urinating in the wind. Epic forces forces that unfold like capitalism and industrialisation are stronger than small groups of resistors when they are have momentum and the full scale of their setbacks are unkown. With hindsight though, the Luddites were just the first in a group of people that cried out for a different, more social and natural world.

  • Yes they had a right to protest

    The Luddites had every right to protest the Industrial Revolution. They had a way of life that they new that was now being put in jeopardy by the Industrial Revolution. The only thing they knew how to do was protest it. As long as they were peaceful they were justified.

  • Yes

    I believe the question asks 'Were the Luddites justified', not 'has history justified the Luddites protesting'? Subsequently, I would say, yes, the Luddites were justified in their protest against the Industrial revolution. Any people group is justified in protesting against any mainstream movement which threatens to destroy their way way of life/moral views. History has shown the Luddites to be accurate in some of their predictions of the consequences of the Industrial Revolution, and inaccurate in others. But whatever the outcome, such a substantial change as the Industrial Revolution warranted protests by groups such as the Luddites.

  • YES

    You know, this is going to be controversial because the Industrial Revolution has brought a lot of prosperity in terms of disease reduction and things like vaccines, but I'm going to say that they absolutely were justified.

    Look at what we have going on in the world today. We live in a world that is basically a thinly veiled form of feudalism, and it is actually worse than feudalism in some ways.

    The Industrial Revolution made it to where many people who were appreciated before for their skills just became any other rank and file slave for the factory owners. This tradition has continued, and for all the diseases that we have cured through the Industrial Revolution, we have more to take their place.

  • No-the Luddites were not justified.

    The Luddites mostly consisted of lower-class –low-wage textile workers who were opposed to the new inventions that sped up cloth production, as well as the factories that were being built to accommodate them. The stocking frame, the spinning frame and the power loom were among the inventions to which the Luddites were opposed. The main reason to their opposition was that most of them were now out of work due to the increased efficiency of the machines. Their solution to the problem was to form a group and destroy factories across England, mainly in areas near Nottinghamshire and Lancashire. The Luddite movement started on the 11th of March in 1811, in Nottingham, and spread rapidly throughout Europe over the next few years. The principal objection of the Luddites was the automatic looms, which did not require any skilled labor. The Luddites would meet on moors outside of industrial towns, and then go in and start the destruction. Most of what they did consisted of smashing machines such as the power loom, and the stocking frame, sending death threats to inventors and destroying their new inventions. The Luddites destroyed Heathcote’s lacemaking machine in 1816. The last major Luddite movement was the Pentrich Rising, in 1817, led by the ex-Luddite Jeremiah Brandreth.

  • The Luddites were not justified

    The Luddites mostly consisted of lower-class –low-wage textile workers who were opposed to the new inventions that sped up cloth production, as well as the factories that were being built to accommodate them. The stocking frame, the spinning frame and the power loom were among the inventions to which the Luddites were opposed. The main reason to their opposition was that most of them were now out of work due to the increased efficiency of the machines. Their solution to the problem was to form a group and destroy factories across England, mainly in areas near Nottinghamshire and Lancashire. The Luddite movement started on the 11th of March in 1811, in Nottingham, and spread rapidly throughout Europe over the next few years. The principal objection of the Luddites was the automatic looms, which did not require any skilled labor. The Luddites would meet on moors outside of industrial towns, and then go in and start the destruction. Most of what they did consisted of smashing machines such as the power loom, and the stocking frame, sending death threats to inventors and destroying their new inventions. The Luddites destroyed Heathcote’s lacemaking machine in 1816. The last major Luddite movement was the Pentrich Rising, in 1817, led by the ex-Luddite Jeremiah Brandreth.

  • No, They Were Not

    The Luddites, in essence, were against technological progress. Arguing against progress is rarely justified. The Luddites formed a massive movement, often employing violent tactics, all because society was changing to incorporate more machinery to do jobs more efficiently. The Luddites would have been more justified had they tried to change the system in a more productive way or shown another avenue that could produce similar results.

  • Progress moves forward always

    The Luddites weren't justified in their protests simply because protesting does nothing in the face of technological progress. Seeing the boom then should have told them as much. If they wanted to combat what they saw as a threat, they should have found a way to change those things within the system that they didn't care for. Fighting an idea like industrialization is like fighting terrorism. Attacking ideas never works.


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