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What is the "inner" seat of the bus? The one closest to the window (Yes)? Or aisle (No)?

Asked by: Alvoria
  • East Coast is the best coast.

    Clearly the window seat is the inside seat. If you have to climb past somebody to get out, you are on the inside. But the theory of how the alternative argument developed is fairly sound. FACT. West coast people disproportionately believe in the false orientation. FACT. West coast people disproportionately support Al Qaida and Hitler. FACT. West coast people are using terrorist tactics to stop this so called "climate change", which has been demonstrated to prevent Holocaust Denial. In summary, the opposition hates freedom and are a bunch of self-hating commies.

  • Inside seat is window seat

    A claustrophobic person would assumingly take the outside seat given the choice between inside and outside seat. Given the choice between window and aisle seat he would obviously take aisle. Ergo the aisle seat is the outside seat and the window seat is the inside seat. Out (OUTside) is three letters, triangles have 3 sides (outSIDE), Illuminati confirmed.

  • You are surrounded by things, therefore inside

    If you have to climb over someone to get out, you are on the inside. If you are surrounded by a person and a window, then you are inside. If you can exit first, you are on the outside. I don't think that this is particularly complicated, but I guess west coast ppl are a little slower...

  • Inside the seat

    When sitting inside a bus everything is the inside seat, so we need to examine the individual seats and how it affects the sitter. The person who sits near the window is blocked from the aisle, so they are inside the sitting area while the person near the aisle is closest to the outside of the sitting area because they can easily leave the seat by going to the aisle while the person next to the window is blocked from the aisle unless the other person leaves or moves. It could be argued that the window provides an escape, but the aisle leads to the intented exit (the door). So, when sitting in a bus seat the person near the aisle has more control of space (the aisle), and is therefore the most outside of the seat, making the window seat the inside seat.

  • Inner circle inner seat

    The inside of the bus compared to the outside of the bus. If I am at the window seat I am closest to the outside and therefore I am on the outter seat. Conversely, the closer to the center of the bus I am in the inner seat. Got it

  • Inner circle inner seat

    The inside of the bus compared to the outside of the bus. If I am at the window seat I am closest to the outside and therefore I am on the outter seat. Conversely, the closer to the center of the bus I am in the inner seat. Got it

  • In the Bus

    The aisle is closer to the center of the inside of the bus, so this would be the farthest location(seat) from the outside of the bus. For example, if a dot was marked in the middle of a square, it would be on the inside, correct? This is why no, the window seat is not the inside seat on the bus.


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