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Whatsapp backdoor allows snooping on encrypted messages: Should this backdoor be fixed?

  • My business is my business

    This is very disturbing...My privacy is my business not anyone else...This needs to be fixed if this is happening. It is my right to be private... If you are so interested about someones life then go to those that like to share their lives, but if I select private then do not encrypt my messages to get your own satisfaction of knowing about my life.

  • My business is my business

    This is very disturbing...My privacy is my business not anyone else...This needs to be fixed if this is happening. It is my right to be private... If you are so interested about someones life then go to those that like to share their lives, but if I select private then do not encrypt my messages to get your own satisfaction of knowing about my life.

  • Yes, it should be fixed.

    Whatsapp should fix the backdoor that allows snoopers to read encrypted messages. Whatsapp users should have the security of knowing their messages are private. Furthermore, a major hacking scandal could jeopardize the future of the company. If user accounts are compromised, they may not want to use Whatsapp in the future.

  • Whatsapp vulnerability leaves users at risk

    The simple backdoor vulnerability of Whatsapp is widely known and can be exploited by hackers to gain personal information about the app's users. Whatsapp must fix the backdoor immediately if it wished to be taken seriously as a social media app and have longevity as a company. Otherwise it will soon go away.

  • Yes, I think so.

    Unlike most of Facebook’s other messaging and social media services, this backdoor is unlikely to ever be used for profiling for advertising purposes. The burden to execute the interception of messages is likely too high to be cost effective. But the same cannot be said for government agencies and actors. A backdoor into a supposedly secure, end-to-end encrypted, private messaging service could be a “goldmine” for surveillance purposes and is “a huge betrayal of user trust”, according to privacy advocates.
    The amount of private information sent knowingly or unknowingly through WhatsApp could be vast and therefore is a very attractive target for surveillance.

  • Yes, otherwise there is no protection.

    If a backdoor exists for encrypted messages to be spied on and viewed by a third party, than the whole effort to and point behind encrypting messages is moot. It denotes the whole notion of a private message. No one is really naive enough anymore to think we are not spied on in America, but if their is a publicly known avenue for it, it should be fixed.

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