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Why are humans the only living beings that have to pay money to live on this earth?

Asked by: 3rd_EyE
  • Yes every living animal pays

    All though every living thing may pretty much pay to live on this earth with their life, but the thing is why are humans the ones that have to pay actual money which its value is set by someone. Also countries are in so much debt, but to who exactly.

  • Yes yes yea

    I think yup ...... .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . .. . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . .. . ..

  • You don't pay to live on earth.

    You pay to be a part of a society or community. You can do exactly what jaksunmadness said and go live in the boonies and pay diddly squat for taxes and such, and you can hunt and forage, build your own shelter, handle your own waste product, build fires to cook your own food, and no one will come after you for a penny.

  • No you don't have to

    Just go live in the forest, eat pinecones and drink from the lake. The only downside is you won't have any internet, car or grocery. You're only talking about how it pays to have to live in a civilized state but of course there are locations where people that live in their own mud or tree houses and live off the land

  • Question needs to be rephrased.

    For a yes or no answer, the question as stated makes no sense.

    To answer it as asked, the "why" comes from money being a human deal, not something that other species conceptualize and put into practice. Not that the notion of value has no application within other species - chimpanzee societies, for example, have some complex expectations of behavior, moral codes, etc. Yet not "money," per se.

  • I think he is a bad man

    What is Money? Money is primarily a medium of exchange or means of exchange. It is a way for a person to trade what he has for what he wants. Ideal money has three critical characteristics: it acts as a medium of exchange; it is an economic good; and it is a means of economic calculation.

    Medium of Exchange

    To properly understand money as a medium of exchange one must first go back to the first methods of trade. Before money was invented one would have to engage in direct barter. A farmer who produced grain – but wanted shoes for his family – would have to find someone who, a) had shoes and, b) wanted grain. You can imagine the difficulty involved in finding that perfect someone who had what the farmer wanted and wanted what the farmer had.

    Out of necessity, this gave rise to indirect barter. Continuing with our example above, let’s assume that the farmer found a shoemaker but discovered that the shoemaker did not want grain – he wanted candlesticks. While having a drink at the local pub he overheard the gentleman next to him lamenting that he needed grain in exchange for his candlesticks. Naturally, the farmer traded his grain for the candlesticks and went back to the shoemaker and traded the candlesticks for shoes. In this example, the farmer performed indirect barter when he used the candlesticks as a medium of exchange.

    Economic Good

    Over time, different commodities served as medium of exchange but the problem of marketability and durability came into play. A necessary and highly exchangeable commodity was food. The problem is that it was perishable. One had to either use it or trade it before it went bad. Over time, the most marketable and durable commodities came to be used as medium of exchange – commodities such as gold and silver. Since gold and silver did not rust nor rot they were ideal economic goods. Over time they became the preferred medium of exchange.

    Economic Calculation

    Money is an expression of exchange value (the exchange values placed on goods by traders in the marketplace). In our examples above, it was extremely inefficient to express the exchange value of goods in units of sacks of grain, shoes, or candlesticks. Out of necessity the market gravitated toward the use of the exchange value of fixed weights of gold and silver. As an example, the original U.S. Silver Dollar was modeled after the Spanish Dollar which had a specific weight of silver (371 4/16th grains of pure silver or 416 grains of standard silver). A simple method of economic calculation consisting of weights and measures greatly improves trade and fosters economic growth.

    If we consider money as a medium of exchange then all living organism in the planet earth are actively involved in this constant exchange to be alive.
    The end

  • Functions of Money and how all living organism are actively involved in these functions.

    In Money and the Mechanism of Exchange (1875), William Stanley Jevons famously analyzed money in terms of four functions: a medium of exchange, a common measure of value (or unit of account), a standard of value (or standard of deferred payment), and a store of value. By 1919, Jevons's four functions of money were summarized in the couplet:

    Money's a matter of functions four,A Medium, a Measure, a Standard, a Store.

    This couplet would later become widely popular in macroeconomics textbooks. Most modern textbooks now list only three functions, that of medium of exchange, unit of account, and store of value, not considering a standard of deferred payment as it is a distinguished function, but rather subsuming it in the others.

    There have been many historical disputes regarding the combination of money's functions, some arguing that they need more separation and that a single unit is insufficient to deal with them all. One of these arguments is that the role of money as a medium of exchange is in conflict with its role as a store of value: its role as a store of value requires holding it without spending, whereas its role as a medium of exchange requires it to circulate. Others argue that storing of value is just deferral of the exchange, but does not diminish the fact that money is a medium of exchange that can be transported both across space and time. The term "financial capital" is a more general and inclusive term for all liquid instruments, whether or not they are a uniformly recognized tender.

  • What is Money?

    Money is primarily a medium of exchange or means of exchange. It is a way for a person to trade what he has for what he wants. Ideal money has three critical characteristics: it acts as a medium of exchange; it is an economic good; and it is a means of economic calculation.

    Medium of Exchange

    To properly understand money as a medium of exchange one must first go back to the first methods of trade. Before money was invented one would have to engage in direct barter. A farmer who produced grain – but wanted shoes for his family – would have to find someone who, a) had shoes and, b) wanted grain. You can imagine the difficulty involved in finding that perfect someone who had what the farmer wanted and wanted what the farmer had.

    Out of necessity, this gave rise to indirect barter. Continuing with our example above, let’s assume that the farmer found a shoemaker but discovered that the shoemaker did not want grain – he wanted candlesticks. While having a drink at the local pub he overheard the gentleman next to him lamenting that he needed grain in exchange for his candlesticks. Naturally, the farmer traded his grain for the candlesticks and went back to the shoemaker and traded the candlesticks for shoes. In this example, the farmer performed indirect barter when he used the candlesticks as a medium of exchange.

    Economic Good

    Over time, different commodities served as medium of exchange but the problem of marketability and durability came into play. A necessary and highly exchangeable commodity was food. The problem is that it was perishable. One had to either use it or trade it before it went bad. Over time, the most marketable and durable commodities came to be used as medium of exchange – commodities such as gold and silver. Since gold and silver did not rust nor rot they were ideal economic goods. Over time they became the preferred medium of exchange.

    Economic Calculation

    Money is an expression of exchange value (the exchange values placed on goods by traders in the marketplace). In our examples above, it was extremely inefficient to express the exchange value of goods in units of sacks of grain, shoes, or candlesticks. Out of necessity the market gravitated toward the use of the exchange value of fixed weights of gold and silver. As an example, the original U.S. Silver Dollar was modeled after the Spanish Dollar which had a specific weight of silver (371 4/16th grains of pure silver or 416 grains of standard silver). A simple method of economic calculation consisting of weights and measures greatly improves trade and fosters economic growth.

    If we consider money as a medium of exchange then all living organism in the planet earth are actively involved in this constant exchange to be alive.

  • What Is Money And How Is It Created?

    These should be two of the easiest questions to answer in economics; after all, money is the one thing that we all use in an economy—surely we know what it is, and where it comes from? Unfortunately, we know what money is the same way the fabled Blind Men of Hindustan know what an elephant is: the one who grabbed the trunk knows it is “like a tree”, while the one who grabbed the tusk knows that it is “like a spear”, and so on. Money is such a multi-faceted and all-pervasive element of our system—the figurative “elephant in the living room”—that our capability to obsess about one aspect of it prevents us developing a proper appreciation of what it actually is.

    Not knowing what it is, we develop “creation myths” about where it came from as well—and then we clash with each other over them, like a bands of rival religious zealots. At one extreme, you get people like Paul Rosenberg who argue that our monetary system is based on fraud.

    Can you and I write checks “drawn on ourselves”? Of course not. We have to back them up with value. The Fed does not. So, the mighty US dollar is not backed by gold or silver or anything at all; it’s simply an accounting trick.

    At the other extreme, you get mainstream economists like Paul Krugman, who argue that how money is created is no big deal, and that it’s in fact OK to ignore money when modelling the economy.

    There’s a bit of sleight of hand involved in the way we handle money itself: first acknowledge that it’s a special sort of good that people desire only because other people desire it, then ignore that specialness for the rest of the analysis.

    They’re both wrong, and for the same reason: they haven’t worked out what money really is. Only one person ever really ever did—and no, it wasn’t Ayn Rand. It was Augusto Graziani, an Italian Professor of Economics, who died early last year. He understood what money is because he posed and correctly answered a simple question: how does a monetary economy differ from one in which trade occurs by barter?

    This ruled out gold being money, since gold is a commodity that anyone can produce for themselves with a bit of mining (and a lot of luck). So even though gold is really special and incredibly rare, it is in the end, a commodity: an economy using gold for trade is really a barter economy, not a monetary one. As Graziani put it:

    A true monetary economy is inconsistent with the presence of a commodity money. A commodity money is by definition a kind of money that any producer can produce for himself. But an economy using as money a commodity coming out of a regular process of production, cannot be distinguished from a barter economy. A true monetary economy must therefore be using a token money, which is nowadays a paper currency.


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