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Will artificial wombs resolve the abortion controversy?

Asked by: Fanny
  • It ends the issue.

    The prevailing argument regarding abortion debate isn't something as simple as "reproductive rights". The prevailing debate is whether life begins at conception. Now, how artificial wombs throw this debate for a whirl is that feminists can argue day and night about the right to not be pregnant, "pro-choice" as it where, but they will never be able to justify the now needless killing of the infant in the process. Once the child is removed from the womb, and as such no longer her problem, there is indeed no reason for the child to not be kept safe, be birthed, and ultimately adopted. If the pro-life side can adopt this "lesser evil", the entire abortion debate will be effectively resolved.

  • It'll at least diminish the controversy

    I see almost no downside to artificial wombs. If a woman decides that she does not want to have a child even though she is already pregnant, she can just transfer the fetus into the artificial womb and everybody wins. No fetuses were aborted, and no woman had to have an unwanted birth. The child could just be adopted later after it is born. There is, however, a small downside. Religious people will always find a problem with this because they are going to believe that it will "remove a bond between the mother and the child", even though that makes no sense considering that adopted children have the same bond with their mother as biological children. Artificial wombs will also be a huge bonus to feminism, since women will no longer be told to aspire to motherhood, since they could just have the womb do that for them.

  • Not at all

    The abortion controversy is mostly in regards to the religious view that life starts at conception. It doesn't matter if that life is growing in a woman or an artificial womb. To the religious, life is a life no matter what stage it is the moment sperm meets and fertilizes egg. To the none religious that disagree with abortion, they maybe more subdued because of the grounds that you wouldn't create life in this artificial womb, unless, it was planned for someone or something.
    Truth be told, you will probably get anther side in this fight that says artificial wombs are dangerous or unnatural to an extreme that man shouldn't be playing God.

  • The real issue is about controlling women and their sexuality.

    Artificial wombs have the potential to be a great service in clarifying the debate. For some abortion opponents (and I dare say most or all supporters), they will resolve the issue by allowing unwanted fetuses to be brought to term and adopted by people who want them. However, a sizable number of abortion opponents will not be swayed, because the real issue for them is women's sexuality. Those who want to control women will continue to oppose this innovation because, in their view, "women should not be able to have sex without consequences." The sexual revolution and the ability of women to control their bodies and to make independent decisions about their lives is intolerable to this segment of our population. Fortunately for the rest of us, the artificial womb will help reveal the real underlying issue in their world view.

  • That's not the real issue.

    Artificial wombs will definitely provide greater reproductive choices to a great many people, and will allow religious pregnant women and other pregnant women who don't wish to 'kill' the fetuses growing inside of them greater freedom in the matter. This isn't the real issue though; that would be the twofold 'life begins at conception' idea and the fact that many 'pro-lifers' don't really give two craps about the infants involved and just want their dogmatic, narrow-minded view of the world to be agreed to by everyone else. Artificial wombs would give the pro-choice side of the abortion debate more credibility, but honestly would probably be seen as some sort of unnatural monstrosity by at least a sizable minority of the pro-life side.


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