Amazon.com Widgets

With primary care increasingly being provided by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants--professions requiring far less training than traditional physicians--will medical mistakes increase?

Asked by: Ogamiitto
With primary care increasingly being provided by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants--professions requiring far less training than traditional physicians--will medical mistakes increase?
  • Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants should not be trusted to administer primary care to patients unsupervised.

    Seeing as traditional physicians go through substantially more education than NP's and PA's, and, therefore, have a greater knowledge of health and wellness, the symptoms of infections and diseases, and treatment options, side effects, and complications, it is only logical for them to be the health care professionals responsible for diagnosing and treating patients. The argument can be made that NP's and PA's should be given these responsibilities as well, for the benefit of the patients, so the patients are less rushed through appointments than they would be with a traditional physician's busy schedule, but this argument is invalid because wouldn't you rather accept terse appointments than put your health on the line?

    When I obtained a MRSA infection, I saw an NP who prescribed an antibiotic with the possible complication of an infection disease in the intestines. Sure enough, when I reappeared nine days after I started the dosage, describing the symptoms of the disease, I was told by the NP not to worry because it was "very rare for people my age and I was too young to obtain it" and was sent home without being tested. Two months later, when the symptoms were almost unbearable, I returned once again and she agreed to test me for it, finding that I did have it and that it has progressed over the last two months, so I was referred to the infectious disease department. However, I was allergic to the antibiotic used to treat the MRSA and the NP mistook my reaction for more MRSA, and although I told her the reaction didn't feel alike at all, she prescribed a second dosage of the same antibiotic I was allergic to and the one that gave me the infectious disease in my intestines. After starting this second dosage, I was sent to a dermatologist to confirm what the NP concluded was an infection. As soon as she saw it, the dermatologist determined that this second reaction, unlike the first, was not more MRSA but an allergic reaction to the antibiotic the NP hastily prescribed for a second time, without considering its aversive complications that I was almost guaranteed to have, as each time you get it the likelihood of a relapse increases. She ordered for that prescription to be terminated immediately, but it was too late, and I ended up with the intestinal infectious disease for a second time. This time it was even more severe than the first, and it ultimately left me with permanent nerve damage in my intestine and a higher likelihood for it to recur. This experience has revealed to me the necessity for all healthcare professionals trusted with primary care to receive the education of a traditional physician.

  • Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants should not be trusted to administer primary care to patients unsupervised.

    Seeing as traditional physicians go through substantially more education than NP's and PA's, and, therefore, have a greater knowledge of health and wellness, the symptoms of infections and diseases, and treatment options, side effects, and complications, it is only logical for them to be the health care professionals responsible for diagnosing and treating patients. The argument can be made that NP's and PA's should be given these responsibilities as well, for the benefit of the patients, so the patients are less rushed through appointments than they would be with a traditional physician's busy schedule, but this argument is invalid because wouldn't you rather accept terse appointments than put your health on the line?

    When I obtained a MRSA infection, I saw an NP who prescribed an antibiotic with the possible complication of an infection disease in the intestines. Sure enough, when I reappeared nine days after I started the dosage, describing the symptoms of the disease, I was told by the NP not to worry because it was "very rare for people my age and I was too young to obtain it" and was sent home without being tested. Two months later, when the symptoms were almost unbearable, I returned once again and she agreed to test me for it, finding that I did have it and that it has progressed over the last two months, so I was referred to the infectious disease department. However, I was allergic to the antibiotic used to treat the MRSA and the NP mistook my reaction for more MRSA, and although I told her the reaction didn't feel alike at all, she prescribed a second dosage of the same antibiotic I was allergic to and the one that gave me the infectious disease in my intestines. After starting this second dosage, I was sent to a dermatologist to confirm what the NP concluded was an infection. As soon as she saw it, the dermatologist determined that this second reaction, unlike the first, was not more MRSA but an allergic reaction to the antibiotic the NP hastily prescribed for a second time, without considering its aversive complications that I was almost guaranteed to have, as each time you get it the likelihood of a relapse increases. She ordered for that prescription to be terminated immediately, but it was too late, and I ended up with the intestinal infectious disease for a second time. This time it was even more severe than the first, and it ultimately left me with permanent nerve damage in my intestine and a higher likelihood for it to recur. This experience has revealed to me the necessity for all healthcare professionals trusted with providing primary care to receive the education of a traditional physician.

  • Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants should not be trusted with the responsibilities of providing primary care to patients unsupervised.

    Seeing as traditional physicians go through substantially more education than NP's and PA's, and, therefore, have a greater knowledge of health and wellness, the symptoms of infections and diseases, and treatment options, side effects, and complications, it is only logical for them to be the health care professionals responsible for diagnosing and treating patients. The argument can be made that NP's and PA's should be given these responsibilities as well, for the benefit of the patients, so the patients are less rushed through appointments than they would be with a traditional physician's busy schedule, but this argument is invalid because wouldn't you rather accept terse appointments than put your health on the line?

    When I obtained a MRSA infection, I saw an NP who prescribed an antibiotic with the possible complication of an infection disease in the intestines. Sure enough, when I reappeared nine days after I started the dosage, describing the symptoms of the disease, I was told by the NP not to worry because it was "very rare for people my age and I was too young to obtain it" and was sent home without being tested. Two months later, when the symptoms were almost unbearable, I returned once again and she agreed to test me for it, finding that I did have it and that it has progressed over the last two months, so I was referred to the infectious disease department. However, I was allergic to the antibiotic used to treat the MRSA and the NP mistook my reaction for more MRSA, and although I told her the reaction didn't feel alike at all, she prescribed a second dosage of the same antibiotic I was allergic to and the one that gave me the infectious disease in my intestines. After starting this second dosage, I was sent to a dermatologist to confirm what the NP concluded was an infection. As soon as she saw it, the dermatologist determined that this second reaction, unlike the first, was not more MRSA but an allergic reaction to the antibiotic the NP hastily represcribed. She ordered for that prescription to be terminated immediately, but it was too late, and I ended up with the intestinal infectious disease for a second time. This time it was even more severe than the first, and it ultimately left me with permanent nerve damage in my intestine and a higher likelihood for it to recur. This experience has revealed to me the necessity for all healthcare professionals trusted with primary care to receive the education of a traditional physician.

  • Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants should not be trusted to provide primary care.

    Seeing as traditional physicians go through substantially more education than NP's and PA's, and, therefore, have a greater knowledge of health and wellness, the symptoms of infections and diseases, and treatment options, side effects, and complications, it is only logical for them to be the health care professionals responsible for diagnosing and treating patients. The argument can be made that NP's and PA's should be given these responsibilities as well, for the benefit of the patients, so the patients are less rushed through appointments than they would be with a traditional physician's busy schedule, but this argument is invalid because wouldn't you rather accept terse appointments than put your health on the line?

    When I obtained a serious case of MRSA, I saw an NP who prescribed an antibiotic with the possible complication of an infection disease in the intestines. Sure enough, when I reappeared nine days after I started the dosage, describing the symptoms of the disease, I was told by the NP not to worry because it was "very rare for people my age and I was too young to obtain it" and was sent home without being tested. Two months later, when the symptoms were almost unbearable, I returned once again and she agreed to test me for it, finding that I did have it and that it has progressed over the last two months, so I was referred to the infectious disease department. However, I was allergic to the antibiotic used to treat the MRSA and the NP mistook my reaction for more MRSA, and although I told her the reaction didn't feel alike at all, she prescribed a second dosage of the same antibiotic I was allergic to and the one that gave me the infectious disease in my intestines. After starting this second dosage, I was sent to a dermatologist to confirm what the NP concluded was an infection. As soon as she saw it, the dermatologist determined that this second reaction, unlike the first, was not more MRSA but an allergic reaction to the antibiotic the NP overdosed me on. She ordered for that prescription to be terminated immediately, but it was too late, and I ended up with the intestinal infectious disease for a second time. This time it was even more severe than the first, and it ultimately left me with permanent nerve damage in my intestine and a higher likelihood for it to recur. This experience has revealed to me the necessity for all healthcare professionals trusted with primary care to receive the education of a traditional physician.

  • Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants should not be trusted to provide primary care.

    Seeing as traditional physicians go through substantially more education than NP's and PA's, and, therefore, have a greater knowledge of health and wellness, the symptoms of infections and diseases, and treatment options, side effects, and complications, it is only logical for them to be the health care professionals responsible for diagnosing and treating patients. The argument can be made that NP's and PA's should be given these responsibilities as well, for the benefit of the patients, so the patients are less rushed through appointments than they would be with a traditional physician's busy schedule, but this arguement is invalid because wouldn't you rather accept terse appointments than put your health on the line?

    When I obtained a serious case of MRSA, I saw an NP who prescribed an antibiotic with the possible complication of an infection disease in the intestines. Sure enough, when I reappeared nine days after I started the doseage, describing the symptoms of the disease, I was told by the NP not to worry because I was "too young to obtain it" and was sent home. Two months later, when the symptoms were almost unbearable, I returned once again and she agreed to test me for it, finding that I have had it all along, so I was referred to the infectious disease department. However, I was allergic to the antibiotic used to treat the MRSA and the NP mistook my reaction for more MRSA, and although I told her the reaction didn't feel alike at all, she prescribed a second dosage of the same antibiotic I was allergic to and the one that gave me the infectious disease in my intestines. After starting this second dosage, I was sent to a dermatologist to confirm what the NP concluded was an infection. As soon as she saw it, the dermatologist determined that this second reaction, unlike the first, was not more MRSA but an allergic reaction to the antibiotic the NP overdosed me on. She ordered for that prescription to be terminated immediately, but it was too late, and I ended up with the intestinal infectious disease for a second time, which ultimately left me with permanent nerve damage in my intestine and a higher likelihood for it to recur. This experience has revealed to me the necessity for all health care professionals trusted with primary care to receive the education of a traditional physician.

  • Mistakes are Inevitable

    Patients like their Nurse Practitioner and PA's for the reason that they have the luxury of spending time with them. Nevertheless, it is only logical to conclude that either the traditional doctors, who usually spend at least 12 tough years in school, were over-educated or their much less schooled counterparts working under the supposed guidance of MD's today are vastly under-trained. I never recall thinking in the past "This doc really knows WAY too much. If only we had primary healthcare providers who went to school half as long, the practice of medicine would be so much better." Of course, there is always the pretext of physician oversight, but where are these doctors when you receive care at a drugstore or are seen at urgent care? My intention here is not too denigrate hardworking, compassionate NP's and PA's. Given their limited training and resources, they do a hell of a job. But, if we are going to be brutally honest here, the rise of these professions has more to do with corporate bottom lines than a desire to provide longer doctor visits. If this is the wave of the future, let's first give these professional more training and then pay the what they are worth. Don't hold your breath...No telling whether or not the urgent care attending provider knows all he or she needs to treat you safely and effectively.

  • NP's and PA's have limited training - and limited capabilities to match.

    A NP or PA doesn't have free reign over diagnosis and treatments. For the most part, their decisions are confirmed by doctors, or else they work directly under doctors and only do what they're instructed to by the doctor. And clinics staffed exclusively by NP's or PA's are only acute-care centres. Places where people go for colds, cuts, and bumps. Basically for conditions you could survive without any sort of medical attention.

    One could argue that NPs and PAs will actually improve patient outcomes, since minor cases won't be occupying a doctor's practice. This allows doctors to spend time with patients with more severe ailments, increasing the quality of care delivered.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.