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  • I completely agree with davidnamyst18.

    Suppose a company has two product designers, a man and a woman. In accordance with equal pay, they are each paid $70,000 per year. One year, the male designer is very productive, so their employer gives him a raise of, say, $7,000 per year.
    Would their employer also have to give the woman an equal raise, in order to maintain equal pay? It seems like this would be the case under most equal pay laws being proposed.
    This is the problem I see with the equal pay movement. You hear the phrase "equal pay for equal work" so often, but "equal work" is not easy to quantify. "Equal work" can't be assumed to mean "equal position" because people at the same position aren't necessarily paid the same.
    If an equal pay law were implemented, the government would basically have to audit the salaries and wages of every single male & female employee for every incorporated business in the country. Whenever they find a man being paid more than a woman, they would have to verify that it's justified by some form of merit. Imagine how expensive this sort of investigation would be.
    An equal pay law is too simplistic to solve this problem." It would be extremely difficult for me to explain this in my own words, so I shall quote the above user. Not only would it be unenforceable, it wouldn't be fair to people of either gender that simply work harder than others.

  • Salary criteria is very complex.

    Suppose a company has two product designers, a man and a woman. In accordance with equal pay, they are each paid $70,000 per year. One year, the male designer is very productive, so their employer gives him a raise of, say, $7,000 per year.
    Would their employer also have to give the woman an equal raise, in order to maintain equal pay? It seems like this would be the case under most equal pay laws being proposed.
    This is the problem I see with the equal pay movement. You hear the phrase "equal pay for equal work" so often, but "equal work" is not easy to quantify. "Equal work" can't be assumed to mean "equal position" because people at the same position aren't necessarily paid the same.
    If an equal pay law were implemented, the government would basically have to audit the salaries and wages of every single male & female employee for every incorporated business in the country. Whenever they find a man being paid more than a woman, they would have to verify that it's justified by some form of merit. Imagine how expensive this sort of investigation would be.
    An equal pay law is too simplistic to solve this problem.


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