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Would (or did) an exceptionally long line or equipment failure keep you from voting?

  • Exceptionally long lines or equipment failure might keep me from voting

    Exceptionally long lines or equipment failure might keep me from voting. However, it depends on the time of the delay and the scope of the malfunction. Mere inconvenience should not be a reason to refuse to vote. But, if malfunctions or lines are unreasonable, then it might make sense to find an alternative.

  • Yes, a long line or equipment failure might deter me from voting.

    I have to answer honestly and say that most likely if I was going to be kept waiting for longer than an hour, I would leave without voting. Thankfully my polling location moved very quickly and efficiently. If it did not, I would have taken the view that my one vote was not going to decide the outcome of the election and probably have left without participating.

  • Yes, it would.

    Monitoring the polls by watching people vote, huh? The naivety is stunning. Who monitors the software that can be programmed to shave votes? WHY aren't there uniform Federal standards on technology with paper backup in every state? Technology isn't "advanced" enough? WHY doesn't it get better? Because of the hamster-wheel catch-22 that the winning Party doesn't have any incentive to FIX it?
    In 17-states - including the four key swing states of PA, VA, GA, & FL - there won't be any paper ballots issued to be used to verify voting results if challenged.

  • No, an exceptionally long line or equipment failure did not keep me from voting.

    No, an exceptionally long line or equipment failure did not keep me from voting, but I know it affected a lot of people, especially in North Carolina. It is a shame that an election could be decided by some machines not working, but that is the reality of our election.


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