Disraeli

Debates and Opinions

Debates

  • Conservatism is against progress and moving forward

    Benjamin Disraeli:I am actually a great admire of Benjamin Disraeli and I know that he said "Conservatism discards Prescription, shrinks from Principle, disavows Progress; having rejected all respect for antiquity, it offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future." Disraeli created the One Nation philosophy which wants to unite a nation split between the rich and the poor. Rushing change simply fails.1 - http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=conservative Disraeli, Oakeshott and Burke:I thought that Disraeli was making a comment on what you would call modern conservatism. Disraeli may have been a member of the Conservative party but I don't believe that he was a Tory at heart.On what Oakeshott said:Oakeshott's unwillingness to accept change because he perfers the familiar to the unknown is, to be quite blunt, cowardly.

  • Is Conservatism better than Marxism?

    Why of course the conservatives of Disraeli and Peel's day. I clearly noted Disrealis mass social reforms and that it is strongly accepted by historians that this was purely for self means of gaining the working class vote (which failed anyhow with gladstone gaining office) and not an accepted practice within the conservatives. One of the strongest original Peelites was William Ernsest Gladstone, Disreali's greatest rival and later Liberal Prime Minster.

Polls

  • Which is your favorite sport?

    During most of the 19th-century in fact, the term "tennis" referred to real tennis, not lawn tennis: for example, in Disraeli's novel Sybil, Lord Eugene De Vere announces that he will "go down to Hampton Court and play tennis.".The rules of tennis have changed little since the 1890s. During most of the 19th-century in fact, the term "tennis" referred to real tennis, not lawn tennis: for example, in Disraeli's novel Sybil, Lord Eugene De Vere announces that he will "go down to Hampton Court and play tennis.".The rules of tennis have changed little since the 1890s. During most of the 19th-century in fact, the term "tennis" referred to real tennis, not lawn tennis: for example, in Disraeli's novel Sybil, Lord Eugene De Vere announces that he will "go down to Hampton Court and play tennis.".The rules of tennis have changed little since the 1890s.

Forums

  • Ed Miliband V.S David Cameron

    The NHS Reform is idiotical on the scale of Thatcher's poll tax, but the retreat to Disraeli politics is something that is long overdue.

  • Civic Republicanism v. Communitarianism

    It's still right wing, but it has splits: in America, it is a big government republican ideology (very, very roughly) but in the international field, it's (again very very roughly) Disraeli politics: One Nation Conservatism.I say One Nation Conservatism rather than liberal conservatism b/c I don't want to explain political history and divides over the internet.Civic Republicanism advocates for positive rights and supports progressive ideas like equal rights for women and children and gay marriage.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q:
    What is the runtime of the motion picture "Disraeli"?
  • A:
    The total time for the movie is 90 minutes.
  • Q:
    The movie, "Disraeli" is in what genre?
  • A:
    The film is classified as... Drama and Silent film.
  • Q:
    Who distributed the motion picture, "Disraeli"?
  • A:
    Warner Bros. Entertainment was the film's distributor.
  • Q:
    Which honors did the film "Disraeli" win?
  • A:
    The film won the Academy Award for Best Actor.
  • Q:
    Which actors were the stars of movie, "Disraeli"?
  • A:
    George Arliss, Joan Bennett, Doris Lloyd and David Torrence played a role in the movie.
  • Q:
    Which director created the film "Disraeli"?
  • A:
    Alfred Green was the director of the motion picture.
  • Q:
    When was the premier of the film "Disraeli"?
  • A:
    The movie premiered in 1929.
  • Q:
    Who is credited for writing the film Disraeli?
  • A:
    Julien Josephson wrote the movie's script.

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