The Instigator
umaymah1234
Con (against)
The Contender
attigah_bernard
Pro (for)

Ban Faith Schools

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/1/2018 Category: Religion
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 209 times Debate No: 116182
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

umaymah1234

Con

Faith Schools should not be banned as they are an opportunity for children and teenagers to learn and explore their own or someone else's religion. Students can expand their knowledge on key points in History and different beliefs and opinions by attending these Schools; they can understand what people their own age believe and could even start to develop opinions of their own on certain topics. While Faith Schools aren't forcing students to become part of a chosen religion or follow certain aspects of one, they allow the student to have a more open view on people that do practise their religion and respect them and their opinions, these Schools also give students the advantage of learning about different religions.
(1) https://www.mumsnet.com...

(2) https://labourlist.org...
Research shows that in Faith Schools:



  • 83% of pupils in Church of England primary schools, and 85% of pupils in Roman Catholic primary schools achieved level 4 in Reading, Writing and Mathematics, compared to 81% in non-faith primary schools.
  • 60.6 per cent of pupils in Church of England schools, and 63.2 per cent of pupils in Roman Catholic schools achieved five good GCSEs, including English and mathematics, compared to 57.4 per cent of pupils in non-faith secondary schools.
  • A lower proportion of disadvantaged children are educated (12.1 per cent at KS2 versus 18.0 per cent; 12.6 per cent at KS4 versus 14.1 per cent);
  • A lower proportion of children with special educational needs anre educated (SEN) (16.8 per cent at KS2 versus 19.7 per cent; 14.4 per cent at KS4 versus 16.6 per cent);
  • And a larger proportion of high attaining pupils are enrolled (28.4 per cent at KS2 versus 23.7 per cent; 27.4 per cent at KS4 versus 24.5 per cent).


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Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by umaymah1234 3 years ago
umaymah1234
They will have the opportunity to learn about different religions in a Faith School as
all Faith Schools require at least 20% of students to have come from different religious backgrounds. Therefore, they will not just learn about "their own religion" due to the requirements of the school. Thank you for correcting and for challenging my debating skills.
Posted by canis 3 years ago
canis
"Faith Schools should not be banned as they are an opportunity for children and teenagers to learn and explore their own or someone else's religion."
Do they not just "learn" about their own religion ?..In a non-faith school you would probably come in contact with all religions, ( real life experience ) ...
And as a non-religious person why would I support / pay for any religion..
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