The Instigator
Pro (for)
Anonymous
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The Contender
frankfurter50
Con (against)
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Debate #26: Schools should replace art and music with calculus

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/16/2018 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 530 times Debate No: 110811
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

Pro

Welcome to debate #26. I believe that schools should replace art and music class with calculus class, because art and music is useless, whereas calculus is really useful.

In chemistry and physics (such as AP Physics C, which I took), calculus is really important. In engineering today, we still use calculus in countless ways, including finding limits, maximizing or minimizing values, etc.

Art and music may be fun, but they are just useless subjects that have no worth in the real world.
frankfurter50

Con

Calculus can be useful if a person is planning to become a rocket scientists. However, art and music are the ways in which humans express their very souls. If we were to end art and music, then the world would be dead and all civilization would fall into turmoil. Art does have a reason for being. It is the expression of creativity and can come in handy all the time. Some people might become scientists. What if a person wants to be an artist or a musician as an adult? If they wish to follow either of those careers, they will need art or music classes. I say too many people these days take boring office jobs. The world needs more artists. A kid should be able to take any classes that they want, and they can take calculus and art simultaneously. There is no reason to cease production of art or music classes. Both are less stressful than core classes and they allow a person to partake in exquisite creativity. Both art and music should stay alive, because when they are no longer practiced, humanity will have lost every ounce of integrity it has.
Debate Round No. 1

Pro

We can express our creativity through other mediums, such as writing books. Also, calculus is useful. When you play video games, drive, or start a business, calculus is involved, believe it or not, like it or not.

On the other hand, art and music are not very useful. In real life, answer me this question, please: How is art or music beneficial? How if calculus worthless?
frankfurter50

Con

We can express our creativity through writing books. But we can also express creativity through painting or drawing. There is no need to destroy art. Calculus is not involved in most jobs. Trigonometry might be. Algebra will be. But calculus- that's the highest form of math there is. Only people heading into incredibly scientific jobs will need to use it. Also, art and music does come in handy in certain jobs- if you want to be an artist or a musician. Ever think about that? We should give kids the option to take calculus of they're up for a challenge, and have art and music as options too. We do not need to replace art and music with calculus. Those are the most enjoyable classes for many students. Your proposition is absurd.
Debate Round No. 2

Pro

Weather Models
Weather is more accurately predicted than ever before. Part of the improvement is thanks to technology, such as computer modeling that uses calculus and is able to more meticulously predict upcoming weather. These computer programs also use types of algorithms to help assign possible weather outcomes in a region. Much like in the computer algorithms, weather forecasts are determined by considering many variables, such as wind speed, moisture level and temperature. Though computers do the heavy lifting of sifting through massive amounts of data, the basics of meteorology are grounded in differential equations, helping meteorologists determine how changes in the temperatures and pressures in the atmosphere may indicate changes in the weather.

Improving Public Health
The field of epidemiology -- the study of the spread of infectious disease -- relies heavily on calculus. Such calculations have to take three main factors into account: those people who are susceptible to a disease, those who are infected with the disease and those who have already recovered from it. With these three variables, calculus can be used to determine how far and fast a disease is spreading, where it may have originated from and how to best treat it. Calculus is especially important in cases such as this because rates of infection and recovery change over time, so the equations must be dynamic enough to respond to the new models evolving every day.

Architecture
Calculus is used to improve the architecture not only of buildings but also of important infrastructures such as bridges. Bridges are complex constructions because they have to be able to support varying amounts of weight across large spaces. When designing a bridge, one must take into account factors including weight, environmental factors and distance. Because of this, maths such as differential calculus and integral calculus are often used to create the most robust design. The use of calculus is also creating a change in the way other architecture projects are designed, pushing the frontier of what sorts of shapes can be used to create the most beautiful buildings. For example, though many buildings have arches with perfect symmetry, calculus can be used to create archways that are not symmetric along with other odd shapes that are still able to be structurally sound
frankfurter50

Con

Calculus is handy for those thing, and kids can take calculus if they want to do those things, but some kids want to be artists or musicians, and they should be able to.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by DeletedUser 3 years ago
DeletedUser
Just hurry up and debate. Please.
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