The Instigator
youngdonthesauceGod
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Mr_Popper
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Dog fights can protect the owner from danger

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/8/2019 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 586 times Debate No: 120234
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

youngdonthesauceGod

Pro

Ramiro-Something that benefits the owner of the dog is how they train their dog or dogs because the dogs can protect the owner when there is a threat. We say this because if the owner were to get attacked by someone the dog would be able to defend him or her from the person trying to attack them.
Mr_Popper

Con

I'm having a little trouble understanding what you're trying to say, But I'm going to assume you mean something like "dogs can gain fighting skills from dog fighting that they can use to protect their owners". If you mean something else, Please tell me and I will correct myself.

A dog will not get better at fighting from participating in dog fights (it may become stronger and tougher, Though). This is why you don't see pugs in the ring fighting giant, Fearsome dogs. Dog fighting dogs are bred, Not crafted.

There's also the fact that dog fighting can be fatal, Even for the winning dog. Dogs can be seriously injured or even killed, And I'm sure we can all agree that even a slightly injured dog will have trouble fighting off someone that's a threat to their owner.

As I said, Dog fighting dogs are bred. It wouldn't be at all necessary to risk your dog's health fighting if it was bred to be deadly in the first place. If anything, You're wasting a potentially great defense dog by letting it fight and get hurt by just as dangerous animals.
Debate Round No. 1
youngdonthesauceGod

Pro

youngdonthesauceGod forfeited this round.
Mr_Popper

Con

I'm going to assume you're giving up. If you'd like to continue, I'd be happy to.
Debate Round No. 2
youngdonthesauceGod

Pro

youngdonthesauceGod forfeited this round.
Mr_Popper

Con

In summary, I disagree with the idea that dog fighting makes dogs any better at defending their owners because dogs aren't really trained and are instead bred to be fierce, Making the process of dragging them into potentially lethal encounters both redundant and counter productive.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by K_Michael_Tolman 3 years ago
K_Michael_Tolman
Dogs already have a protective instinct. Either they will defend their owner, Or they won't. You cannot make a mild-mannered dog into some deadly machine. Dog fighting is a particularly ineffective way to train them anyway. A training course similar to what police dogs undergo would be much more beneficial.

That is a problem, However. Wherever a dog can be trained to defend, It can also be trained to attack. If everyone trained their dogs to protect them, The criminals would become the ones with the big bad Dobermans and Rottweilers. It enables them to target even more than before those who do not have trained dogs. If you have an allergy, Little money, Or live in an apartment and can't have a dog, Such as the majority of people in criminally active cities like New York, You have become an easy target in a world where the gangs have attack dogs.
Posted by Mr_Popper 3 years ago
Mr_Popper
I'm going to assume you're trying to say that dogs become better fighters through being in dog fights and that therefore they can do a better job at protecting their owners. If I'm mistaken, Please tell me! I don't want to misunderstand what you're trying to say and then send an irrelevant argument. I'm going to wait an hour or two before I begin, But if I don't get a response soon I'm going to carry on with this assumption.
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