The Instigator
AKMath
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Cartographic
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

End The No - Zero Policy!

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/27/2018 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 593 times Debate No: 118416
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (4)
Votes (0)

 

AKMath

Pro

Here's to a good debate. :)
Cartographic

Con

I accept your debate on whether the No-Zero Policy should be ended or not. Allow me to state that while I support the policy, There should be restrictions; A student should not be able to turn in a 4-week-late assignment, Having cheated on it, And get a near-passing grade on it. However, The system itself holds some fundamental truths; Taken as a student who very nearly failed Science Class 10th grade, Only getting 1% above a pass, Due to the fact that I was unable to meet deadlines for major projects and got 0's repeatedly, I do believe that the no-zero policy, When properly laid out with the proper restrictions, May be a positive for the schooling system. I will refer to my own experience with school, Statistical averages of both Canada and The United States, And personal opinion for my argument. For the first round, I will refer solely to personal experience.

Firstly, I'll give an example of a real assignment I was given, Why I was incapable of completing it, And how having a No-Zero policy would have helped. I was given one week to create a working model of a refracting telescope using mirrors, Lenses, Cardboard, And tape. I was expected to purchase all the supplies myself, And was expected to make it properly work as though a professional telescope. Since I was expected to use full-grade materials, This would have cost me several hundred dollars, Money my family simply did not have to spend on a science project. I talked to the school counselors, And 1 day away from the deadline, They said they would co-ordinate to buy me supplies. They did, But they bought dollar store supplies. As you could guess, My project wasn't up to standard, And I was given a 0. My written work got a 100, But since I was incapable of purchasing science-grade materials, And the physical work counted for 75% of the mark on the project, I was given a whopping 25%. This dropped my mark over 5% in an already struggling class. Had I been given a no-zero mark of even 25 percent on the physical project, This would have saved at least 1. 5% of my overall grade, And that's assuming the minimum that the No-Zero policy applies.

Secondly, I will give an example from a class where I managed well but many other students did not. We were given an assignment where we had to calculate trajectory of a slingshot, Use that to predict where a projectile would land, And then calculate the trajectory if it went twice as far. While I managed this fine, Many students struggled to understand, And the teacher was busy from student to student trying to help them understand. In the end, Almost half the class got 0 or close to it because the teacher simply left us to ourselves to learn the work. The teacher told us what we had to learn, Then told us to go online and look it up. She only started helping on the 3rd day of the project, When it was due after 4. Many students were obviously very confused and left in the dust, And some of them saw hits to their grades as big as 10% since this was our culminating activity. With a No-Zero policy, Negligent teachers such as these would not be able to fail students simply because they can't teach themselves or cannot afford supplies.

Thirdly, A large point of the No-Zero policy is to prevent sickness. As someone with a strong immune system, I don't fall sick often, But when I do it's for weeks at a time and at a very high severity. I've been sick 4 times since 2012; In all cases, I had to go to the emergency room several times and missed school for no less than 18 days. With a No-Zero policy, Legitimate, Called-in absences would not allow for projects to be marked as 0; they would have to be offered as make-up projects with a reasonable time for completion offered. I failed 3 classes in the first half of grade 10 because of illness striking during the middle of the semester, Causing me to miss no less than 2 big projects per class, Plummeting my grades to unmanageable levels. While this isn't common, It does happen, And accommodation is important.

As it is in its' early stages, The No-Zero Policy obviously is very rough and cannot be trusted 100%. However, I believe that with some tuning this may turn out to be a change for the better. Obviously there will have to be limitations as stated earlier; Unannounced absences, Cheated projects, And long-overdue projects that reasonably should take no more than 1 or 2 days would all still count for low grades.
Debate Round No. 1
AKMath

Pro

AKMath forfeited this round.
Cartographic

Con

Cartographic forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
AKMath

Pro

AKMath forfeited this round.
Cartographic

Con

Cartographic forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
AKMath

Pro

AKMath forfeited this round.
Cartographic

Con

Cartographic forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by AKMath 3 years ago
AKMath
In schools in America, The lowest grade you can get is a 50. Even if I don't turn in an assignment, And the teacher has nothing, The lowest she/he can give me is a 50%.
Posted by Block19 3 years ago
Block19
What is the no zero policy?
Posted by asta 3 years ago
asta
What is it?
Posted by FanboyMctroll 3 years ago
FanboyMctroll
I totally agree, I already started this debate, But not in such a polite manner as yourself.

My debate called the result students of the no zero policy as retards!
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