The Instigator
gabster3gf
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
mperez
Con (against)
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0 Points

High schools should start at 8:30 am

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/5/2018 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,111 times Debate No: 112371
Debate Rounds (3)
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Votes (0)

 

gabster3gf

Pro

A later start for high schools, 8 am, will help improve students life and performance. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends teenagers get a daily 8-10 hours of sleep in order to maintain good health (1). The truth is, with sports, extracurricular activities, a social life, and homework, students sleep late and have to wake up too early. Thus, students are sleeping less than what is healthy for their growing bodies and minds causing dangerous results. The American Academy of Pediatrics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and American Medical Association all recommend that high schools start class no earlier than 8:30 a.m. to allow students to get healthy sleep (2). Sleeping is essential in life. Statistics gotten from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that "more than 4 in 5 (82.3%) of U.S. middle, high, and combined public schools require students to attend class at times earlier than recommended" (3). Furthermore, The CDC's Youth Risk Behavior Survey in 2015 showed that "73% of U.S. high school students get fewer than 8 hours of sleep on school nights, and 43% get 6 or fewer hours" (3). The risks that can arise from a lack of sleep include becoming overweight, performing poorly, suffering from depression, and engaging in risky health behaviors like drinking and smoking (3). When a student does not adequately sleep, they do not feel alert and cannot retain information (4). Clearly, something is not working out with the current high school starting times and when something does not work, change is needed. Starting school at 8:30 am will allow students to sleep the amount needed, stay healthy, and focus in order to perform at their top potential.

https://aasm.org...
http://www.startschoollater.net...
https://www.cdc.gov...
https://sleepfoundation.org...
mperez

Con

School should not start at a later time because it may only cause the students to sleep even later, since they don't have to wake up at an earlier time, and will cause them to be exposed to light at night, making it harder for them get up for school in the morning. The Scientific Reports published a research in 2017 done by scholars from the Surrey Sleep Research Centre and Department of Mathematics. In this research, they used "mathematical modeling" to understand that people are not naturally a morning or evening person and it depends on when they're exposed to light. According to a TES article, published in March of 2017, the academics from Surrey University and Harvard Medical School argue that changing the time of when school starts will only cause most teenagers' "internal clocks" to drift later. To further explain, students will be up later and their exposure to light at night will make it harder for them to get up later in the morning. They believe that exposure to light during the day is best for them because the lights will be off or dimmed by night. Their predictions on how to get more and better sleep are based on how light interacts with the "biological clock." So, if school starting times are delayed, then students will most likely be up later, exposing themselves to artificial light from things, such as lamps or phones, which will make it harder for them to get up later in the morning.

https://www.tes.com...
https://www.sciencedaily.com...
Debate Round No. 1
gabster3gf

Pro

I understand that natural light is preferable over artificial light, but many students have jobs and activities that cause their "internal clocks" to shift anyways, but they still have to wake up early causing many unhealthy side effects. Not only this but according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a later starting time can increase attendance at schools and decrease car accidents because teens are more awake while behind the wheel (1). When students work, their shifts are later in the afternoon, and they do not get home until the nighttime causing them to sleep late because of their circumstances. A later start time would allow them to sleep more, feel better, and perform better. Teens are naturally wired to sleep later, so no matter what time they have to be up they are still sleeping late (2). Personally, I sleep late every day if I have to be up at 6 am or 9 am. Having extra time to sleep would make a huge difference in my mood, alertness, and focus. In middle school, our start time was 9 am. In those two years, I never felt sleep deprived and felt well rested at school. I slept over 7 hours each day. Now in high school, 6 hours of sleep sounds amazing. For people who do sports, sleep is important and can help their performance as well as prevent sports injuries (3). Everything factored in, a later school time would be the best remedy for sleep-deprived students who struggle every day to stay awake in class and make the best of their education.

(1) https://aasm.org......
(2) http://time.com......
(3) https://www.athleticbusiness.com......
mperez

Con

While it is true that a lack of sleep may danger students when driving, starting school at a later time may not affect these circumstances. More sleep will increase their ability to perform and feel better, however, if a school starting time is delayed, it'll only push back and affect other schedules. My opponent mentioned that students need more sleep especially if they're in sports, for it affects their performance. Starting school at a later time will change their schedules and students will get out of school later in the afternoon, pushing their after-school practices even farther back. In other words, it'll make no difference. According to the National Federation of State High School Association (NFHS), in the years of 2016-2017, nearly 8 million students were playing sports in school. This means that a very large amount of students who play sports, and even more with those in other after-school activities, will not be benefitted by the change of a school's starting time because their practices will just start later, causing them to go home at a later time anyway. To add on to my argument, in an article by the U.S. News and World Report published in November of 2015, they discuss reports done by the American Association of Caregiving Youth. In these reports, it is stated that approximately 1.4 million children between the ages of 8-18 are caregivers. They take care of their family members in need, but if school started later, they would be going home at a later time. Every day after school, I watch my younger brothers because my mother is at work. If I got out of school later, my brothers would not have anyone to watch over them. Delaying the school starting time may benefit a student who does not participate in after-school activities, but it may also negatively affect what they do for their family.

https://www.nfhs.org...
https://health.usnews.com...
Debate Round No. 2
gabster3gf

Pro

My opponent states that if school started later, younger siblings would not have anyone to take care of them. In reality, as displayed by the website Start School Later, "Over 20% of U.S. middle schools start class at 7:45 a.m. or earlier" (1). In other words, about 80% of middle schools start later and thus, if high schools start later, then there would not be an issue. On the contrary, it would benefit those students who are caregivers because rather than waiting for their siblings to get out of school, they will both be out at the same time causing less time to be wasted. In regards to students in sports, a later call time would make practices later, but this is not a bad thing. As shown by the National Education Association, "The adolescent body doesn"t begin to produce melatonin, a hormone linked to sleep cycles, until around 11:00 pm, leaving adolescents with a limited window in which to obtain sufficient sleep" (2). Some practices would get pushed back, but teens sleep later already, so a later start time will allow them to sleep more. Also, from personal experience, some sports practices already start late. For example, during soccer season, my practice started at 4 pm. I got home late, but was still expected to do homework, chores, shower, and sleep more than the recommended amount while having to wake up at 6 am. Why bother changing the system that has been in place for centuries? Well, as the national sleep foundation puts it, "Teens spend a great portion of each day in school; however, they are unable to maximize the learning opportunities afforded by the education system, since sleep deprivation impairs their ability to be alert, pay attention, solve problems, cope with stress and retain information" (3). All in all, early high school start times already affect teens negatively throughout the country. Taking this risk could eliminate many of these issues and benefit everyone as a whole.

https://open.spotify.com...
http://neatoday.org...
https://sleepfoundation.org...
mperez

Con

My opponent states that teenagers sleep late anyway. If this was the case, then wouldn"t pushing the school starting time to 8:30 cause them to sleep even later? By pushing back their whole schedule, it"ll put their sleeping schedule back too. According to an article published on The Guardian website by Luisa Dillner on November of 2013, it discusses a research done on the amount of sleep teenagers get. It states, and I quote, "teenagers need 9.5 hours of sleep a night, but on average get only 7.5 hours" (Dillner). This means that teenagers don"t get enough sleep, as my opponent stated, but the school starting time is not the issue. In the same article, they discuss solutions for teenagers to get the amount of sleep they need. The mention that the problem is the social media, their constant use of mobile phones, and their abnormal sleeping schedule. Sleeping late at night on weekends and walking up in the middle of the day is affecting the way they sleep on school nights. To further explain my argument, changing the the starting time to a later time will cause the students to come home late which will not only affect their schedules, but also their families". In an article published in November of 2017, written by Preeti Varathan, the average mother spends 15 hours with their kids and fathers spend 9 hours with their kids a week. This means that if their children go home later, they"ll spend even less time with their children a week, which isn"t good for their mental health. All in all, if students start school at a later time, it may encourage sleeping at an even later time, it will affect their schedules, and will reduce the amount of time spent with their siblings and parents.

https://www.google.com...
https://www.google.com...
Debate Round No. 3
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