The Instigator
joostinchang
Pro (for)
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The Contender
Its_over_9000
Con (against)
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K-12 student governments should be democracies instead of republics

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/2/2018 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 476 times Debate No: 118827
Debate Rounds (3)
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joostinchang

Pro

Elementary, Middle and High school students are given an opportunity during their K-12 years to experience a taste of the experience of voting. Student governments are intended to teach students the merits of a democratic process and the responsibility that comes with the leadership should you be elected.

The problem with the current model is that student government is roughly modeled after the American democratic republic political model of elected officials, Primarily consisting of a president, Vice president, Treasurer and secretary (some educational institutions opt to have more) with a number of student representatives speaking on behalf of a class/grade/etc. The president is tasked with voicing the opinions of the students, Vice presidents assist presidents in that function, Treasurers handle finances, Secretaries keep meeting minutes and representatives give the voice of their particular class.

The problem with this model is that the elected officials are constrained in their authority. Hired faculty and the school district board of education can override the decisions of the student body and often do if the decisions of the students conflict with their decisions. Students are then demoralized and the responsibilities of the elected officials are limited to event planning and fundraisers. The democratic process loses value as no tangible change can occur and the elections become a popularity contest.

An alternative solution I would implement is the application of true democratic structures in k-12 schools. Give the student body 51% equity in school decisions so that if the entire school votes in favor of a certain policy, The students can make decisions that override the decisions of the administrators. Hold bi-weekly or monthly open forums for students to discuss and debate pressing topics and allow all students who attend to have a voice. Empower students to go out and become politically active, Instead of having defeatist mentalities like "there's no point in running or voting, The other candidate is more popular. "

True democracies in actual societies have far-reaching consequences, Much of which hurt societies more than they help due to the majority's ability to create policy that benefits the majority at the expense of the minority; however, In the microcosm that is the American K-12 system, A true democracy structure has the potential to change the way future generations of students view society, Government, Politics and more. Giving students more authority and more responsibility to help them learn and grow into mature adults, I believe, Far outweighs the consequences of immature decisions that could be made. Of course, I believe there should be some constraints regarding policies that would violate local, State or federal laws or any policy that might physically, Mentally or emotionally harm students; however, All other decisions regarding school policies (dress codes, Cafeteria options, Sports management, Event planning, School security, Construction projects, Course offerings, Etc. ) should be subject to student body approval.
Its_over_9000

Con

Lol
Your argument is a big mess.
Debate Round No. 1
Its_over_9000

Con

Its_over_9000 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
joostinchang

Pro

joostinchang forfeited this round.
Its_over_9000

Con

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Debate Round No. 3
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