The Instigator
lhaspel
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
BiggsBoonj
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Menstrual products should be free

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/10/2019 Category: Health
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,572 times Debate No: 120740
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (5)
Votes (0)

 

lhaspel

Pro

Menstrual products should be free. All women need menstrual products to prevent/soak up the flow of blood caused by periods. Without menstrual products, The blood can stain clothes and is very messy. Menstrual products are also taxed as luxury items and are, In no way, A luxury. Condoms are free in places such as colleges. Condoms are not needed for hygienic purposes whereas menstrual products are. Menstrual products, Such as pads and tampons, Can be expensive costing people lots of money. It's already expensive to be a human, Why should you have to add the cost of menstrual products onto it?
BiggsBoonj

Con

From what I understand, You want menstrual products to be completely free because they are necessary for women. I disagree with that so let's begin the debate.

First of all, Using the logic that "people need that for hygiene" doesn't mean that we should make that free. People need dental products for hygiene, But do you make dental products free? People need toilet paper for hygiene, But do you make toilet paper free? If you went around and made things free just because "people need that for hygiene", You would have to make a lot of things free. Such as: menstual products, Dental products, Toilet paper, Soap, Shampoo, Tissues, Deodorants, Etc.

Second, Nothing is free. The only organization that can provide free things is the government. Companies don't produce anything for free. Which means that you will have to pay taxes to get free menstrual products, Which is completely pointless. And should men have to pay these taxes too, Or only women? Most women enter menopause at about 50, Would they have to pay such a tax too? Taxing others just because you don't want to spend a few bucks is ridicolous.
Debate Round No. 1
lhaspel

Pro

I see your point, And I guess I might change my argument a little bit. I think that menstrual products should at least not be taxed. Menstrual products add up over time and the taxes just make it even more expensive. I believe that menstrual products should at least be free in schools and other similar places such as public bathrooms. Toilet paper is free in public bathrooms and is used for hygienic purposes.

Condoms are free at most colleges whereas menstrual products are not. This shouldn't be the case because condoms are not needed for health purposes. Even if we would have to pay taxes, It wouldn't be that much, Especially if it were split between everyone in the U. S.

Menstrual products are very important because if they aren't used, Women will bleed through their clothing and stain it.
BiggsBoonj

Con

So, You change your argument from "menstrual products should be free" to "menstrual products shouldn't be taxed". Let's get to that, But first some of your arguments.

You say that condoms are free. I personally don't think condoms should be free, As they are extraordinarily cheap and accessible. But colleges don't want students to get pregnant, So I see the reasoning. Saying that people won't have to pay a lot for free menstrual products is ridicolous too. Does that mean you can tax them because you don't want to pay for your own hygiene products? Of course not. Why should men and women in menopause pay for something they will never use?

The argument that menstrual products are very important doesn't mean they should be free or shouldn't be taxed. Dental products are important, Toilet paper is important, Soap is important, Shampoo is important, Clothes are important, Food is important. . . Something being important for humans to live doesn't mean it should be free or not taxed. Please find a better argument than "women need menstrual products". I need to floss my teeth everyday, But do I advocate for floss being free or not taxed?

Menstrual products are very cheap. You can go and buy 30 tampons for $7 at Walmart. That's cheaper than condoms, Which you are so against being free. Don't tell me that an average American woman can't go to a store and buy cheap menstrual products. That's crap.
Debate Round No. 2
lhaspel

Pro

Wow, I realized I am really bad at debating. . . .

Anyway, Periods aren't just menstrual products, There are many other things people buy to help them get through their periods. Https://www. Huffpost. Com/entry/period-cost-lifetime_n_7258780

You don't have to have sex in college, You don't need condoms if you're not going to be doing it.

Yes, People need food, Water, Etc. But I believe that menstrual products. Many foods also aren't taxed (depending on where you live). I believe that menstrual products should at least be free in public places, Like toilet paper. When you are having your period, You can't just drive home to go get a pad or tampon, Especially at school.

I see your points and now realize that it would be somewhat hard for menstrual products to be totally free but they should at least be free in public places such as bathrooms and schools.
BiggsBoonj

Con

Of course periods aren't just menstrual products. Never said they weren't. But HuffPost is very left-wing (https://mediabiasfactcheck. Com/huffington-post) and not trusted, So I wouldn't reccomend using it in a debate.

I already made clear that I don't think students should be provided with free condoms. Not sure why we are debating that.

Toilet paper is needed by all sexes and all ages to stay clean after going to the toilet. Menstrual products are only needed by around half of women, And only a few days a month. So there is much less demand for menstrual products and they are more expensive than toilet paper. Which is why they're not provided at bathrooms and schools. I am not aware of any US state of country that doesn't tax foods. We tax foods, We tax soap, We tax dental products, We tax clothes. . . Why shouldn't menstrual products be taxed? They are used by a smaller fraction of the population than all the other products I just listed, So why shouldn't they be taxed?

You haven't listed a single reason why menstrual products should be free/untaxed and why other necessary products used by a much higher percentage of the population shouldn't be.
Debate Round No. 3
lhaspel

Pro

lhaspel forfeited this round.
BiggsBoonj

Con

BiggsBoonj forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
lhaspel

Pro

lhaspel forfeited this round.
BiggsBoonj

Con

BiggsBoonj forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by K_Michael_Tolman 3 years ago
K_Michael_Tolman
Technically, All hygienic products are a luxury. Some places don't even have more basic commodities like clean clothes or running water, So I think that it's unfair to demand tampons and such for free without first providing these other things to the people who need them.
And no other hygiene products are free, So are you specifically arguing that menstrual products should be free, Or all other hygiene products with them? And if hygiene products should be free because they are "necessary, " what about other necessities, Like food?
Posted by TheCounterArgument 3 years ago
TheCounterArgument
I honestly think that if stuff like this are free condoms should be free. Just my opinion.
Posted by WrickItRalph 3 years ago
WrickItRalph
I'm inclined to agree, Assuming that pro presents a good standard by which something should be free.
Posted by screenjack 3 years ago
screenjack
free: not taxed like food and other mandatory items or free: provided for you by the government?
Posted by Kvng_8 3 years ago
Kvng_8
I agree! I always thought this. Can't wait to see how this debate unfolds.
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