The Instigator
ThatAwesomeGuyOwen
Pro (for)
The Contender
Harleygator
Con (against)

Should Homework be Banned?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/28/2017 Category: Entertainment
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 819 times Debate No: 102276
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
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ThatAwesomeGuyOwen

Pro

Should homework be banned? I don"t know, what do you think? I think it should, not that I want to dumber, or anything dumb like that. I want YOUR opinion on that. I hope you enjoy!

First off, it wastes a lot of your time. The reason I think that is because when you are planning to do something fun after school, the teacher ends up giving you homework. When that happens, you don"t have time to do anything fun! That is the reason(s) why I think that.

Second off, too much homework could actually be bad for you. The reason is that you can't help out around the house and doing chores (which includes helping your mom out). Also, you can"t do stuff you really want to do. That includes playing video games, playing outside, riding your skateboard, and even more! In my opinion, that is a lot of reasons. And also when you have too much, you spend a lot of time doing homework, then your test grades

Third off, homework can be very stressful to kids. According to HealthLine.com, it says "when students are pushed to handle a workload that"s out of sync with their development level, it can lead to significant stress." The reason behind that is because you can stay up VERY late doing your homework, like 9:00. You are very tired so your brain falls asleep. That means you can"t think of what the answer is and you get mad. My second reason is that you get very tired when you are working on it, then, you fall asleep. For last, you have SO MUCH! So much you can"t finish all of it in one DAY!

So, now I hope you know that homework should be banned. Now, it"s time to discover what opinion you can think about and write about it!
Harleygator

Con

I'd like to start by thanking the Instigator for fielding this motion. I hope this will be a productive and polite debate between two intellectual heavyweights.

To begin my argument, I'd like to offer initial rebuttals to the three arguments forwarded by the proposition.

The first, that homework "wastes" time, is relative to two factors; what the homework actually is, and what activity the recipient would otherwise do. In both instances, depending on factors unknown to either side, homework could prove beneficial to the recipient's intellectual development, as well as the necessity of such work restraining them from more frivolous behaviour or, dare I say, anti-social behaviour, a growing problem within dense urban areas.

The second, that homework "could be bad for you", is defended by the proposition through reasoning that "you can't do stuff you want to do". Of course, "stuff" you may want to do aren't necessarily practicably beneficial, and some can even be harmful. Skateboarding, an example used, is one such activity. The simple counter to this, which I will expand upon in my own arguments, is that homework "could be good for you", and, indeed, has a higher probability of being so.

The third and final rebuttal, that "homework can be stressful", depends on the quantity and severity of the homework set. One could simply argue for the giving of moderate or reasonable levels of homework that serve a supplementary role that would annul every piece of reasoning given by the proposition in this instances.

I would now like to move on to present a series of my own arguments. Supplement to learning, engagement with parents, preparation for higher and further education.

This first argument is that homework can be a useful supplement to learning. There are many reasons for this, but the reasoning I will focus on is the diffusion of subject matter in a school schedule. In a secondary education system (and even more so in a primary system), students are given general collective tuition across a range of subjects within a restrictive period of time. The need for school schedules to offer a variety of subject areas, particularly in our widespread comprehensive system, dilutes the focus of these disciplines, so that the education provided is little more than a sequence of basic introductions to subject areas, not conducive to full understanding or engagement. Homework provides an opportunity for recipients to supplement their introductions with focused, exploratory learning, the repetition of which can be beneficial to memory retention. Obviously, such a process, it can be argued, improves grades, understanding, and lessens the burdens within classes on teachers to dwell upon topics that could district the class schedule and learning in other areas.

The second argument is that homework improves engagement with parents. Often, children and parents do not converse on a consistent basis about their school progress, which is the rationale for regular parent-teacher evenings. Homework enables the parents not only to get involved with and aid their children's intellectual development, but to keep abreast of the pace of their development, and the direction in which they are being taken by the school itself. The child can obviously benefit from this process, as can the school, who have a source of feedback from engaged and informed parents.

The final argument in this round is that homework is excellent preparation for higher and further education. Throughout secondary education, college, and university, extra-curricular learning is essential to the success of students, and to the grading system, which allows students to demonstrate knowledge through coursework in a more relaxed manner than through formal examination. An early foundation of these practices can lead to greater self-reliance in teenage years and beyond.
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Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Coveny 1 year ago
Coveny
Had you been on the pro homework side of the debate I would have accepted.

http://www.livescience.com...
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