The Instigator
Comrie7thGradeELA
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
TheMorningsStar
Con (against)
Winning
9 Points

Should Schools Spend Millions of Dollars on Competitive Sports?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
TheMorningsStar
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/15/2018 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 791 times Debate No: 108121
Debate Rounds (1)
Comments (3)
Votes (2)

 

Comrie7thGradeELA

Pro

hkjhkjhkjh
TheMorningsStar

Con

Should Schools Spend Millions of Dollars on Competitve Sports?

I thank Comrie7thGradeELA for this debate, though I am also confused on why they would not post any arguments in their one and only round.
However, I still feel the question is an important one to consider.

To answer the question we must consider what the primary purpose of a school is. It is not physical fittness of the students, but education.
As technology and science progress each year we must better prepare students for the world. This means that the level of math, reading, science, etc. education has to be on the rise in order to keep up with the changing world, otherwise students will not be prepared for the world.

Now, we need to break down the question further, to the k-12 level and to the college/university level.

For the k-12 level we must ask:
1) Is the quality of graduating students increasing?
2) And at a rate that matches the increase in technology and science in the world?
If the answer to either question is "no", then I think that it is a safe bet to say that the money used on sports should be used to increase the quality of education instead.

For the college level we must also ask:
1) Are colleges actually preparing their students as they should be?
If the answer is "no" then I think it is also safe to say that some of that money should be better put into preparing their students.

Note:
I just have to show that a single one of these questions can be answered with NO as that would show that I have fulfilled, at least part, of my burden of proof while my opponent has not even made an argument (thus fulfilling none of their BoP).

Is the Quality of Graduating Students (Prinary Education) increasing?

This is the primary question to ask when it comes to spending during K-12, and sadly the answer is no, it isn't.
A global study shows that reading[1], science[2], and math[3] skills are not on the rise in the US at all, the scores are either the same as previous years or, in the case of mathematics, on the decline[4].

[1] https://nces.ed.gov...;
[2] https://nces.ed.gov...;
[3] https://nces.ed.gov...;
[4] https://nces.ed.gov...;

Are Colleges and Universities Properly Preparing Students for the Real World?

Sadly, much like with K-12 education, the answer to this question is also a no.
Undergraduate level education is not preparing students anymore, in fact actual work experience has been doing a better job at this in most fields[5]. Not only this, but the quality of undergrad education has also been decreasing[6].

[5] https://www.forbes.com...;
[6] http://www.nytimes.com...;

Furthermore...

The sports culture at some universities has also distracted people from the primary goal of the university, education.
Some universities are increasing their sports budget while the universities may tend to ignore certain academics[7]. Furthermore, for the universities that have to teams that don't perform well, this can cause even more financial issues[8].

[7] http://www.nytimes.com...;
[8] https://www.theatlantic.com...;

In Conclusion

Schools should not be spending millions on sports as it takes away the focus from the academics, which is the purpose of schools. The quality of education both in K-12 and undergrad is not increasing, in fact it is decreasing. Students are not being properly prepared for the real world. The money spent on sports can be better used to help with the actual education of students.

Vote Con.
Debate Round No. 1
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by TheMorningsStar 3 years ago
TheMorningsStar
@Ragnar

Thank you for the link!
Posted by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
There's patterns I've seen in my time here, that make the conclusion about certain behaviors nearly certain.

Oh and in case you haven't seen it yet, you might find this useful (even has all voting rules displayed logically on a single page): http://goo.gl...
Posted by TheMorningsStar 3 years ago
TheMorningsStar
Thank you @Ragnar for voting.
Honestly, wouldn't be surprised if this was just the OP being too lazy to do their homework, but I need three debates before I can vote, so... *shrug*
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Arganger 3 years ago
Arganger
Comrie7thGradeELATheMorningsStarTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Only Con made an argument, and pro's argument was, "hkjhkjhkjh" Pro didn't spell it right, his argument is nonexistent and he used no sources.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
Comrie7thGradeELATheMorningsStarTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Thank you con, for doing pro's homework for him. No pro arguments to grade, and con's are not contested (when pro had BoP), so automatic con victory.

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