The Instigator
CyberneticHacker
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Amphia
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Slum tourism is helping the poor

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/15/2018 Category: Places-Travel
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,652 times Debate No: 108141
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (11)
Votes (0)

 

CyberneticHacker

Pro

Definitions:
slum tourism - tourism in financially distressed countries
poverty - living on less than $2.37 a day

First, who are affected by poverty and what does it mean for them? Right now, more than three billion people live in on less than $3.14 a day, and one billion of those people are children. In addition, 805 million people are food insecure and 750 million people lack access to clean drinking water, causing a total of 842 000 deaths a year. This correlates to 165 million children under the age of five getting stunted, due to chronic malnutrition in 2011. Secondly, how does slum tourism help change all this? There are many charities that help with poverty. For example, the Against Malaria Foundation donates every single penny to help kids from getting malaria, amounting to a total of 29 million nets donated to various countries so far. Another great charity is the END Fund, which helped treat more than 140 million people suffering from neglected tropical diseases, including the 10 000 surgeries provided.

You already know from my previous contention that poverty is dangerous. But how do people know about these charities? Well first, some tour organizations directly donate their profit to charities, so not all people have to donate to charities, for example, Reality Tours and Travel directly donate over 80% of their profit to leading charities and back to the community. Now, what about the rest of the people? Well in almost all tours, at the end, the tour guide will recommend you to donate to a leading charity. So there is already a high chance of donations.

1) http://realitytoursandtravel.com...
2) http://www.globalissues.org...
3) https://www.dosomething.org...
4) https://www.unicef.org...
Amphia

Con

For their first contention, the Pro provided a laundry list of the effects of poverty. While these are all true and unfortunate, I do not believe that slum tourism does not help the poor, at least not long-term.

That argument was mainly was about charities that combat poverty and how slum tourism also combats poverty by encouraging donations. I have two problems with this.
1. The Pro is exaggerating the benefits of slum tourism
2. Charities do not help the poor long-term

1. As an article by Forbes says:

"As far as who makes the money from these tours, Ways claims that, Tour operators promise they give money to the people there but in comparison to what they themselves are earning, it's a pittance. Frenzel concurred that the direct economic stimulation in the communities from these tours is negligible. What adds to that is that these tours are often combined with some notion of charity. So the tour operator will say some of the money you give us will flow into a project here in the neighborhood, or we'll do this, or we'll do that with some of your money. Or we employ local guides," Frenzel explained. "[But] so very little of the money that is spent on these tours actually ends up in the places being visited."

https://www.forbes.com...

The benefits are highly over-hyped and not as amazing as the Pro would lead yo to believe.

2. And even if a lot of people donate, charities do not help the poor long-term. You mentioned how some charities try to stop malaria, treat people suffering form disease, and give money to the community. And other charities also donate food. This is nice and all but this does not address the roots of poverty and relieves responsibility from the government. Instead of equipping people with the tools to solve their own problems, charities temporarily "solve" a problem (and only for a portion of people). And then when the charities leave, they feel good about themselves without realizing that after the resources run out, the people are still poor. I am not saying charity is inherently bad, I am saying it is not a long-term solution and I only wish people would stop treating it like one.

In essence what I am saying the following:
1. The slum tours do not make very much money int eh first place, so it is hard to put that into the community even if they want to
2. If they make a lot of profits, these do not usually end up in the community. As you mentioned n the comments, these tours are profiting off of poverty
3. If these slum torus are good people and have enough profits that they give tot he community, this charity is not a long-term solution to poverty. It does not truly help poor people.

Here are some extra points:

"Slum tours treat people like animals in a zoo - you stare from the outside but don't dare get too close."

"Visitors aren't interested in meaningful interaction; they just want their photo op. Contact with locals is minimal."

"Money rarely trickles down. Instead, operators fill their pockets but the vaunted 'benefits to the community' don't materialize. Slum tourism profits from poverty."

"People feel degraded by being stared at doing mundane things - washing, cleaning up, preparing food, things that are private. Their rights to privacy may be violated. Imagine yourself at the receiving end: how would you feel?"

"Even when they participate as hosts, local people are often underpaid and exploited."

"The image of a country may be tarnished by publicizing slums (this is an actual concern among certain segments of certain populations - usually the more wealthy)."

"The tours make poverty exotic, otherworldly, almost glamorizing what to inhabitants is a harsh reality which will remain once the tourists are long gone."

https://www.women-on-the-road.com...
Debate Round No. 1
CyberneticHacker

Pro

Welcome back. Before I get into my own reasons why slum tourism actually does help the poor, I would first like to disprove my opponent, while supporting my own points.

1) My opponent stated that not all the money donated makes it back to the community

True, but at the end of a slum tour, one of two things will happen: the tour organization will directly donate some of its profit to a charity (for example Reality Tours and Travel directly donates 80% of their profit back into the community), or you will donate to a charity (for example, at the end of a tour from Smokey Tours, you can donate not only money, but food, water, and other goods that will go straight back to the locals). So no, I am not exaggerating the benefits of slum tourism. In tours, people do actually donate to the community. And the quote my opponent stated was not covering the entire story. Even though on some tours very little money is used to help the community, some money always goes toward the community, and even a little amount can make a huge difference.

2) My opponent stated that even if people do donate, the charities don't make a lasting difference

What my opponent didn't realize is that charities stay in one place. They don't come to a community, leave the next day, and never return again. Also, even a one-time aid can have a lasting effect. The charity might teach English, sports, livelihood skills, soft skills, etc. Those things last. And even if the charity doesn't return, there are still many more charities to come. For example, Concern Worldwide is a leading charity that in 2016, reached over one million people directly, and 4.7 million indirectly with their livelihood programs. Also, Concern Worldwide educated 1.6 million people in reading in 2016. In addition, Reality Gives has fully educated more than 400 students in English, computer skills, and soft skills.

3) My opponent ended off with some quotes that mainly stated that slum tourism treats humans like animals on display

But those accounts were of people that did not accompany tour organizations. In a tour organization, there are strict rules, for example, no photographs. The tour organizers will also monitor individuals very carefully. My opponent also quoted, "Visitors aren't interested in meaningful interaction; they just want their photo op. Contact with locals is minimal." First, like I just said, some tours don't allow photographs, and secondly, contact with locals is not minimal. Reality Tours and Travel ensures this. They spend hours walking through the streets greeting locals. One local even said this: "Yes, we feel very good about this. They give 80% back to the community. It"s very useful, because children will get good education and they can do something in their life... It"s good, because they are earning money to help the people in the slum." This next quote proves that not all slum tours are about harassment: "There is no influence at all [from the tours]. We are busy with our own work and they are busy with their things. But we are quite happy, because tourists here in India are guests, and guests are treated like gods. When the people talk politely with me, I talk politely with them. There is no problem or influence at all." The next quote backs the previous quote up. It proves that the locals don't mind slum tours, so much so that they don't even bother to ask why they are here. "Now we feel really good about them coming here. We feel proud. Sometimes they say "hi, hello" to our kids. We don"t have much of an idea why they come here. Maybe they come for some research or something."

In my next section, I will be presenting to you some more facts and statements on why slum tourism is a good thing in two arguments.

1) Poverty

Poverty is a huge deal, and slum tourism can directly affect it. But how big of a deal is poverty? Right now, more than three billion people live in on less than $3.14 a day, and one billion of those people are children. In addition, 805 million people are food insecure and 750 million people lack access to clean drinking water, causing a total of 842 000 deaths a year. This correlates to 165 million children under the age of five getting stunted, due to chronic malnutrition in 2011.

2) Slum tours

Now you know why poverty is such a big deal, so I will now be explaining how slum tours help fight off poverty. In a slum tour, your worldview changes. That change can make the difference between a donation, or a pass. And when you donate, happy things can happen. Like I said earlier, there are many tour organizations that directly help with fighting off poverty. For example, at the end of a tour given by Smokey Tours, you will be given the chance to donate food, water, and other goods you think the locals might need. In addition, slum tours donate to charities, which like I said earlier, can have a voluminous effect on eradicating poverty by teaching various skills, including computer and soft skills.
Amphia

Con

Hello again, I will refute my opponents points this round. In round 3 I will not rebut, I will only crystallize my arguments. I ask that my opponent does this same (though you do not have to if you feel it is absolutely necessary to refute. Just know I will not be following suit).

1)
In this point my opponent makes the argument that the tour organization will give some of its profits to charity (bringing up Reality Tours and Travel) or the tourists will donate food, water, and other goods. As I said previously, the profits these tour companies make are very low. So we have two problems here:

a). The profits going back into the community are very small. My opponent argues that even a little can make a difference. However, let's think about this logically for a moment. If a company makes very little profits this means the community does not get much money from the tours. If they do not get much money, then very little people are benefited. This also means the very few benefited are also benefited very insignificantly.

b). This ties in with point a: my opponent mentions how the tourists can donate food, water, and other goods. Going back to what I said before, this money, these goods are not solving poverty long-term. Have you ever heard the Chinese saying "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."? This is incredibly accurate, instead of just giving finite supplies, we need to be helping the poor in more sustainable ways. So yes, you are exaggerating the benefits of slum tourism.

2)
My opponent is correct in that charities do not get up and leave after one day but this does not mean they stay in one area forever. They also said a charity might teach English, sports, livelihood skills, and soft skills, Concern Worldwide being an organization that does this. I looked into them being honest, they seem okay. HOWEVER, just because charities like Concern Worldwide exist does not mean slum tours donate to them. And even if they do, slum tours still don't make much money to give to such charities. Concern Worldwide operates regardless of slum tours. Concern is the one helping the poor, not slum tours (and their contributions to charities like Concern are likely very little).

3)
Perhaps the quotes were a bit...dramatic for lack of better word. However, you argument is essentially that because Reality Tours and Travel is so amazing, other slum tours must be as well. This is generalizing and probably untrue as well. The quotes you provided were some people who were "satisfied" out of the many different tours available, just because some locals don't mind or were happy does not mean all of them were. And EVEN if people don't mind the the tourists and pictures are not allowed anywhere (though you yourself said only some tours have this rule) AND if contact with locals is not minimal AND there is no harassment---that doesn't mean slum tourism helps the poor! As I said before, very little money is going back to the community, and whatever does is minimal, and charities generally do not solve for poverty in the long-term.

Onto my opponents arguments:

1) Poverty
This argument was essentially that poverty is widespread and awful. I totally agree with this, everyone does, but as I keep saying, slum tours barely do anything to help solve this in the long-term.

2) Slum tours
It is true that slum tours expand your worldview but that only benefits you. Yes, you might donate and the other things you mentioned might happen, but just read what I have previously said as a response to this argument.
Debate Round No. 2
CyberneticHacker

Pro

Hello again. Unfortunately, I will not just be summarizing my arguments, I will also point out some flaws in my opponent's speech. In your last speech, feel free to do anything you want. Moving on, in my first section, I will be pointing out some fatal flaws in my opponent's speech, then in my second section, instead of bringing up new ideas and arguments, I will be summarizing and crystallizing my previous arguments.

1) My opponent said that the benefits of slum tourism are not long lasting, and it only benefits a small group of people.

First, I will talk about the first part of his statement, "the benefits of slum tourism are not long lasting". I have a few problems with this. A) Giving supplies to someone will always be a short-term fix. Judging from what you said, then we should cancel all food and water donations. That can't be right! Even though the materials last for a short period of time, it can still mean happiness and hope to the receiver. B) My opponent seemed to miss when I said "a total of 29 million nets donated to various countries". That's right. The donation is not a one-time donation. Those mosquito nets will last a long time. Also, the charities might teach skills, for example, in 2016, Concern Worldwide reached over one million people directly, and over 4.7 million people indirectly with their livelihood programs. And my opponent said that "teaching a man how to fish will feed him forever", applying that the skill is not lost. So if you apply the same logic to skill teaching, you get this: "teach a man livelihood skills will help him for a lifetime".

2) My opponent stated that even though Concern Worldwide (and many other charities) help fight poverty, people on a slum tour might not even donate to it, so most of the charity information I've talked about is useless.

Yes, many people don't even know that that charity exists. But during a slum tour, you get to experience poverty first hand. You feel bad for the people and you want to help them. So when you go home, guess what you are going to do? "Siri, what are the best charities that help fight poverty?"

Now I will be summarizing on my arguments made in my previous speeches.

1) Slum tourism indirectly helps with poverty

Reminder, why is poverty such a big deal? Right now, more than three billion people live in on less than $3.14 a day, and one billion of those people are children. In addition, 805 million people are food insecure and 750 million people lack access to clean drinking water, causing a total of 165 million children under the age of five to get stunted, due to chronic malnutrition in 2011. Secondly, how does slum tourism help change all this? There are many charities that help with poverty. For example, the Against Malaria Foundation donates every single penny to help kids from getting malaria, amounting to a total of 29 million nets donated to various countries so far. Another great charity is the END Fund, which helped treat more than 140 million people suffering from neglected tropical diseases, including the 10 000 surgeries provided.

2) Slum tourism directly helps with poverty

First, why chose a slum tour as information to donate? Because you directly see the poverty. On a book or the TV, the information may be biased, and sometimes diluted. But going on a slum tour opens your eye directly to poverty. You get to almost experience it. Secondly, you already know that slum tourism is a great way to raise awareness of poverty, but what can people do to donate? Well first, some tour organizations directly donate their profit to charities, so not all people have to donate to charities, for example, Reality Tours and Travel directly donate over 80% of their profit to leading charities and back to the community. Now, what about the rest of the people? Well in almost all tours, at the end, the tour guide will recommend you to donate to a leading charity. For example, at the end of every tour from Smokey Tours, you will be given the chance to donate not only money, but food, water, and other goods you think the locals might need.
Amphia

Con

I kind of am tired of repeating the same thing over and over, so I will not be refuting my opponent's arguments this round.

I believe that slum tourism does not help the poor for 3 reasons:

1. Slum tours make very little profits.
Even if they want to place that money in the community, there is very little to do so. And even if people do donate separately of the tour, slum tourism is still growing as an industry which means its audience is also small. 1 million people went on a slum tour in 2014, that is not much considering the amount of tourists in the world--thus the donations sent t0 charities are also small in number.

(https://www.citymetric.com...)

2. Often, profits do not end up back in the community. There are stories of communities being toured and then not receiving any money in return. Stories of locals hosting such tours and barely making anything, if at all. I will admit, this could be because of the little profits made in the first place. Either way, the community is not benefited very much.

3. Even if the slum tours are good and the profits go to charity, this is not a long-term solution to poverty. It does not truly help poor people. I am not saying that we should stop charity, I am saying that it is NOT sustainable.
Debate Round No. 3
11 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by CyberneticHacker 3 years ago
CyberneticHacker
Good job. I really liked this debate (cause it's my first).
Posted by Amphia 3 years ago
Amphia
Oh nevermind, for some reason it did not show your 2nd round
Posted by CyberneticHacker 3 years ago
CyberneticHacker
okay
Posted by Amphia 3 years ago
Amphia
You rebut me in your 2nd round. And then 3rd round should be crystallization of arguments.
Posted by CyberneticHacker 3 years ago
CyberneticHacker
For round three, do you want to do a rebuttal (you summarize on your arguments, but no new information may be introduced) or do you want to have another regular round where you state your points, etc.?
Posted by Amphia 3 years ago
Amphia
Oh, so companies show people slums? And people willingly do this? I didn't know that was a thing. I don't know too much about slum tourism but I do disagree with the charity aspect.
Posted by CyberneticHacker 3 years ago
CyberneticHacker
But a downside is that companies are profiting from the poor.
Posted by CyberneticHacker 3 years ago
CyberneticHacker
At the end of slum tours, you get the chance to donate to a charity. Or the tour organization will lend off some of its profit directly to a charity.
Posted by Amphia 3 years ago
Amphia
How does slum tourism and charity connect? If you tell me I will debate you.
Posted by Amphia 3 years ago
Amphia
Never mind, sorry, my eyes skipped over your definitions. I know what slum tourism is now haha. I still disagree with charity as a way to solve poverty though.
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