The Instigator
Briss
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Con (against)
Anonymous
Tied
0 Points

Socrates deserved to die at his trial

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/23/2018 Category: Philosophy
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 453 times Debate No: 119136
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

Briss

Pro

This question is inspired by a passage I came across in Nietzsche's "Beyond Good and Evil", Which asked (and with a tone suggesting his implication) whether Socrates deserved to be killed by the Athenian court for is allegations. I'm undecided on my personal position so I will play Devil's Advocate. My first point will be that yes, According to what is known of Greek history, Socrates mentored some members of the Thirty Tyrants, And that is a crime worthy of death. I can't wait to hear my opponent's argument :)

Con

The crime Socrates was convicted for was teaching people in Athens to think for themselves which today would be perfectly fine, But back then, People were just expected to blindfully obey the government. We probably both agree that people should have the right to think for themselves, But nonetheless, It was against the law. At that time you were supposed to just let the government do all of the thinking for you and just submit to them. I would say that the right thing is still the right thing even if it is against the law.

Even if what Socrates did was wrong, I don't believe it is a crime that deserved death. Maybe a fine at most.

I look forward to your argument.
Debate Round No. 1
Briss

Pro

I appreciate your response and respect your point of view.

First off, I will confirm that I am in agreement with you in that I believe people should have the right to think for themselves.

I should also probably elaborate on the premise of the argument. I agree with you in that even if Socrates was doing wrong in Athens he should not have been condemned to death. Perhaps a better, More accurate idea of what I was trying to get at in my debate topic was whether or not what Socrates was doing (which caused for his trial and death) was wrong.

"The crime Socrates was convicted for was teaching people in Athens to think for themselves which today would be perfectly fine. " According to Plato's Republic (and straight out of the mouths of many of his accusers) the main crimes Socrates was convicted for were as follows: rejecting the religious teachings of Athens and introducing his own, Mentoring members of the Thirty Tyrants (the pro-Spartan oligarch that killed over 5% of the Athenian population in their few months of power) with anti-democratic views, And indoctrinating children with anti-democratic views. Sure you could argue that the third premise coincides with the point you just made, But the other two are legitimate (the first one not so much through a modern context, But the second one yes).

"Back then, People were just expected to blindly (don't mean to be nitpicky but I am a bit of a grammar Nazi; blindfully isn't a word) obey the government. " This is not actually true. The governing system during Socrates's trial was the Athenian democracy (populist, Not elitist), Which collectively voted on all major city doings and affairs, So unless you are insinuating that people were expected to blindly follow themselves, You would be wrong on that account. It is true that only 30% of Athenians were allowed to participate in government affairs (because women and slaves were not allowed to participate), But it is also true that Socrates never taught any individuals belonging to these groups, And thus these groups are irrelevant to the context of the debate.

"But nonetheless, It was against the law. At that time you were supposed to just let the government do all of the thinking for you and just submit to them. I would say that the right thing is still the right thing even if it is against the law. " Once again, Socrates's accusers were the law and the government. Socrates wasn't condemned for free thinking. He was condemned A) for holding beliefs that rejected the religious beliefs of Athens (not necessarily something you can blame the Athenians for, As they believed the gods would punish them if they did not worship them and hold them in great esteem) and B) for mentoring some of the nastiest, Most brutal tyrants to exist in all of history. It's like if you were to find a mentor who indoctrinated Hitler with the views that led to his terrible legacy; would he/she deserve an appropriate punishment? I agree that the right thing is the right thing even if it is against the law

"Even if what Socrates did was wrong, I don't believe it is a crime that deserved death. Maybe a fine at most. " I agree. Maybe more than a fine but certainly not death. I apologize for the confusion; if you'd like to take this as a win because technically you have won by specifications of the debate that is fair. If you'd like to continue the debate under the more accurate premise I have specified I would love to.

Looking forward to your rebuttal :)
Debate Round No. 2
Briss

Pro

Fair enough. . . I'll provide another opportunity for you to respond but if you would rather not that is fine as well

Thank you for your time :)
Debate Round No. 3
Briss

Pro

Briss forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
Briss

Pro

Briss forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
No comments have been posted on this debate.
No votes have been placed for this debate.

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use.