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MT55
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The Contender
SD22
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The Legal Driving Age Should Not be 14

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/9/2018 Category: Cars
Updated: 5 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 430 times Debate No: 113685
Debate Rounds (3)
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MT55

Pro

Many people have argued that the driving age should be lowered to ages as low as fourteen-years-old, however, due to their immaturity, underdeveloped minds, and the lethal consequences they face, the legal driving age should not be fourteen.
Adolescents are immature, while some may be more mature than others, it does not change the fact that most teenagers are immature. For example, according to Guardchild, a software company, in a survey they did within the past 10 years,"56% of teenagers admit to talking on their phone while driving and 13% admit to texting while driving". To further support the claim, in the same survey done by Guardchild, "21% of fatal car crashes involving teenagers between 16 and 19 were the result of phone usage. This result has been expected to grow as much as 4% every year". With the rates of teenage phone usage while driving and fatal car crashes already so high, and expecting to increase every year, these rates are likely to be even higher if the legal driving age was reduced. Now that death rates have been mentioned, this leads into the next claim, the lethal consequences. According to Allstate, in an article they published in 2012, driving accidents are the leading cause of death for people under the age of 14, with more than 4,000 deaths every year. Even worse is that the younger the driver, the higher the risk of them getting in a fatal accident is. This is supported by a list published by CBS News on the most dangerous states for teen drivers, South Dakota, which has the lowest age to get a restricted licence, at 14 and 6 month, has a teen driver death rate 149% higher than the national average. On the other hand, according to WalletHub's Top 10 Best & Worst States for Teen Drivers, New Jersey, which has the highest age to get a restricted licence at age 17, is ranked within the top 10 best states for teen drivers. Finally, adolescents' brains are not as developed as the brain of an adult. According to the Medical Center at Rochester University, the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25. The Medical Center at Rochester University also stated that adults think with the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that responds to situations with good judgement and considers long-term effects, while teenagers think with the amygdala, the emotional part of the brain. With adolescents more likely to be emotional and make irrational and sudden decisions based on emotion, giving them a position behind the wheel would not be foolish, but dangerous as well.

https://www.guardchild.com...
https://blog.allstate.com...
https://www.cbsnews.com...
https://wallethub.com...
https://www.urmc.rochester.edu...
SD22

Con

The legal driving age should be fourteen-years-old due to teenagers nowadays needing the ability to be more prepared. At the age of 16 teenagers are expected to have jobs and many other responsibilities, which they are expected to go to and from theirselves. Many people do not have the time to get their permit or license before the age of 18, leaving them behind. If the permit age was 14, and the license age was 15, then people would have more time to prepare for the common driving that they would have to do, and since people under 16 still require a parent with them to drive, they would still be able to have 1 year under their belt, which would be the same as otherwise, but they would be given an extra year before they needed to get a job , which gives them more time to be prepared to be driving on an every day basis. Some teenagers who are fourteen have hardships going on in their lives as well. According to DMV, in order to apply for a Junior Permit, you must : Submit a Driver's License or Identification Card Application (Form DL 44), complete an Application for Junior Permit(Form DL 120) and depending on the hardship you're claiming, the form requires signatures from your parent/guardian, and also potentially from your school principal or employer. There are many steps that have to be taken in order to get a license. According to DMV, in order to get a license people must go through or take a drivers ed class where they decide if the person is ready or not to take the Permit test, from there on depending on the instructor of the drivers ed course, the person must drive so many hours with the instructor in order for them to sign off that the student has taken the course and is prepared for this major responsibility. People then have to go to the Department Of Motor Vehicles where they are tested on driving instructions to see if they are ready and prepared to be able to drive. With this being said, if they pass the test then that already proves that they're competent enough to drive. In an article published by NBC Chicago, "a new study by AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety confirmed that millennials can"t seem to put down their cellphones, even when they"re behind the wheel. After surveying over 2,500 Americans, AAA concluded that 19- to 24-year-olds are more inclined than any other age group, including teens, to check their phones for texts while in the driver"s seat. Millennial drivers also aren"t as supportive of legislation aimed at stemming distractions while on the road, and they"re more likely to normalize texting and driving than other groups. In all, 88.4 percent of respondents from ages 19-24 reported engaging in dangerous behaviors like texting, speeding and red-light running. That compared to 79.2 percent for people 25-39 and 69.3 percent for 16- to 18-year-olds. In an article done by Kalina K., East Setauket, and published on October 16, 2009, she stated the importance of teens being able to drive at a younger age as well as this statement " Whether it"s driving to school, work, or running errands, a car always comes in handy to make daily tasks easier for the entire family. When you are still in high school, independence on the road is important". Sports, and many other after school activities can put a teenager in danger if their parents do not pick them up before a certain time in the afternoon. With this being said, the legal driving age should be fourteen.
http://www.teenink.com......
https://www.nbcchicago.com......
https://www.dmv.org......
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Debate Round No. 1
MT55

Pro

While some teens do have jobs, these numbers have actually been declining. According to Derek Thompson from The Atlantic in a 2017 article, "In the summer of 1978, 60 percent of teens were working or looking for work. Last summer, just 35 percent were". These numbers have been decreasing due to the fact that teens have been more focused on their education. In the same article by Derek Thompson, " The percent of recent high-school graduates enrolled in college has grown by 25 percentage points. That is almost exactly the decline in the teenage labor-force participation rate". What exactly would be the point of lowering the age to get a permit if less teens are getting jobs?
Secondly, some families can't afford the costs of drivers ed. According to Cars Direct in 2013, "...between $30 and $180. Actual road training runs between $50 and $150 per session. Most driving schools offer an all-inclusive package between $200 and $800". These costs can seem extremely high for low-income families. According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, around 21%-43% of children in the U.S. live in poverty or come from low-income families. For some of these families, it would be difficult to scrape up enough money to afford classes for a teen who wishes to drive. Speaking of low-income families, how can they afford a car for their teen? According to Greg Gardner from USAToday in a 2015 article, the average price of a used car is $15,900. If even a used car costs that much, and certain families can not afford the costs of drivers ed, there'd be no way for a teen to use a car to go to school, practices, a job, or any other place if they do not have a car to use.

https://www.theatlantic.com...
https://www.carsdirect.com...
http://www.nccp.org...
https://www.usatoday.com...
SD22

Con

My opponent stated that low income families can't afford driving school or cars. According to an article published by "The Atlantic" on June 15, 2016 "MILWAUKEE"Ask conservatives what the poor need to do to get out of poverty, and the answer usually involves something like, "Get a job." That was the crux of the anti-poverty plan Paul Ryan revealed last week to shrugs, and has been the gist of many anti-poverty efforts over the past two decades.But for many people, there is one very specific"and often overlooked"reason why that"s not so easy: They don't have a driver's license.Not all jobs require a driver"s license, particularly those that pay very low wages. But having one is a very common requirement for the sorts of job that can actually lift people out of poverty"those in construction, manufacturing, security, and unions jobs including electricians and plumbers, says Mark Kessenich, who runs WRTP Big Step, a Milwaukee center that trains low-income workers to enter jobs in construction and manufacturing that pay a starting wage of $15 and up."Not having driver"s license and access to reliable transportation is a big issue for us with the industries"utilities, construction, manufacturing," he told me.Sometimes, licenses are required because employers know the jobs will be at sites across a region, and need employees to be able to get there reliably and on time. Other times, licenses are required because employees may need to move cars"a listing for an auto detailer requires a license, for example"or move trucks, at construction sites. Other times, though, the reasons for requiring a driver"s license are a little harder to understand. A quick scan of jobs listed in Milwaukee"s Craiglist emphasizes the point. Valid driver"s licenses are a prerequisite for positions including a retail security officer (pay $10.55 an hour), a caregiver for the disabled ($10 an hour), an eye-care associate, an administrative assistant, and a deli clerk. Licenses, to employers, signal responsibility.""These days, positions use a driver"s license as a proxy for whether you"re employable," says Julie Kerksick, who is a senior policy advocate at Public Policy Institute of Community Advocates in Milwaukee. "It means that there"s fewer and fewer people in the pool of unemployed who can actually qualify."Driver"s license requirements affect many low-income people trying to get into the labor market. But they disproportionately affect people of color. That"s both because minorities are much less likely to have driver"s licenses in the first place and, advocates say, they are also more likely to have their licenses taken away. The result is that many minority job-seekers are disqualified before they even send in an application. According to the Employment and Training Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 75 percent of white 18-year-olds in Wisconsin had driver"s licenses as of January 1, 2016, while just 34 percent of African Americans 18-year-olds did and 33 percent of Hispanics of that age did. Another article published by Live Strong on June 13, 2017 "Teenagers crave independence. As they grow into young adults, they feel the need to spread their wings and venture farther away from the nest. Driving is an important milestone that allows teenagers to transition from childhood into adulthood independently. Having access to a drivers license means that your child can get from point A to point B alone -- and this is of major importance to most teenagers. Remember, your teen will likely be going off to college or joining the workforce in just a few short years, and being confident and independent before a major transition could be beneficial. Imagine a new driver trying to navigate a new city or college campus -- it could be completely overwhelming. This can be avoided by teaching your teen to drive beforehand so that she or he is comfortable with it when the time comes". With this being said, the driving age should be lowered to 14.
https://www.theatlantic.com...
https://www.livestrong.com...
Debate Round No. 2
MT55

Pro

At the end of my opponent's argument, her quote from livestrong stated that, "This can be avoided by teaching your teen to drive beforehand so that she or he is comfortable with it when the time comes". May I remind everyone that the affirmative side is arguing that 14-year-olds should not be allowed to drive legally. Whether or not their parents or guardians help teach them is up to them. In fact, it is actually beneficial for teens and parents are possibly the most important part of a teenager's journey in learning how to drive. According to Toyota Motor Sales Inc. in a 2012 survey involving 5,500 young drivers and their parents, teenagers are more likely to do something they think their parents do while driving, for example; looking for something, write directions down, and dealing with passenger issues. Parents are very important role models for teens as they learn how to drive. It is important for teenagers to have at least a year or two of driving practice under their belts before getting their licences, however, if the legal driving age is lowered to 14, that would mean a child would have to start learning at the ages of 12 or 13, barely even teenagers. As stated before by Rochester University, the brain isn't fully developed until the age 25.
My opponent stated that a some people living in poverty themselves do not have drivers licences, and while that statement is true, "getting a job" is not the answer. According to Henry Grabar from Slate, a magazine company that covers current events, politics, and American culture, in a 2017 article, a man named Shane Moon, a construction worker, ended up homeless after getting his drivers licence suspended. Moon was having a hard time paying all of his bills and taking care of his pregnant girlfriend, he eventually had to let his car insurance lapse but ended up getting fined as that is against the law in Michigan. One thing led to another and now that Moon was without a licence, he made considerably less money and became homeless. As is seen with Moon's story, tragic events such as these are uncontrollable in the lives of many, and "getting a job" is not that simple of a solution and is inapplicable to those like Moon.
In conclusion, not only is getting a permit or licence incredibly difficult for those under 18, especially if they come from low income families, but it is also important for the safety of the young drivers and anyone else on the road if the legal driving ages stayed the same. Parents do have the freedom to begin teaching their children whenever they please, but they must be mindful of what they teach them and be a good example of what a responsible driver is like. With that being said, the legal driving age should not be 14.

http://www.wnd.com...
https://slate.com...
SD22

Con

In the beginning of my opponents argument, he restated my quote and what the affirmative side is arguing even though my quote ties in to the topic on why 14 year olds should be able to drive legally. According to "The Bump" Finding a part-time after-school, weekend or summer job can help your teen learn valuable lessons in responsibility and financial planning. Unless you plan on chauffeuring her back and forth to her retail job at the mall or waitressing job at the local burger joint, driving is a necessity for a working teen. You can pair driving and working as a connected responsibility to teach your teen what it's like to act as an adult, instead of just handing the keys over to her, help your teen to understand that driving is a privilege that comes with many different types of responsibilities. While she is earning her own cash ask her to contribute gas money to the family car to make up for what she uses driving to her job. If she balks at this idea, suggest she use the money to take the bus instead. Chances are that she will choose the comfort of the car over standing at the bus stop.As your teen grows and matures, he may not want to take the school bus with the "little kids" in the younger grades. Unless you live within walking distance, driving is often the only method -- for a child who can't or won't take the bus -- for getting to school. While you can drive your teen to and from school every day, many parents work schedules don't permit this from happening. As long as your teen understands that his car privileges during the academic day consists of going to and home from school, driving himself is a perfectly reasonable mode of transportation for many older teens.If it seems like you are spending your time being a permanent taxi for your kids, shuttling back and forth between soccer, dance and other lessons, let your teen help you out and help driving her siblings to some of their after-school activities. Although your teen most likely has her fair share of extra-curricular activities to attend to, she may have some time to give you a helping hand and take on the carpool. Driving on a schedule that revolves around other people -- namely your younger children"s' -- can help your teen become more responsible and better organized when it comes to keeping track of time.Driving during the teen years your child helps your child working become more independent, According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, on their Healthy Children website. Along with this independence comes more responsibilities and a more adult-like way of acting. Driving can provide your teen with the opportunity to act independently and show just how responsible he is. Instead of putting your child in the passenger seat and taking him to and from every activity, event or social time, the ability for a teen to drive himself allows him to function in a much less dependent way. Additionally, driving safely, getting himself home on time and making sure that the gas tank is full can help your teen to act in more responsible way. If there is an emergency situation and a teen is the only option there are many ways to prepare them. According to "Moss Bros" Like any other emergency situation, driving emergencies are more readily handled with training. It's believed that students who know what a skid feels like and are not paralyzed with fear during one are more likely to keep their composure and get their vehicles under control safely. With this being said, the legal driving age should be 14.
Debate Round No. 3
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