The Instigator
isl
Pro (for)
The Contender
Unshavenknight
Con (against)

The rise of antisocial behaviour in the 21st century is a myth

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/3/2018 Category: Technology
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 775 times Debate No: 113474
Debate Rounds (3)
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isl

Pro

As a longtime researches in psychology and a sometime teacher courses on research methods and statistics, I have become increasingly concerned about how such studies are being interpreted. Although imaging technology has shed interesting new light on brain activity, it is dangerous to presume that snapshots of activity in certain regions of the brain necessarily provide useful information about the causes of thought, feeling and behavior. This essay will be supported with two arguments, which are going to support and show my point of view.
My first argument is connected with my introduction, which is about technology. Technology is a master which is just tricking you and what you get is nothing useful, but what you get is diseases and mental problems, so it is a myth. Like in the 20th and the 19th century people were social, they didn"t have technology addict. But, they were working as a society, building their economy onto the better. Automatically assuming that the brain causes behavior is problematic because we know that an individual genes and environmental history--and even his or her own behavior--mold the brain over time. There is clear evidence that any unique features that may exist in the brains of teens--to the limited extent that such features exist--are the result of social influences rather than the cause of teen turmoil. As you will see, a careful look at relevant data shows that the teen brain we read about in the headlines--the immature brain that supposedly causes teen problems--is nothing more than a myth.
Unshavenknight

Con

Due to the level of technology available to children, entertainment is no longer a social activity, as it is becoming easier to entertain yourself without other people than in the past. Before modern day technology, if you wanted to be entertained you had to make friends that lived near you today, causing kids to develop social skills quickly. Nowadays, children can entertain themselves with technology, and thus, the need for developed social skills is disappearing.
Debate Round No. 1
isl

Pro

As a longtime researches in psychology and a sometime teacher courses on research methods and statistics, I have become increasingly concerned about how such studies are being interpreted. Although imaging technology has shed interesting new light on brain activity, it is dangerous to presume that snapshots of activity in certain regions of the brain necessarily provide useful information about the causes of thought, feeling and behavior. This essay will be supported with two arguments, which are going to support and show my point of view.
My first argument is connected with my introduction, which is about technology. Technology is a master which is just tricking you and what you get is nothing useful, but what you get is diseases and mental problems, so it is a myth. Like in the 20th and the 19th century people were social, they didn"t have technology addict. But, they were working as a society, building their economy onto the better. Automatically assuming that the brain causes behavior is problematic because we know that an individual genes and environmental history--and even his or her own behavior--mold the brain over time. There is clear evidence that any unique features that may exist in the brains of teens--to the limited extent that such features exist--are the result of social influences rather than the cause of teen turmoil. As you will see, a careful look at relevant data shows that the teen brain we read about in the headlines--the immature brain that supposedly causes teen problems--is nothing more than a myth.
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Debate Round No. 2
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Debate Round No. 3
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