The Instigator
Blessed_Ravon
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
TwentyOneTrees
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Water Is Wet

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/19/2018 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 997 times Debate No: 119526
Debate Rounds (3)
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Blessed_Ravon

Pro

Greetings. Thanks to whoever accepts the debate.

I am Pro (water is wet)

And my opponent (Con) will explain how water is not wet.

Convince me otherwise. May we have a great debate. My opponent has the first word.
TwentyOneTrees

Con

Water: an area of H20 (Sorry, The subscript 2 does not work)

Wet: covered in water or another liquid

When we use the word water, We are talking about any of the water molecules in the area. Lets call our area of water, The Puddle. When we say The Puddle is wet, That is not possible, Because any water that would make the puddle wet is included in The Puddle. Therefore, Water can not be wet.
Debate Round No. 1
Blessed_Ravon

Pro

Thank you for accepting the debate.

Before we begin, I must add that I'm sure that we both agree that yes, Water does make other things wet. The definition of wetness as told by Google is as follows: Wetness is the state or condition of being covered or saturated with water or another liquid. (1) Water makes other things wet, And actually not all things become wet from water. Things become wet when they interact with water.

"You can't pour water on water and make it wet"

A. Therefore many are arguing, That under that stance, Water can't be wet.

"Water makes things wet. But is it wet when it's alone? "

A. Water makes things wet because it clings.

B. Wetness has to do with surface tension and that means there needs to be an interaction between two substances.

C. According to chemist, Richard Saykally, Water is wet because of tetra-hydro hydrogen bonding. (2)

On to my argument. Now that I have discussed how water does make other things wet, I will explain how water itself is wet:

A. According to the Miriam-Webster dictionary, Wet is defined by consisting of; containing; covered with; or soaked with liquid. (3)

B. As we all know, Water has two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom, Otherwise known as H2O which makes a water molecule. H2O does consist of H2O, So by that definition, Water is indeed wet.

C. Backtracking to "Is water wet when it's alone? " Water does stick to itself in the same way that it sticks to other molecules. Water is water molecules stuck onto other water molecules, In other words, Not only does water make objects wet, But water itself makes water wet. Water wouldn't be present without it's trillions of molecules. Furthermore, An ocean, Puddle, Lake, Or any body of water is wet.

Regardless of the contrasting definitions provided by both Google and Miriam Webster -- according to scientists, Water is most definitely wet.

Sources:

Unfortunately sources 1-3 aren't going through. Sorry for the inconvenience. I don't think the website will let me post any links. But I provided explanations and definitions in my argument, So nonetheless.

Round 2 response submitted.
TwentyOneTrees

Con

I would agree that water makes things wet :).

For your argument:
A. This is legit
C. See part 2 of my rebuttal.

Part 1:
Water: a singular noun specifying a group of H2O molecules

Wet: (Like you said, Consisting of; containing; covered with; or soaked with liquid. )

Water can not be wet, Because it can not contain, Be covered by, Or soaked with water that is not itself.

Part 2:
If you would prefer a more scientific way to say this:

According to UCSB Science Line:

"Whether an object is wet or dry depends on a balance between cohesive and adhesive forces. "

"how wet a surface is depends on the balance between these two forces. If the adhesive forces (liquid-solid) are bigger than the cohesive forces (liquid-liquid)"

For something to be wet, The adhesive forces have to greater than the cohesive forces. (1)

Let's scale this down a huge amount and say we have two H2O molecules connected to a third via hydrogen bonds. You would say that since there are two water molecules covering the third molecule, It is wet.
The water is not wet though, Because there is not a adhesive force that is greater than the cohesive forces.

Sources:
1. http://scienceline. Ucsb. Edu/getkey. Php? Key=6097
Debate Round No. 2
Blessed_Ravon

Pro

I would like to thank my opponent for a good response and well thought out argument. Also, Nice source.

"Water can not be wet, Because it can not contain, Be covered by, Or soaked with water that is not itself. " -- I will reuse my previous point.

Water is wet because of tetra-hydro hydrogen bonding. <--

Water does stick to itself in the same way that it sticks to other molecules. Water is water molecules stuck onto other water molecules, In other words, Not only does water make objects wet, But water itself makes water wet. Water wouldn't be present without it's trillions of molecules. Furthermore, An ocean, Puddle, Lake, Or any body of water is wet. <--

In closing: This was a good debate. Again, You have my thanks. I noticed you just joined this website, The same as I. May we have a great experience on debate. Org

Round 3 response submitted.
TwentyOneTrees

Con

TwentyOneTrees forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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