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katkat517
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The Contender
og_instigator
Con (against)
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anglo-saxons have lost their culture to the pop culture industry

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/5/2018 Category: Arts
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 417 times Debate No: 119328
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katkat517

Pro

If you are an Anglo-Saxon living in U. S. A. Or Canada, Or England and you were asked to describe your culture, What could you say aside from naming some current actor or actress, Or some flash-in-the-pan pop singer?
This does not a culture make.
With everyone glued to the goggle box, They have neglected their local traditions. For example, There used to be music in pubs, But now there is always a television. Before T. V. People used to gather together at square dances, Fairs, And music gatherings. Instead, Everyone sits at home isolated from their community, And watches T. V. For hours on end.
Is television that great? You've got true crime (which leaves you with dark negative feelings afterwards), The latest terrorist on the news (happy and uplifting stuff. NOT), And home buying and renovation shows till they're coming out of your ears. AND you PAY for this!
What was culture like hundreds of years ago, Let's say around Yuletide in England?
People would go door-to-door wassailing, Singing songs and they would have a wassail bowl to collect food and drink, Then go around waking up the apple trees for the new year by pouring drink over their roots and firing guns into the air. They would go to someone's house where there would be a Christmas pudding with two items placed into it, And whichever male and female found one of these items, They would be the King and Queen of the revels. They would make a program of entertainments for the 12 days of Christmas --blind-man's-buff, Hide-and-seek, Musical chairs etc. Wonderful old songs from hundreds of years ago would be played and sung. There was continuity with their culture of old.
The old traditions would link people to the time of year and Nature. Much of this has been lost.
og_instigator

Con

I, Too, Have been baffled by the response people often give to a question of their culture: they reply with what they believe describes their culture; however, They often misconstrue their cultural identity as a result of a lack of knowledge or upbringing within the respective culture. That, However, Is where you and I differ; one cannot be expected to understand the culture of a people who lived centuries ago. The fact is that society has evolved into something new, Something which has positive and negative intricacies as the ones before it. While I can agree with you that a good majority of today's entertainment is simple cash grab and lack substance, The other facet of this day and age is the prevalence of knowledge and communication. With such a great gift, People are likely to misuse and waste it away by lounging about on useless forms of pleasure; however, The good that can be accomplished by it is far beyond anything achievable in any age before today's. In response to your last assertion about the loss of connectivity to the world and its various values, I disagree strongly on the basis that we are more connected than we have ever been, And it's all achievable within the blink of an eye.
Debate Round No. 1
katkat517

Pro

katkat517 forfeited this round.
og_instigator

Con

og_instigator forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
katkat517

Pro

Sorry I missed a round, I use library internet and can't always make it to the library, Sorry again.
Anyway, You brought up some interesting points: Yes you're right, One cannot expect people to understand or even know the culture of a people who lived centuries ago, But books, And people talking about it on shows about culture can teach them about what it was like in the past.
Certain elements of the past can be revived. It has happened before: a man named Winstanley in England in the 1660's brought back many Yule elements into society petitioning King Charles the second to do so. We can thank Winstanley for bringing back carols and Christmas celebrations altogether (they had been banned by Oliver Cromwell).
You mentioned about technology. Yes, Technology IS our culture. It's sad to see people glued to their gadgets, Even when they are walking with a stroller or with their spouse, They seem to prefer being online than socializing with family.
Yes, It's true our society has evolved into something new, But that "new" has no depth or quality. There are many sites on every subject, Yet how truthful is the information there. Everything seems to be geared towards making money, And truth goes by the wayside. One can ask "But what is truth? " this might apply to philosophical arguments, But when it comes to science, There should be truth which has been arrived at by experiment, Yet on many sites to do with science, Or more particularly, Medicine, Truth is sacrificed to the almighty dollar so that pharmaceutical companies can make their dough.
True, There are positive uses for the internet, Like for promoting animal rights and human rights through petitions. These issues could not have made progress so quickly without the internet. The internet is a gift if used thoughtfully.
And the internet is touted as a tool for anyone to get their voice heard, Unfortunately one voice is like a grain of sand on the beach, Lost in the billions of other voices out there. Now you have to pay more and more money to get your voice heard to get a high rating for your site.
Speaking of connectivity, It is perhaps a paradox, But even though there is more virtual connectivity with cell phones, Email, Etc. , Real connectivity (in person) in friendships and relationships I believe is less. People have lost the ability to form or maintain these. Relationships don't last, Families are breaking apart.
Anyway, Back to culture itself. I read books about my lost culture. My husband and I try to recreate some of our lost culture. I have been studying ancient music for over 25 years trying to understand what music was like for Europeans long ago, What it sounded like, How was it created. I have discovered that it was a wholly different kind of musical system than we have. I guess I am a revivalist. There are many of us around. There are many people on YouTube trying to recreate what ancient music sounded like (I have one piece of music up there under Ancient Roman Music, I know this is a bit of bragging, Sorry). My husband studies languages, Trying to understand the mindset of many cultures through their expressions, Sayings, Choice of words; then tracing through the various languages where these come from (as much as he can). I tell him he should write a book, Or post his findings somewhere, Actually he writes to penfriends all around the world and shares some of his knowledge that way.
I'm thinking that there should be a site devoted to reviving aspects of lost Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, European, Or any culture, For those who want it because they feel the loss of their culture particularly keenly.
It is surprising when you talk to people, That they somehow know intuitionally (maybe it is some form of genetic ancestral memory, Or collective unconscious thing) they have lost something culturally -- mention the Druids to anyone and their curiosity is peaked. The culture of the Druids may have been idealized, Though when you consider that the average lifespan back then was about 40 years, And they spent half of it (in ancient records they say Druids spent 20 years) in educating their people, There must have been a vast body of knowledge there. Just their forms of poetry alone were very sophisticated, Rich, Full of magical correspondences and allusions, And their art, Well we have examples early Celtic art and it is very complex with its incredible spirals and swirls as well as incredibly beautiful. This is the great loss that people sense.
I have some Irish blood, And I yearn for what my ancestors had, And this yearning cannot be satisfied with what modernity has to offer, Namely technology and communication, Even as quick as a blink of an eye. Maybe my age has something to do with it. I'm in my 50's and it surprises Me even how much I hanker after the "golden good old days". I remember rolling my eyes when I was younger when my father used to tell me how great it was in the past. Now I'm just like that, I never thought I would become like that, But time has a way of making you become that way the older you get.
Another point is how newer technologies change the human brain (shortening the attention span for one). Even when they first brought in typewriters long ago, People noticed that their sentences lost the beautiful elongated flow they used to have, And were replaced by more terse, Less graceful sentences.
But I guess it depends on your values and priorities -- whether the loss of these things are important to you or not.
Maybe if more people investigated the subject, And showed the world what cultural losses we have suffered, Then more people might be interested in at least some revivalist reborn old culture.
og_instigator

Con

og_instigator forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
katkat517

Pro

katkat517 forfeited this round.
og_instigator

Con

og_instigator forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
katkat517

Pro

katkat517 forfeited this round.
og_instigator

Con

og_instigator forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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