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The Unappreciated Egomaniac

s-anthony
Posts: 3,462
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5/30/2018 3:02:20 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
Just because a beneficiary appreciates a benefactor for his good deeds does not necessarily mean the benefactor feels appreciated. The mistake, I believe, so often made, is assuming showing appreciation translates into feeling appreciated. Often, people who are egomaniacs tend to overestimate their benefit to others. Consequently, even though beneficiaries may show appropriate appreciation, because they've overestimated themselves as benefactors, they underestimate the appreciation of their beneficiaries.

Feeling unappreciated, they become jaded not only to the point of discontinuing their contributions, but, also, to the point of retribution.

They feel as though they have been rejected by society and become envious of the adulations which others receive.

Most dictators are egomaniacs; they do not for the most part feel appreciated by the populace; in fact, they feel as though they have been rejected by their own people; consequently, feeling as though they have very few confidants and loyal subjects, they become envious of the adulations which any notable figure may receive. Caligula had many men tortured and even killed because they were admired for their physical attractiveness. A son of a revered centurion, Aesius Proculus, nicknamed Giant Cupid because of his robustly good looks, was violently thrust into the amphitheater to compete against gladiators, led through the streets in rags amidst jeering crowds, and executed all because Caligula was envious of his popularity. Being envious and suspicious, the dictator naturally suppresses demonstrations which he feels rival his power or popularity. Once he suspects members of his inner circle becoming too powerful or too popular, he begins to accuse them of treason and has them humiliated, imprisoned, and, in some cases, executed. He lives for the most part in a constant state of paranoia. His government is very oppressive.

Dictators who rule for many, many years and appear to be very popular are ones who have successfully projected their fears onto factions which represent a threat to the dominant culture or foreign enemies. By use of propaganda, the citizens of their countries are indoctrinated into believing they have not been victimized by their governments, but by either minorities or special interest groups which have been classified as enemies of the State or foreign powers.

It's as though the the popular-dictator-to-subject relationship is indicative of Stockholm syndrome. By characterizing himself as a champion of national values or the values of the dominant culture, the people identify with him as a fellow sufferer; and, even though he is, truly, their oppressor, they defend him against those who wish to deliver them from his oppressive regime.

The only distinction between an unpopular dictator and a popular one is one focuses his anger for his sense of victimization on the dominant culture of his own country and the other focuses his anger away from the dominant culture onto a scapegoat.
FungusOfHam
Posts: 2,360
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5/30/2018 4:26:34 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 5/30/2018 3:02:20 AM, s-anthony wrote:
Just because a beneficiary appreciates a benefactor for his good deeds does not necessarily mean the benefactor feels appreciated. The mistake, I believe, so often made, is assuming showing appreciation translates into feeling appreciated. Often, people who are egomaniacs tend to overestimate their benefit to others. Consequently, even though beneficiaries may show appropriate appreciation, because they've overestimated themselves as benefactors, they underestimate the appreciation of their beneficiaries.

Feeling unappreciated, they become jaded not only to the point of discontinuing their contributions, but, also, to the point of retribution.

They feel as though they have been rejected by society and become envious of the adulations which others receive.

Most dictators are egomaniacs; they do not for the most part feel appreciated by the populace; in fact, they feel as though they have been rejected by their own people; consequently, feeling as though they have very few confidants and loyal subjects, they become envious of the adulations which any notable figure may receive. Caligula had many men tortured and even killed because they were admired for their physical attractiveness. A son of a revered centurion, Aesius Proculus, nicknamed Giant Cupid because of his robustly good looks, was violently thrust into the amphitheater to compete against gladiators, led through the streets in rags amidst jeering crowds, and executed all because Caligula was envious of his popularity. Being envious and suspicious, the dictator naturally suppresses demonstrations which he feels rival his power or popularity. Once he suspects members of his inner circle becoming too powerful or too popular, he begins to accuse them of treason and has them humiliated, imprisoned, and, in some cases, executed. He lives for the most part in a constant state of paranoia. His government is very oppressive.

Dictators who rule for many, many years and appear to be very popular are ones who have successfully projected their fears onto factions which represent a threat to the dominant culture or foreign enemies. By use of propaganda, the citizens of their countries are indoctrinated into believing they have not been victimized by their governments, but by either minorities or special interest groups which have been classified as enemies of the State or foreign powers.

It's as though the the popular-dictator-to-subject relationship is indicative of Stockholm syndrome. By characterizing himself as a champion of national values or the values of the dominant culture, the people identify with him as a fellow sufferer; and, even though he is, truly, their oppressor, they defend him against those who wish to deliver them from his oppressive regime.

The only distinction between an unpopular dictator and a popular one is one focuses his anger for his sense of victimization on the dominant culture of his own country and the other focuses his anger away from the dominant culture onto a scapegoat.::

Yes. We are familiar with the liberal majority saying Obama was a victim on a daily basis and trying to shut down free dpeech on campus with violence and intimidation...
s-anthony
Posts: 3,462
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5/30/2018 4:52:41 PM
Posted: 9 months ago
At 5/30/2018 4:26:34 AM, FungusOfHam wrote:
At 5/30/2018 3:02:20 AM, s-anthony wrote:
Just because a beneficiary appreciates a benefactor for his good deeds does not necessarily mean the benefactor feels appreciated. The mistake, I believe, so often made, is assuming showing appreciation translates into feeling appreciated. Often, people who are egomaniacs tend to overestimate their benefit to others. Consequently, even though beneficiaries may show appropriate appreciation, because they've overestimated themselves as benefactors, they underestimate the appreciation of their beneficiaries.

Feeling unappreciated, they become jaded not only to the point of discontinuing their contributions, but, also, to the point of retribution.

They feel as though they have been rejected by society and become envious of the adulations which others receive.

Most dictators are egomaniacs; they do not for the most part feel appreciated by the populace; in fact, they feel as though they have been rejected by their own people; consequently, feeling as though they have very few confidants and loyal subjects, they become envious of the adulations which any notable figure may receive. Caligula had many men tortured and even killed because they were admired for their physical attractiveness. A son of a revered centurion, Aesius Proculus, nicknamed Giant Cupid because of his robustly good looks, was violently thrust into the amphitheater to compete against gladiators, led through the streets in rags amidst jeering crowds, and executed all because Caligula was envious of his popularity. Being envious and suspicious, the dictator naturally suppresses demonstrations which he feels rival his power or popularity. Once he suspects members of his inner circle becoming too powerful or too popular, he begins to accuse them of treason and has them humiliated, imprisoned, and, in some cases, executed. He lives for the most part in a constant state of paranoia. His government is very oppressive.

Dictators who rule for many, many years and appear to be very popular are ones who have successfully projected their fears onto factions which represent a threat to the dominant culture or foreign enemies. By use of propaganda, the citizens of their countries are indoctrinated into believing they have not been victimized by their governments, but by either minorities or special interest groups which have been classified as enemies of the State or foreign powers.

It's as though the the popular-dictator-to-subject relationship is indicative of Stockholm syndrome. By characterizing himself as a champion of national values or the values of the dominant culture, the people identify with him as a fellow sufferer; and, even though he is, truly, their oppressor, they defend him against those who wish to deliver them from his oppressive regime.

The only distinction between an unpopular dictator and a popular one is one focuses his anger for his sense of victimization on the dominant culture of his own country and the other focuses his anger away from the dominant culture onto a scapegoat.::

Yes. We are familiar with the liberal majority saying Obama was a victim on a daily basis and trying to shut down free dpeech on campus with violence and intimidation...

A president who is popular among certain political factions is one with whom they identify, and, identifying with him, they sympathize with him; his supporters take his victimization personally and, consequently, respond viscerally.