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When The Time Comes

Willows
Posts: 11,597
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10/12/2018 12:48:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, It is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, There can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, Why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, Being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will?

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?

Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?
Tradesecret
Posts: 1,426
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10/13/2018 1:42:47 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, It is a matter of conscience.

Why is it a matter of conscience? Would you take the view that murder is a matter of conscience? I think murder is ALWAYS wrong. I do think there is a difference between killing and murder.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, There can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

I don't find arguments based upon personal experience persuasive. When people are put into prison, They suffer and their families suffer. Suffering is not a persuasive argument for the court not to put someone into prison. Similarly, I know of people who use illicit substances to ease their pain. This however is not considered justifiable to break the law.

Yet, Why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, Being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will?

You seem to lack broad enough knowledge of theist's position in relation to euthanasia. There is much diversity and there is not one strict position. For most the question of whether euthanasia is murder is significant. Others do take the view that suffering ought to be unnecessary or mitigated as best as possible. Others discuss whether there is any point in keeping someone alive on a machine when without the machine they would die naturally. Others see it as a humane way of ending someone's pain and suffering.

I have lost lots of friends over the years to suicide. I talk to Christian doctors who provide certain medication to their patients which essentially take away the will of the patient to keep fighting.

I think it is a terribly complex issue. I don't agree with murder and I don't agree with suicide for the sake of escaping the pain. For me, Non-Christians who take their own life really only speed up the inevitability of where they are going. But I don't want them to suffer even more and I would prefer it if they considered the cost of not trusting Jesus. On the other hand, I don't think euthanasia is the unforgiveable sin. Although if one dies without trusting Jesus then it seals the deal. On the hand if a believer takes his or her own life, This will speed them to heaven. But that is something they will have to deal with when they get there.

I think that the purpose of life is to glorify God and to enjoy him forever. I think God gives life and he takes it away. Many Christians who have experienced great suffering in this world by losing limbs or other things we take for granted or suffered great loss have used these losses to great glory for God. It is ironic I think that non-believers who suffer many of the same things - blame God for their loss even though they are atheists. I think that must be the ultimate pain and suffering. They have suffered so much - they just want to escape and yet, In their grief, They struggle to come to terms with the reality of life. It certainly strikes me - that this grief and suffering is real. Life is real. Yet those who deny the reality of God suffer more than everyone who sees the reality of God.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?


On the contrary, It reveals that they love and honour and respect God. And secondly, It also reveals that they don't want any to suffer more than they have too.

Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?


You know, Sometimes I think it would be good if God was a myth and the bible a book of lies just so that I did not have to endure the constant madness and hatred from non-believers. Yet, As soon as I open my eyes, I am confronted by the reality of God. Christians are not washing their hands - they are very much at the forefront of dealing with these issues. It is Christians who take the deeper look and not just see the pain and suffering as something to blame God for.
Harikrish
Posts: 28,394
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10/13/2018 2:22:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Willows wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, It is a matter of conscience.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, There can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

Yet, Why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, Being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will?

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?

Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?

Christians believe in judgement day, Lake of fire called hell, Armageddon and worse for the non believers. Don't add euthanasia to their tool box or those terrible days will be shortened for even more.
Willows
Posts: 11,597
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10/13/2018 11:26:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Tradesecret wrote:
This has always been an emotional topic and there really is not an answer that is right or wrong, It is a matter of conscience.

Why is it a matter of conscience? Would you take the view that murder is a matter of conscience? I think murder is ALWAYS wrong. I do think there is a difference between killing and murder.

There can be arguments coming from people who have had personal experiences of loved ones going through the agony of dying supporting voluntary euthanasia. Similarly, There can be arguments from those who are concerned with undue pressure from relatives influencing a patient to make a decision.

I don't find arguments based upon personal experience persuasive. When people are put into prison, They suffer and their families suffer. Suffering is not a persuasive argument for the court not to put someone into prison. Similarly, I know of people who use illicit substances to ease their pain. This however is not considered justifiable to break the law.

Yet, Why is it that theists seem to have only one answer, Being against voluntary euthanasia and for no other reason than they perceive it to be against God's will?

You seem to lack broad enough knowledge of theist's position in relation to euthanasia. There is much diversity and there is not one strict position. For most the question of whether euthanasia is murder is significant. Others do take the view that suffering ought to be unnecessary or mitigated as best as possible. Others discuss whether there is any point in keeping someone alive on a machine when without the machine they would die naturally. Others see it as a humane way of ending someone's pain and suffering.


I have lost lots of friends over the years to suicide. I talk to Christian doctors who provide certain medication to their patients which essentially take away the will of the patient to keep fighting.


I think it is a terribly complex issue. I don't agree with murder and I don't agree with suicide for the sake of escaping the pain. For me, Non-Christians who take their own life really only speed up the inevitability of where they are going. But I don't want them to suffer even more and I would prefer it if they considered the cost of not trusting Jesus. On the other hand, I don't think euthanasia is the unforgiveable sin. Although if one dies without trusting Jesus then it seals the deal. On the hand if a believer takes his or her own life, This will speed them to heaven. But that is something they will have to deal with when they get there.

I think that the purpose of life is to glorify God and to enjoy him forever. I think God gives life and he takes it away. Many Christians who have experienced great suffering in this world by losing limbs or other things we take for granted or suffered great loss have used these losses to great glory for God. It is ironic I think that non-believers who suffer many of the same things - blame God for their loss even though they are atheists. I think that must be the ultimate pain and suffering. They have suffered so much - they just want to escape and yet, In their grief, They struggle to come to terms with the reality of life. It certainly strikes me - that this grief and suffering is real. Life is real. Yet those who deny the reality of God suffer more than everyone who sees the reality of God.

Does this show a cold-blooded lack of any compassion on the part of theists?


On the contrary, It reveals that they love and honour and respect God. And secondly, It also reveals that they don't want any to suffer more than they have too.

Are they washing their hands to the whole matter by leaning on the old excuses of "we believe" and "it is written"?



You know, Sometimes I think it would be good if God was a myth and the bible a book of lies just so that I did not have to endure the constant madness and hatred from non-believers. Yet, As soon as I open my eyes, I am confronted by the reality of God. Christians are not washing their hands - they are very much at the forefront of dealing with these issues. It is Christians who take the deeper look and not just see the pain and suffering as something to blame God for.

Christians may be at the forefront of the issue and whilst I would never condone suicide I fully support assisted euthanasia in the case of terminal illness. I have found that the Christian view, Even in these cases is that God will make the decision.
Surely, Wouldn't Christians be able to exercise their right of free will to end a life from a condition that has been found to be terminal?
MasonicSlayer
Posts: 3,649
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10/15/2018 3:58:31 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Where did everyone go? This place seems empty. Did they all get sucked up in a blue light or did I get lost in another realm?

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