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Norse Beliefs more realistic than the Bible

CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

According to Norse Mythology, the universe was created by the convergence of the elemental fires of Muspelheim and the elemental ice of Niflheim. The ice and fire converged and created the universe. Similarly, there is a famous theory backed by science, known as the Big Bang, which states that the universe was created from some sort of combustion, or high-energy reaction. The convergence of the fire and ice, in that respect, is similar to the Big Bang. The Bible simply states that a God created the world and such by saying "let there be light," and such.

Additionally, Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible in the respect that the Norse Gods are more human-like. They're not perfect. Many have human emotions and characteristics such as greed, spite, envy, anger, confusion, and happiness. They are capable of making mistakes. God, on the other hand, according to the Bible, is apparently an "all-knowing" and "all-powerful" being. If God could, however, know everything, then why is he allowing lurid things such as terrorism and genocide? Is he incapable of resolving these issues or does he simply not want to?

Anyone have any responses to this?
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 4:43:00 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.

Alright. I just intend to make this a discussion on which set of religious beliefs is more realistic.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 4:50:55 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:43:00 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.

Alright. I just intend to make this a discussion on which set of religious beliefs is more realistic.

Why?
Ludofl3x
Posts: 2,283
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3/6/2017 4:52:04 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
They both enjoy the same amount of verisimilitude! It's like arguing which comic book character is more real, Superman or Spider Man.
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 4:52:26 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:50:55 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:43:00 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.

Alright. I just intend to make this a discussion on which set of religious beliefs is more realistic.

Why?

Personal interest. I'm reading a wee bit of Norse Mythology at the moment.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 5:11:54 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 4:52:26 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:50:55 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:43:00 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.

Alright. I just intend to make this a discussion on which set of religious beliefs is more realistic.

Why?

Personal interest. I'm reading a wee bit of Norse Mythology at the moment.

If you're interested in mythology, I would strongly suggest reading something of Joseph Campbell's writing. He is the 'Einstein of mythology', and has written in depth and extensibly on the subject. There is also a video series available that was immensely popular when it aired 20 years ago, as it was truly a fascinating exploration of mythology from all around the world and throughout human history.

Campbell was wonderful at explaining the fundamental motives and ideals expressed through mythology, and he is essential to anyone interested in the subject from a modern perspective.

If you're just reading them for entertainment, that's OK, but keep in mind that isn't why those stories were created.
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 5:15:49 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Try reading Joseph Campbell's, "Hero With A Thousand Faces". It will help you understand the mythical 'hero' archetype with a whole new insight.
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 5:28:43 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 5:11:54 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:52:26 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:50:55 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:43:00 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:41:46 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:34:02 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:29:52 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 4:08:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:
I believe that Norse Mythology is more realistic than the Bible.

Perhaps, but Shakespeare's stories are more 'realistic' that either of them, and yet it remains fiction.

'Realism' is not reality. 'Realism' is a tool of artifice.

I'm simply comparing Biblical beliefs to Norse Mythology. I don't take Norse Mythology as fact.

And I'm simply pointing out that the degree of realism is not what makes mythology relevant, or important.

Alright. I just intend to make this a discussion on which set of religious beliefs is more realistic.

Why?

Personal interest. I'm reading a wee bit of Norse Mythology at the moment.

If you're interested in mythology, I would strongly suggest reading something of Joseph Campbell's writing. He is the 'Einstein of mythology', and has written in depth and extensibly on the subject. There is also a video series available that was immensely popular when it aired 20 years ago, as it was truly a fascinating exploration of mythology from all around the world and throughout human history.

Campbell was wonderful at explaining the fundamental motives and ideals expressed through mythology, and he is essential to anyone interested in the subject from a modern perspective.

If you're just reading them for entertainment, that's OK, but keep in mind that isn't why those stories were created.

I appreciate the recommendation. Also, yes, I understand that Norse Mythology was not made to be a source of entertainment. However, media, movies, and Marvel Comics seem to make it seem that way.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 5:52:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 5:28:43 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:

I appreciate the recommendation. Also, yes, I understand that Norse Mythology was not made to be a source of entertainment. However, media, movies, and Marvel Comics seem to make it seem that way.

Where there's money to be made "

I'm not generally an enthusiast of mythology, myself. I appreciate biblical mythology because it's so subtle and complex. Amazing, really, for a bunch of ancient herdsmen. Though it is an amalgamation of various tribes, cultures, and preceding civilizations. So I suppose that would account for the sophistication of those myths and symbols.

What I know of Norse mythology implies to me that they were better story-tellers. But I think their myths had a slightly different purpose than biblical mythology. Though it would be difficult to articulate that difference, I confess.

Perhaps you should try comparing it to, say, native American myths, just to get a sense for how different cultures used mythology similarly, and yet differently. Just something to consider.
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 5:57:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 5:52:09 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 5:28:43 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:

I appreciate the recommendation. Also, yes, I understand that Norse Mythology was not made to be a source of entertainment. However, media, movies, and Marvel Comics seem to make it seem that way.

Where there's money to be made "

I'm not generally an enthusiast of mythology, myself. I appreciate biblical mythology because it's so subtle and complex. Amazing, really, for a bunch of ancient herdsmen. Though it is an amalgamation of various tribes, cultures, and preceding civilizations. So I suppose that would account for the sophistication of those myths and symbols.

What I know of Norse mythology implies to me that they were better story-tellers. But I think their myths had a slightly different purpose than biblical mythology. Though it would be difficult to articulate that difference, I confess.

Perhaps you should try comparing it to, say, native American myths, just to get a sense for how different cultures used mythology similarly, and yet differently. Just something to consider.

Yes, Norse Mythology is fairly interesting. These stories are very abstract, entertaining and telling of the cultures of the Germanic people and Vikings who wrote this.

Maybe I'll take suggestion to pursue native American myths and such. I have been hankering to learn more about different cultures and religions.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
CosmoJarvis
Posts: 1,078
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3/6/2017 5:57:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 5:52:09 PM, PureX wrote:
At 3/6/2017 5:28:43 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:

I appreciate the recommendation. Also, yes, I understand that Norse Mythology was not made to be a source of entertainment. However, media, movies, and Marvel Comics seem to make it seem that way.

Where there's money to be made "

I'm not generally an enthusiast of mythology, myself. I appreciate biblical mythology because it's so subtle and complex. Amazing, really, for a bunch of ancient herdsmen. Though it is an amalgamation of various tribes, cultures, and preceding civilizations. So I suppose that would account for the sophistication of those myths and symbols.

What I know of Norse mythology implies to me that they were better story-tellers. But I think their myths had a slightly different purpose than biblical mythology. Though it would be difficult to articulate that difference, I confess.

Perhaps you should try comparing it to, say, native American myths, just to get a sense for how different cultures used mythology similarly, and yet differently. Just something to consider.

Yes, Norse Mythology is fairly interesting. These stories are very abstract, entertaining and telling of the cultures of the Germanic people and Vikings who wrote this.

Maybe I'll take suggestion to pursue native American myths and such. I have been hankering to learn more about different cultures and religions.
"fake and gay" -Vaarka
"Submit to the soy or be annihilated." -Thett3
PureX
Posts: 4,075
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3/6/2017 6:27:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2017 5:57:09 PM, CosmoJarvis wrote:

Maybe I'll take suggestion to pursue native American myths and such. I have been hankering to learn more about different cultures and religions.

I'm not very familiar with Native American myths, though I remember a few of their stories from years ago. What I remember most was an amazingly practical sensibility, coupled with a complete lack of probable factuality. Very interesting, that.

This is not a mythical story, it's an actual anecdote from the author Robert Pursig (author of "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance"). It illuminates the very interesting mind-set of Native American culture.

Robert and his wife were visiting a friend on a reservation in New Mexico. Their friend was a Navajo chief/elder. They were walking along a dirt track on the res, just chatting as they walked, when a dog happened to run across the road up in front of them. Robert's wife asked the chief what kind of dog that was, just out of idle curiosity, but the chief stopped walking and thought for a long time. Finally he said, "That's a GOOD dog".

It did not generally occur to Native Americans to manipulate nature to suit their purposes, like the selective breeding of dogs or horses. Instead, they saw these animals as having their own unique spirits, some of which were helpful to them, and some not. The chief wasn't making a joke. To him, this was the honest answer to Mrs. Pursig's question. That particular god had a good spirit, and that's what defined the dog to the chief.

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