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Russian Literature

japakhova
Posts: 1
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1/8/2014 4:49:10 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I am a Russian-speaking person, English isn't my mother tongue, but of course we study European writers as well, some of them are either for compulsory reading or highly recommended in our school curriculum, e.g. Oscar Wilde, Shakespeare, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Stivenson and others. So, I am just curious if any of Russian, Soviet writers, poets are studied at your schools, or maybe you read them due to personal enthusiasm, interest. And if you do, then whom do you like most? and do you read them in the original or in translated/adapted versions?
Angelos
Posts: 30
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1/10/2014 3:46:50 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/8/2014 4:49:10 AM, japakhova wrote:
I am a Russian-speaking person, English isn't my mother tongue, but of course we study European writers as well, some of them are either for compulsory reading or highly recommended in our school curriculum, e.g. Oscar Wilde, Shakespeare, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain, Stivenson and others. So, I am just curious if any of Russian, Soviet writers, poets are studied at your schools, or maybe you read them due to personal enthusiasm, interest. And if you do, then whom do you like most? and do you read them in the original or in translated/adapted versions?

I read a lot of stories written by Anton Chekhov, one of Russia's many great writers, just for personal enthusiasm and interests. His stories are very short and they're good for teaching beginners how to write short stories, too.
Leaning
Posts: 2,449
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1/31/2018 8:03:54 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Fyodor Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment is one of my favorite books. I enjoy how it is written, the themes that it deals with, the characters. A book I love to reread.

The Brothers Karamazov was interesting, I only read that one once due to it's enormity and not gripping me at the time (Feel like rereading it right now though). I recall feeling... unsatisfied with how it all ended. It felt as though very important concepts and thoughts of the characters had not reached their conclusions.
Perhaps a pity he never wrote the sequel.

Nadezhda Durova
Cavalry Maiden: Journals of a female Russian officer in the Napoleonic wars
Somewhat interesting.

Are the only two authors that I can recall reading at some point in my life.

Read a book about Roman von Ungern-Sternberg The Bloody White Baron that I found interesting, but don't believe a Russian wrote it.

Own a copy of Leon Trotsky My Life, but have yet to read it.
Leaning
Posts: 2,449
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1/25/2019 3:01:12 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
Heard of them, Haven't read them yet. What pieces, Themes, Characters, Styles, Or other caused this love?

Sidenote, Reading The Bully Pulpit about Roosevelt and Taft right now. In part of the biography it mentions a reaction Roosevelt had to some of Tolstoy writing

He had carried Anna Karenina with him during this trip west and told Corinne that he "read it through with very great interest. " Although he considered Tolstoy "a great writer, " he found his work deeply unsettling. "Do you notice how he never comments on the actions of his personages? He relates what they thought or did without any remark whatever as to whether it was good or bad, As Thucydides wrote history- a fact which tends to give his work an unmoral rather than an immoral tone, Together with the sadness so characteristic of Russian writers. "

An interesting view I thought, Though it seemed odd in a fashion to me. I'd think there were books often enough where situations existed for the reader to project their own view upon stories and characters without having to be lead to conclusions. Though I suppose authors might still be leading more subtly with their works, Even without narrating it clear cut.
PerezA
Posts: 21
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1/25/2019 7:11:20 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
for example Kashtanka by Anton Chekhov.
Tolstoy "War and Peace" the best but very long book.
Leaning
Posts: 2,449
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1/26/2019 5:29:35 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
War and Peace is one of those books on my someday reading list. Sounds good, Interesting. But it also sounds horribly long, Complex, And interesting in a way that might not be my interests.

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