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  • Too much information

    Yes I believe if you’re overly suggestive type of person or hypersensitive in life it can have dangerous side effects “as in you can’t handle the truth “ also a lot of reading on analysis and psychology and it’s different conditions doesn’t help in over analyzing things makes for a hypochondriac

  • Too much information

    Yes I believe if you’re overly suggestive type of person or hypersensitive in life it can have dangerous side effects “as in you can’t handle the truth “ also a lot of reading on analysis and psychology and it’s different conditions doesn’t help in over analyzing things makes for a hypochondriac

  • Yip, I think it can.

    The universe, society, culture etc. is far too complex for our little minds to fully comprehend. The more you learn, the more you [should] become aware of how little you actually know. You cant run new software on an old PC... It will crash. The same is true of our minds - they can only compute so much before the information overload makes us crazy.

  • Yes it can.

    It took away my "specialness" my identity. It's a good thing I think, or I thought. But now, every worldly pursuit I try to do, in order to support my body, I mean eat just sort of maintain - I now realize is some type of cannibalism. I feel bad even writing those words because I know it's like a virus. It stops me from doing anything, I don't want to participate at all. I'm a vegan, but I'm starting to feel guilt eating a tomato. Don't get me started on finance friends. I've gone mad, and this isn't even the bad part, now I just try to block it out, but when I was first learning I was starkly insane, with painful full body symptoms. Once you realize what this place is, it's never the same, but I wouldn't choose to unknow it because I hold out hope that through this knowing I will find my way out. Good luck

  • Yes it can.

    It took away my "specialness" my identity. It's a good thing I think, or I thought. But now, every worldly pursuit I try to do, in order to support my body, I mean eat just sort of maintain - I now realize is some type of cannibalism. I feel bad even writing those words because I know it's like a virus. It stops me from doing anything, I don't want to participate at all. I'm a vegan, but I'm starting to feel guilt eating a tomato. Don't get me started on finance friends. I've gone mad, and this isn't even the bad part, now I just try to block it out, but when I was first learning I was starkly insane, with painful full body symptoms. Once you realize what this place is, it's never the same, but I wouldn't choose to unknow it because I hold out hope that through this knowing I will find my way out. Good luck

  • If everything is correct then everything is wrong.

    According to philosophy everything i tell you right now is complete bull shit, so why are you still reading? Is it conditioning? Is it your "moral conscience" or is it because your religion tells you to at least listen to every ones opinions? Well at this point it does not matter why you are still reading, the point is you got this far and its far enough for me to give you my reasoning. The study of philosophy is a contradiction itself, you can not study it because it means you are technically studding something wrong, that is what philosophy teaches. So the only way to live life in a sense of awareness and still be happy is by consciously accepting societies truths that you can not change. But at the same time being able to see the opposite side of that. In turn you are left with more questions than answers and if you do come up with an answer it is only as correct as it is wrong. As happy as you can be in the perception you are the opposite in theory. I can perspectably be happy following religion and taking its purpose but philosophy teaches me to do otherwize and at the end of the day all the questions you ask you realize (blank)

    as you see any statement i make can be looked at the opposite way. So if you have no answer then you realize there is nothing. Not because there is nothing just because you can not achieve the knowledge. It is all a paradox

  • Too much overthinking can lead to psychological problems.

    I personally do have OCD because of my overthinking (I do not blame the philosophy itself, it is probably just my mind focused always on overthinking almost every little problem, and philosophy is a subjects based on problems, even to solve them if it is possible, and find a possibility). But I have also heard about other individual philosophy lovers who suffers from schizophrenia, anxiety, several types of phobias.

  • Too much overthinking can lead to psychological problems.

    I personally do have OCD because of my overthinking (I do not blame the philosophy itself, it is probably just my mind focused always on overthinking almost every little problem, and philosophy is a subjects based on problems, even to solve them if it is possible, and find a possibility). But I have also heard about other individual philosophy lovers who suffers from schizophrenia, anxiety, several types of phobias.

  • Too much overthinking can lead to psychological problems.

    I personally do have OCD because of my overthinking (I do not blame the philosophy itself, it is probably just my mind focused always on overthinking almost every little problem, and philosophy is a subjects based on problems, even to solve them if it is possible, and find a possibility). But I have also heard about other individual philosophy lovers who suffers from schizophrenia, anxiety, several types of phobias.

  • Too much thinking can lead to several psychological problems.

    Well, I am not sure how can it effect our minds, but I think every intellectual person (even not) has experienced at least once in a lifetime things such as depersonalization, derealization, existential anxiety, or had anxiety problems. I was always interested in big questions. I made a quite big perspective through the years, and now I have OCD (maybe I can't blame philosophy itself, but my overthinking could help for its creation). I have also heard about philosophy lovers suffer from different kinds of phobias, schizophrenia, anxiety...

  • What is Crazy?

    Before the question can be interpreted logically, it should be given a falsifiable hypothesis and underlying concepts should be evaluated. The hypothesis is the statement "Philosophy does make you crazy." The first two underlying claims address the clarification of language. The third underlying question may shed light on the deception of the question itself.

    First, philosophy is defined as:
    Dictionary.Com says Philosophy is "the rational investigation of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct."

    Second, crazy is defined as:
    Dictionary.Com gives us two definitions: "(1) mentally deranged; demented; insane." Or, "(2) senseless; impractical; totally unsound."

    With this clarification of language, the statement "Philosophy does make you crazy" appears to be a logical contradiction. When the statement is reworded with provided definitions: "rational investigation does give rise to senselessness, insanity, and dementia." This statement is just as contradictory as the statement "four sides do give rise to triangles."

    To uncover the third underlying claim, it would be necessary to inquire upon the origin of crazy:
    From a psychological standpoint, it could be true that an excess of stress does give rise to crazy. Furthermore, it could be true for some that critical thinking does give rise to an excess of stress. Finally, it could be true that Philosophy does give rise to relatively greater levels of critical thinking. Yet the debate is surrounded on the idea that philosophy - literally, the love of knowledge - causes crazy directly.

    In conclusion, when conducting rational investigation of truth on the statement "Philosophy does make you crazy," certain concepts become clear. The concept of logical contradiction in the claim itself, and the concept of confusing correlation for causation. It very well could be true that there is a positive correlation between philosophy and craziness; however, it cannot be stressed enough, correlation is not to be confused with causation.

    Tbh, if Philosophy is making you crazy, you're doing it wrong.

  • Compared with what?

    Alternatives to philosophy:

    1) To ignore it and follow your nose. That means spending a lot of time being confused, threatened and frustrated by things that more knowledge and understanding would have explained.

    2) Avoid having to think by adopting a doctrine. Since all religions are different, then either all bar one are wrong, or they are all wrong.

    If you represent all religious beliefs on a Venn diagram, the tiny area where all of the religions intersect would give you purely philosophical concepts. "Do unto others ..." etc.

    My impression from philosophy forums is that many (but not all) contributors are so caught up in their ideas of what should be that they display less understanding of human diversity than even children I've met. People can believe they have solved the problems of the universe while being embarrassingly naive about their own backyard.

    Often there's the "geek problem" where smart kids are rejected for being different. So they focus on study and hobbies, living in their own little mental world,

    People lacking in social skills can appear crazy to the socially adroit, but it's not the same.

  • No, philosophy has the opposite effect!

    The basis of philosophy is to help make sense of the world so that we become more aware of how it all ticks. There are of course some "pseudo-philosophies" that are nutty in and of themselves that can make people crazy (like paranoid theories of the Illuminati being behind everything). But when we're talking about Philosophy with a capital "P" as shaped by such great European and Eastern philosophers as Socrates, Buddha, Aristotle, Kant, etc, then no-- philosophy won't make you crazy. If anything, it'll make you saner than everybody else!

  • Philosophy itself cannot make you crazy

    Philosophy, As defined in Greek, Is the love of wisdom. Philosophy encompasses literally everything from epistemology - the study of knowledge, Logic, Ethics, Free-will, Etc. It also forces us to confront our limitations of knowledge. This is where, In my opinion, People think it can make you crazy. This isn't philosophy making you crazy though. It's your understanding (or lack of) and ability to process the information confronting you. If you find it depressing that we live on a pale blue dot in a seemly infinite universe with no intrinsic value attached to our lives with no clear pathway to what it means to live a good life then I suppose this can make you crazy. What you should arguably do instead is focus on minimizing the suffering of yourself and others and try to prescribe your own purpose to life. Obviously this can be disputed philosophically but that's kind of the beauty in it. Don't let philosophy bring you down. Instead implement it as a useful tool to hone in your thoughts on reality and try and live best you can, In-line with whatever you think that is.

  • It only makes you think.

    Philosophy only gets your mind going. And "thinking" might make you feel uncomfortable, but you just need to become comfortable in the discomfort. Or at least get used to it. Philosophy doesn't drive you crazy, it expands your mind and drives your thoughts beyond your imagination. Whatever you want to call that is up to you

  • PHILOSOPHY will not make us crazy.It gives us a chance to be free.

    Philosophy makes sense.Why?Because it's about our life.It's not contrasted to RELIGION,instead,it will teach us to be a good man doing the right thing which every religion wants.It doesn't mean that when we decided to start a career in philosophy we will also believe in other philosophers beliefs or theories.Everything always depends on us,the thing is.. We study philosophy to stand for our own belief.Crazy is not the right term,free is.


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