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Do you support President Trump's border wall along our border with Mexico?

  • Build the wall

    There are some misconceptions that’s I want to clear up
    1:This is new:Do there already is a wall just in carrying areas by major cities etc.Trump wants to link all of these walls to togeather.
    2:a wall is unless:While the argument if they will use drones and tunnels to avoid the wall is a valid argument it is sort of wrong.Obvious domes can’t be used to traffick people and tunnels are for more of drug trafficking.So a wall would stop humans as the vast majority of illegals cross in the wilderness.Also if you don’t believe me Israel has built walls that stop people and when San Diego built a wall it stopped people by 90%.So obvious a wall is not foolproof but doesn’t have to be it just needs to be a man fable trickle that boarder guards can deal with.

  • F soros's bots

    I think most Americans understand the basic fact that only citizens are entitled to the rights and benefits of said country. America is one of the only countries to ever exist with as porous borders as we have. When Trump won, many americans sought to move to Canada only to find out that they had harsh immigration standards. Likewise, we couldn't just move to Britain and assume citizenship there. Also, I hate these dumb bots

  • Build the wall.

    It would cost 70 billion to build which would then save us approximately 300-900 billion dollars. Mexico and the United States have no real ties, though we claim an alliance they provide nothing for is. It is not racist to close borders to people who would do the country harm. In fact claiming that we should allow them in simply because of their skin color is racism. If someone wants in they can come LEGALLY.

  • They are the native people

    How could you steal land from the natives and then try to build a border it doesn’t make any sense.
    Building a wall is reaching already you’ve crossed one of the highest level of racism . They were already been oppressed by your white/British ancestors who believed that they can discover land who people already lived in!?? It’s like saying I discovered your car in the parking lot and won’t call it stealing ?!??
    Plus it will destroy your economy because when Mexican move from Mexico to the u.S.A you are gaining hard working people, who are trying so hard to fit in in the society and gain few dollars and money that your ancestors have stolen. You guy did that to South Africa, but not by building a wall but by creating a racist system that separates people and those people who are opressed are the originals and the native .

  • Obviously a bad idea.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. However, none of these myths are based in fact.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall. These are far from the only problems with the border wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Not to mention, in certain areas, building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad - a name that means ‘friendship’ in Spanish. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, including endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Obviously a bad idea.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. However, none of these myths are based in fact.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall. These are far from the only problems with the border wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Not to mention, in certain areas, building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad - a name that means ‘friendship’ in Spanish. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, including endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Obviously not a good idea.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. However, none of these myths are based in fact.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall. These are far from the only problems with the border wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Not to mention, in certain areas, building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad - a name that means ‘friendship’ in Spanish. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, including endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Obviously not a good idea.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. However, none of these myths are based in fact.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall. These are far from the only problems with the border wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Not to mention, in certain areas, building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad - a name that means ‘friendship’ in Spanish. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, including endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Obviously not a good idea.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. However, none of these myths are based in fact.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall. These are far from the only problems with the border wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Not to mention, in certain areas, building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad - a name that means ‘friendship’ in Spanish. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, including endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Obviously not - much against this.

    Many Americans hold misconceptions about many aspects of immigration. Some believe a border wall with Mexico is truly the best way to stop illegal immigration. Others believe that immigrants steal jobs from Americans, and limiting immigration of all kinds - legal and illegal - would help the economy. Many people also believe that illegal immigrants don’t pay taxes and rely on welfare to get by.

    The concept of a border wall doesn’t take into consideration the fact that anywhere from a third to a half of illegal immigrants are a result of overstayed visas, not travel by foot over the border, which is the only type of illegal immigration a wall would stop. It ignores the fact that a system of fences, see-through barriers, and technology such as drones and infrared cameras are far more effective in stopping travel over the border than a simple wall.

    The border wall isn’t a cheap or fast endeavor. According to a report by the Department of Homeland Security, it could take $21.6 billion and three and a half years to build. Building a wall would be impractical and difficult. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border crosses miles of arid desert, where there are practically no border crossings. An area along the Texas border includes cliffs that drop hundreds of feet, miles of desert, and no people in sight. The border also crosses directly over Lake Amistad. It also passes through the Rio Grande. El Paso, Texas, U.S.A. and Juárez, Mexico, are separate cities only because of the border between the two countries, and many children cross the border to go to school. If a border wall was built there, it would disrupt the cities and the lives of almost everyone living there.

    Building the border wall would be a legal nightmare as well. A boundary treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, signed in 1970 states that structures built along the Rio Grande and Colorado River at the border cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers. Obligations from treaties and dangers from the flood zones of rivers would require the wall to be built miles inland from the actual border. The border also runs along private properties and tribal land belonging to at least one Native American tribe: the Tohono O’odham. To build a wall here, the government would have to buy property from these groups - some of whom may not want to sell it.

    The border wall also would have environmental impacts. If built across natural drainages, the flood risk for those areas would dramatically increase. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, a wall between two cities in Mexico and Arizona acted as a dam during heavy rains, causing floods each time. Additionally, the wall would fragment the habitat of many species, cluding endangered ones (the jaguar, Sonoran pronghorn, and ocelot), adversely affecting them. These animals have become endangered because of habitat loss, and building a wall through the little space they have left could ultimately lead to their extinction.

  • Open Borders with Mexico!

    Mexico is one of our closest allies. It is a terrible idea for so many reasons. It would damage our diplomatic relations with Mexico, and it would cost $70 billion to build. Plus, it is a racist move, especially on President Trump's behalf. We do not need trouble with any more countries right now.


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