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  • Yes, at will employment is fair

    At will employ is fair as it works for both sides. For employers they are able to fire a worker as they see fit and for employees they are allowed to quit as they see fit. At will employment allows neither to be locked in at the job so employers can't hold on to somebody who wants to leave and the employee can't keep their job while not producing. Most importantly at will employment is stated at the door so there is no confusion and both parties have the resources to be informed.

  • At Will Employment is not fair in the slightest.

    How can I chase the american dream if I fear discharge from my job? I need reliable steady income. I rely on my jobs income for every aspect of my life. If i am terminated then all my time invested and raises dissapear. Leaving me at base pay for another employer to start the cycle over again. My employer has a line a mile long to fill my place and continue production. I would gladly sacrifice my ability to quit at any time (loss of last paycheck or some other penalty for me quitting without notice) for job security. You can be fired 1 month before retirment to hire a friend of a friend to replace you.

    Documented proof of reason for termination should be a law.

  • Being let go because you asked a question

    I had a dealing with another employee, and he made me feel uncomfortable, I spoke to the owner and they told me I was being let go because I wasn't a team player. I did NY job as required, and never had any issues. It's not fair you are judged by credit for working for someone more favorable than seeing self employed, you are more at risk working for someone

  • There must be a concrete reason for firing someone. "At will" leaves room for firing someone just because one doesn't like someone.

    This happened to me at Microsoft. My manager didn't like me and I didn't like him. He threatened to fire me and I quit. I took it to the EEOC and the advocated for me as to his bullying. I received unemployment benefits. He was terminated a year later because of continued bad behavior.

  • There must be a concrete reason for firing someone. "At will" leaves room for firing someone just because one doesn't like someone.

    This happened to me at Microsoft. My manager didn't like me and I didn't like him. He threatened to fire me and I quit. I took it to the EEOC and the advocated for me as to his bullying. I received unemployment benefits. He was terminated a year later because of continued bad behavior.

  • At will employment allows for workplace corruption

    In theory, at will employment seems mutually beneficial, employees may quit and employers may fire unsatisfactory employees.
    However, the situation is not equal, as employers lose less than employees. An employer can redistribute the work load to continue business until a replacement is trained, and is relatively unaffected by firing an employee. On the other hand, employees may face long term unemployment if they are fired.
    In addition to being dangerous for employees, at will employment allows employers to discriminate against employees, or show unethical favoritism to employees. An employer could fire an employee, despite their satisfactory performance, for unethical reasons and yet be free of legal penalties because the employment is at will. As another user posted, there are only two instances in which an employer would reasonably refuse advance notice of termination. The first, is if the employer lacks managerial skills. The second, is if the employer lacks a just cause for terminating the employee.
    No one should be deprived of their financial security without just cause. The idea that people should not be deprived of things {liberty, property} is a fundamental part of our constitution. The fourth amendment protects the citizens from unreasonable search and seizures, or searches and seizures without probable cause. If it is unethical for an official to question someone without probable cause, 'just because,' is it not unethical for an employer to terminate someone without just cause?
    While it is true that governments and employers are not held to the same standards of behavior, it is also true that certain actions are unethical, period. Corruption by any other name, or by any other group or person, would smell as unethical.

  • At-will employment creates distrust from the start of the employment relationship.

    At-will employment is not fair to employees, employers or the health of business. In states where the at-will employment doctrine exists, employees know that their employer can terminate them at any time for any or no reason (as long as they do not violate discrimination laws under Title VII) and the employer knows the employee can quit at any time. Thus, from the very start of the employment relationship, there is distrust between the employee and employer. The employee will be less committed to the employer and the employer will be less committed to retaining and developing employees, and no longer see employees as valuable assets.

    There are those who argue that the at-will employment doctrine is balanced, as the employee can quit at any time and the employer can terminate the employee at any time. However the consequences of the employee quitting, even without notice, far outweigh the consequences for an employee that is terminated, even with some notice. The employer can typically shift work between other employees to continue business until a new employee is hired. The employer will typically have an easier time locating a new employee. However, the terminated employee will have lost income, lost benefits (such as health insurance) and will in most cases have a more difficult time locating new and adequate employment.

    A better alternative would be more akin to the just cause doctrine, when the employer must have just cause for terminating an employee, such as; threatening another employee or documented and persistent poor performance of the employee.

  • Employers and employees are NOT equals.

    Employees are a dime a dozen to the employer and when the employee wants an express contract (as allowed in legislation), it will never happen because there are 10 more candidates for the employer to choose from. Clearly, termination from the employer's side has a farther reaching effect then the other way around...

  • Employers and employees are NOT equals.

    Employees are a dime a dozen to the employer and when the employee wants an express contract (as allowed in legislation), it will never happen because there are 10 more candidates for the employer to choose from. Clearly, termination from the employer's side has a farther reaching effect then the other way around...

  • Depends on the employer's fairness.

    For example, I just went through a situation with my last employer to where because of the current market of the industry the company would be laying off. Since it's at will employment, the company terminated me due to my performance even though no one had ever evaluated me nor my fellow Co workers. We were chosen to be let go over others that had less knowledge of the job tasks, yet got paid higher wages than we were.

    Just one little example of bad business on the employer's part.
    On paper "at will" seems to be a good thing but when you leave it to the employer to be "fair" we can't do much but keep our fingers crossed.

  • Too much room for corruption.

    At-will employment is dangerous and outdated. It gives all the power to the employer, and no protection to the employee. Employees should have the right to know what they're being fired for-if anything, just as a courtesy, so they can improve as they move forward in their careers. It's not a lot to ask to give a reason upon termination. The only reason i can see that someone would fight against giving reason for termination is either a) they are too uncomfortable doing it, and in that case should not be in any management or supervisory position in the first place, or b) the reasons aren't fair or credible.


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