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  • Should it be a privilege?

    I'm not sure - personally I believe that being made to pay for certain treatments could persuade people to change their ways and stop harming their health. For example, a smoker could be persuaded to reduce or even stop their habit, if it was going to cost them more with added health costs.

  • Everyone deserves healthcare, but there are limits.

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.

  • Health care is a privilege

    Health care is a privilege because the government should not get involved in private business. The government does not get involved in car insurance or home insurance so why fiddle with health care. We are a free market country and we need to stay a free market country. “Free” health care might work in other countries but it won’t work here especially under the new Bernie Sanders plan. It’s just one less thing the government needs to mess with.

  • Healthcare is a Right

    Healthcare is a right. Everyone is entitled to live once they are born and in order to pursue happiness, one must be able to live how they choose and how best to sustain themselves and their families. Property, usually referring to land, housing and/or livestock, is the primary and most basic way of sustaining one’s self as well as a family. Happiness and property cannot be experienced or owned without life, or rather if one is not living. Healthcare is one of the ways how we in this day and age experience life to its fullest measure. If others intrude upon or interfere with it then that's an attack on liberty. Property and happiness are so greatly dependent upon Liberty.

  • Emergent care, Yes. Abuse of system by the lazy needs to stop

    Emergent care is at any emergency room, However what must stop is the abuse of the health care system. Just because you or your family member has the sniffles does not mean run to the doctor. Common sense is not common any more. Also hearing "I've been sick for two weeks" and they have not gone to their PCP. Or "my baby just started running a fever" yet they give no OTC medications. People need to be responsible for themselves.

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  • The Anatomy of a Fish

    Fish anatomy is the study of the form or morphology of fishes. It can be contrasted with fish physiology, Which is the study of how the component parts of fish function together in the living fish. [1] In practice, Fish anatomy and fish physiology complement each other, The former dealing with the structure of a fish, Its organs or component parts and how they are put together, Such as might be observed on the dissecting table or under the microscope, And the latter dealing with how those components function together in living fish.

    The anatomy of fish is often shaped by the physical characteristics of water, The medium in which fish live. Water is much denser than air, Holds a relatively small amount of dissolved oxygen, And absorbs more light than air does. The body of a fish is divided into a head, Trunk and tail, Although the divisions between the three are not always externally visible. The skeleton, Which forms the support structure inside the fish, Is either made of cartilage, In cartilaginous fish, Or bone in bony fish. The main skeletal element is the vertebral column, Composed of articulating vertebrae which are lightweight yet strong. The ribs attach to the spine and there are no limbs or limb girdles. The main external features of the fish, The fins, Are composed of either bony or soft spines called rays which, With the exception of the caudal fins, Have no direct connection with the spine. They are supported by the muscles which compose the main part of the trunk. [2] The heart has two chambers and pumps the blood through the respiratory surfaces of the gills and on round the body in a single circulatory loop. [3] The eyes are adapted for seeing underwater and have only local vision. There is an inner ear but no external or middle ear. Low frequency vibrations are detected by the lateral line system of sense organs that run along the length of the sides of fish, And these respond to nearby movements and to changes in water pressure. [2]

  • Healthcare is privilege. -Anonymous

    100% of people interviewed said health care is a privilege. The government has to listen to majority. It is not fair to tax people more for health care, What if they do not want it? This is what people hated about Obama Care, That they were forced to pay for health care.

  • Health Care Is a Privilege

    For all of human history health care has been a privilege. Advancement and research in the field takes money; therefore, Those able to fund much needed research will be at an advantage. It seems to me that the want for better health care for your family is a good incentive to work hard, Innovate, And succeed in life - if health care is right provided by government then the incentives for personal achievement will become diminished by some amount.

  • Healthcare is a Right, Not Privilege

    No, healthcare is not a privilege but a right. The US Declaration of Independence lists three inalienable rights; life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Within the idea of "life" comes health and thriving, thus healthcare is a right. To deny healthcare is to impede on the right to life.

  • All citizens have a right to healthcare.

    Healthcare should not be a privilege reserved only for those who can afford it. All people are humans, and humans are imperfect beings. Everyone is subjective to illness, and people should not be punished or denied help when they get sick just because they cannot afford to pay for it. As civil human beings, we should wish our fellow man well enough to want to insure that everyone has access to healthcare.

  • Healthcare is a right

    Healthcare is a right, Not a privilege! Every human deserves the right to good healthcare. We all deserve the same opportunities when it comes to our physical and mental health. There are effective ways to regulate health care and the U. S. Needs to consider them! Healthcare is a right for all.

  • Not a right

    Healthcare is a service provided by another, Usually a doctor or medical practitioner. To claim that healthcare as a “right” means someone must claim a right to the services of the health-care provider. One should not have the "right" to claim services from another. Further. Medical services differ. Some doctors are more skilled than others. Does that imagined "right" extend to selecting a doctor?

  • We simply can't give please healthcare away

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.

  • There is a limit to what we can give

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.


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