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  • Virtual world is better

    It is better because it doesn't provide us any kind of tension. Although we can be away from all rules and regulations of real life. The truth is that no one can remain away from this social media. It also keeps us in touch with the whole world. Thank you.

  • Virtual world has fun

    In virtual world we can do anything we want bit in reality we are bounded by rules and regulations and system . Virtual world can give us more fun than the real world.Virtual world is very cool and awesome than the real world.Real world gives stress , stress and stress.

  • We can do dangerous things

    Virtual is better because we can do dangerous things, experiment or any research which may be hazard to life if done in real world. Anyone can make sure this structure or chemical is safe by checking in virtual world, then apply it to real world.That's all in my opinion. Thanks

  • It is better!

    I have played a lot of games through out me life, and I have played the Virtual games and then the real games. Anyway, it always seems that the Virtual world games are better than the real one. It's like that all the time when I play both. Have you noticed that?

  • The virtual world is better than the real one

    How could it not be? There are no job shortages, no pollution, things don't naturally deteriorate over time, it's cleaner. I started playing the sims when the first one came out. I wanted to spend every waking moment there. Things aren't as complicated, you can look any way you want, you just have so many options you don't have in real life.

  • No they are not as good and you are lying to yourself

    Another thing that makes real life so real is the richness of the sensory experience that it provides: sight, sound, smell, touch, taste, balance, movement, temperature, pain, and emotions (not exactly a sense per se, but experienced acutely in sensory form). Yes, technology has made great advances in replicating the experience of real life, for example, improved visual graphics and sound (e.G., video games), the sensation of balance and movement (e.G., Wii), and, yes, emotionally provocative content, though often artificially created and irrelevant to real life (e.G., FarmVille) or kept at a distance (e.G., Facebook). But, as far as coming even close to the full spectrum of sensory experience? Fuggedaboutit!

    Real life offers us experiences that are open-ended, giving us the opportunity to create whatever box we choose based on what the universe of options has to offer. The only limits that exist are those of our creativity and the physical parameters of real life.

    Real life is also value driven, meaning the direction that we take our lives is based on what we deem most important. As a result, life has personal meaning and relevance to us. And with that meaning and relevance comes investment, that is to say, caring about what we do and where we direct our lives. Technology, in particular social media that enables us to stay connected with friends and build online communities based on shared values and activities, is moving in that direction, but, as Malcolm Gladwell has pointed out, these wired connections aren't nearly as powerful as many would like to believe (the uprising in Tunisia was not really the Twitter Revolution).

    For much of the technology in which we are immersed, as Susan Greenfield has argued, process, action, and achieving goals trump perspective, context, or relationships. This connection between real life and values is perhaps the most powerful disincentive for the excessive use of technology. Values, meaning, and relevance give real life its power and most of what technology offers is devoid of it.

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, real life, and much of the meaning and satisfaction accrued from it, comes from our relationships with others. The development of our social lives is essential for our psychological and emotional well being. Yes, social media are obviously social in nature, but I see it as being "social lite," because it limits the richness of human interactions, or "social safe" because it keeps relationships at a comfortable distance.

    Fundamentally, technology creates a mediated and low-resolution approximation of life that does offer utilitarian benefits and some entertainment value. But is it "real" enough to want to substitute much of real life? I don't think so. I'll take high-resolution and unmediated life any time.

  • No they are not as good and you are lying to yourself

    Another thing that makes real life so real is the richness of the sensory experience that it provides: sight, sound, smell, touch, taste, balance, movement, temperature, pain, and emotions (not exactly a sense per se, but experienced acutely in sensory form). Yes, technology has made great advances in replicating the experience of real life, for example, improved visual graphics and sound (e.G., video games), the sensation of balance and movement (e.G., Wii), and, yes, emotionally provocative content, though often artificially created and irrelevant to real life (e.G., FarmVille) or kept at a distance (e.G., Facebook). But, as far as coming even close to the full spectrum of sensory experience? Fuggedaboutit!

    Real life offers us experiences that are open-ended, giving us the opportunity to create whatever box we choose based on what the universe of options has to offer. The only limits that exist are those of our creativity and the physical parameters of real life.

    Real life is also value driven, meaning the direction that we take our lives is based on what we deem most important. As a result, life has personal meaning and relevance to us. And with that meaning and relevance comes investment, that is to say, caring about what we do and where we direct our lives. Technology, in particular social media that enables us to stay connected with friends and build online communities based on shared values and activities, is moving in that direction, but, as Malcolm Gladwell has pointed out, these wired connections aren't nearly as powerful as many would like to believe (the uprising in Tunisia was not really the Twitter Revolution).

    For much of the technology in which we are immersed, as Susan Greenfield has argued, process, action, and achieving goals trump perspective, context, or relationships. This connection between real life and values is perhaps the most powerful disincentive for the excessive use of technology. Values, meaning, and relevance give real life its power and most of what technology offers is devoid of it.

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, real life, and much of the meaning and satisfaction accrued from it, comes from our relationships with others. The development of our social lives is essential for our psychological and emotional well being. Yes, social media are obviously social in nature, but I see it as being "social lite," because it limits the richness of human interactions, or "social safe" because it keeps relationships at a comfortable distance.

    Fundamentally, technology creates a mediated and low-resolution approximation of life that does offer utilitarian benefits and some entertainment value. But is it "real" enough to want to substitute much of real life? I don't think so. I'll take high-resolution and unmediated life any time.

  • Virtual world cannot be better that real world

    Virtual world can never be as good as real world. Virtual world is merely an escape from reality.
    Playing games online might be fun but the physical strength can can be build only through out door games. Also sitting in front of a screen have a bad impact on eyes.
    Not only that but the face to face interactions are totally different from the web cam interactions, otherwise long distance relationships would have not been a failure in majority of cases.

  • Trees Need Wind; Humans Need Stress

    Virtual worlds are a great way to break from reality, but the only reason they are so good is because we know what we are escaping from. People have evolved to face devastating challenges. Without them we become fragile. Just like trees that grow without wind, people can collapse on themselves if they spend too long detached from reality.

  • The virtual world can never be better than the real one.



    The virtual world can never be better than the real one. For one, virtual sex is will never be as good
    as sex in real life with another human being. Also, all it takes to get rid of the virtual
    world is a power outage. The virtual
    world is only good for entertainment.



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