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  • Theatre is a form of art which is slowly dying in today's society, movies are generally increasing popularity.

    --> Not many actors and actresses perform in theatres, mainly in movies.
    --> If you want to see a theatre production, you have to go somewhere exclusive.
    --> Plays are more expensive.
    --> Movies are worldwide.
    --> Special effects in movies.

    In today's society, movies are significantly outstanding in technology and popularity. This significantly increases the special effects in movies otherwise plays are more exclusive and there is a low amount of professional actors and actresses performing plays. Due to these reasons that I have classified here for you, it would be obviously clear by my second and third speaker that theatre is a dying art form. Movies are generally increasing popularity.

    2 main aspects of this topic is the fact that not many actors and actresses perform in theatres, they mainly perform in movies. Another aspect is the fact that theatre productions are produced in exclusive areas, whether it is the country or in a stylish city. Actors and actresses are the main highlights of a theatre production and a film. They are used to tell a story of which it is from a real life story or from something made up.

    The exclusive aspect of a theatre production is that they are rarely found in the area that is enclosed around you. On the other movies are produced worldwide and are performed by many famous actors and actresses, such as Leonardo Di Caprio and Hugh Jackman.

  • Look At Society

    Theatre (especially musical theatre) is by far my favorite art form. Seeing it and being in it gives me emotions and glee like nothing else. It is amazing, but society does not really agree. Many people consider theatre to be "gay" and "stupid". Most people go to movies, not live theatre. Many schools are cutting arts programs. Many kids dream of being the next Tim Tebo or next Ariana Grande, not to be the next Barbara Steisand, Lea Michele or Norbet Leo Butz. Many people do not realize that theatre is moe than just singing and dancing. They do not realize how comedic, risqué, and spectacular it can be. Most people do not listen to showtunes. Theatre is getting so costly, so many people can't afford to see it. Many people only see shows while in New York or at the West End. Theatre is commonly thought of as a tourist activity, not something to do often.

  • Isn't it obvious.

    I have a hard time believing that those, Even in a forum about theater, Can actually disagree with this as a dying form. History changes and is changing in a much more miraculous way. Theater is silly to most, It is risque, Long, Expensive and difficult to understand. And that is my point, When have we as a society accepted these as improvements upon a form.

  • It's "dying" because it no longer tries to push boundaries as an art form.

    Todays theatre culture orbits around old works that fans call "classics" so no one is actively pursuing change within the community. New plays, and musicals in particular, just reuse popular tropes and trademarks theatre-fans drool over just cause they are "theatre people." There's nothing broadway provides in 2018 that you can't get from a movie or even some cheap netflix original series. For the most part, theatre has grown stale and unoriginal, and unless it can stop living in the past, it won't survive much longer.

  • Theatre is dying

    We are experiencing the last decades of the theatre. It’s not going to die completely, but from now on it will be on life support. I go to the theatre quite often, I’m in my early 60s, and I’m usually the youngest person in the audience. Working middle-aged people don’t have the time or can’t afford it. The younger generation can’t turn off their phones nor sit still. Theatre education programs that create the next generation of theatergoers are being cut. Universities have saturated the market with worthless MFAs. Splashy mindless musicals will be the last vestige of the theatre before it becomes a dead art, like cave painting. It will become a tourist art; something people do once in their life so that they can say they saw a play once. But substantial theatre; theatre that can change the world, or change an individual heart is going the way of daily newspapers.

  • ... But it will reinvent itself.

    The conventional theatre is indeed dying. Audiences are ageing and funding sources are drying up. It is subject to the same disruption from technology that has impacted the TV/Cable industries.

    In the end, theatre is about storytelling. Live theatre's biggest challenge is to break through the barriers of the theatre wall by increasing access through technology while maintaining the theatrical experience for those attending live. Anthologies, immersive theatre and greater audience engagement will all be critical.

  • Sadly it is

    I think it has been dying but I also think that after the creation of musicals like Hamilton, it has made theatre a little bit more popular than it has been. I'm still at a loss for words when constantly people say that they would much rather just see a movie rather than see a play or musical. In theatre you get a connection with the actors and audience that you just can't get in movies. Theatre can be so unpredictable sometimes that you can see the same show twice and be completely different experiences.

  • Sadly, yes (kind of).

    I don't think that theatre will ever TRULY die out. It will always exist, and there will always be those passionate about it, but it's just not as popular as other art mediums nowadays, which have better, more creative, and more entertaining forms of storytelling. I'm not one for theatre myself, but if you like it, keep on trying to keep it alive. Any form of art should try and be as well preserved as possible, since art is humanity's greatest achievement. Whether it be film, music, painting, theatre, etc. KEEP. IT. ALIVE.

  • All living things die

    The theatre that is dying is theatre that refuses to adapt.

    Big theatre, big budgets, big actors, big designers- put them all together and you get some okay story telling that's fiscally conservative and concerned with the bottom line for a good reason- they've got a lot of people to support.

    The theatre that is coming alive doesn't live in a building. Doesn't worry about insurance. Doesn't operate with a stage manager, a casting director, a props artisan, a carver, Equity actors, and big name designers/directors. It's fiscally unconcerned. It comes pouring from the heart and splashing out of the gutters.

  • Regional Theatres across the country are closing.

    For those who make the argument that theatre has been around forever are forgetting that 'forever' did not include modern technology. How long can theatre compete with an APP that provides cheap entertainment in the comfort of one's own home at any hour of the day or night? Outside of theatre lovers, (who do not reflect the 'majority' of society,) and the WWII generation, (who is dead or dying), who is keeping theatre alive? The argument here isn't whether or not theatre is worthy. I suspect anyone writing here thinks it is already. The question is, 'is it a dying art form.' Meaning, if no one comes to watch it, can it still exist. (Beyond back yards and tiny black box performance spaces.)

  • To quote Dr. Viktor Frankenstein, "IT'S ALIVE! IT'S ALIVE!"

    Theatre has been taking its last breath for thousands of years...Until it's miraculously resuscitated by some new kid on the block: a Tony Kushner, a Lin Manuel Miranda, a Lauren Yee, etc.

    As John Steinbeck so rightly said, “The theater is the only institution in the world which has been dying for four thousand years and has never succumbed. It requires tough and devoted people to keep it alive.”

  • Theatre is not dead.

    I believe that theatre is not dead because of all the people that still believe in it. Theatre has been alive for about 2500 years or so, its basically a legacy and will continue to live on no matter how many times its altered. Theatre will never change therefore it will stay alive.

  • Musical theatre is not dying because of dedicated supporters, its previous prevalence in society, and adaptability to society.

    First, musical theatre is not a dying art form because of its dedicated supporters. These supporters often have creative rules for conversation and their way of life. They often accept the same stereotypes and have the same nicknames for certain people. Supporters of musicals, in general, are growing into a larger number, seen in the gross profit of Broadway tickets. In the 1984-1985 season, the gross profit for tickets was $209,179,985, while the 2015-2016 season raised $1,373,253,725 in ticket sales. Money inflation plays a part in this rise, but it is mostly due to a rise in popularity. Musical theatre will not die because of its devoted fan base.
    Second, musical theatre will not go down in society because of its previous prevalence and lengthy history. Musical theatre began in 487 BC in the Dionysia, a festival celebrating Dionysus, and has lasted ever since. Something that has lasted so long is not likely to lose prominence easily. At its inception, theatre was not as popular as it would become starting in the nineteenth century. People who could afford to purchase tickets started frequenting the theatre around this time and invited their relatives and friends, causing a rise in popularity. Musical theatre has lasted long past the 1920s, however. There was said to be a “Golden Age” of theatre from 1943 until 1959. This is stated because of the numerous debuts of now-popular composers and the alteration in storytelling. These fresh composers proposed many iconic musicals during this time, such as Carousel, Oklahoma, Annie Get Your Gun, Guys and Dolls, The King and I, My Fair Lady, West Side Story, The Music Man, The Sound of Music, and Gypsy. Musical theatre will not become a lost art form because of its long-lasting positive status in history preventing it from doing so.
    Lastly, musical theatre is not dying because it is adapting to our progressive society and pleasing a larger number of people. One way in which it is changing is the style of music. Just fifty years ago, all the songs from musicals would be well-loved show tunes with a small range of diversity. Now, if one travels to Broadway and views multiple shows, he will notice the diversity: rap songs in Hamilton, old club songs in Chicago, and music from the 1960s-‘70s in Beautiful: the Carole King Musical. In the realm of public outings, most people state that movies are more popular than musicals, but in reality, they are not. Instead of musicals living in the shadows of movies, they thrive under this new reign with a number of recorded musicals. In addition to popular culture and music, the fashion of musicals is changing. Performers now wear more revealing costumes than those worn in older times of Broadway. Lastly, musicals are adapting to common themes of America’s progressive society, enticing people who are connected to those parts of culture towards theatre. Musical theatre is not being replaced with any other forms of entertainment because of its adaptation to modern society.

  • Musical theatre is not dying because of dedicated supporters, its previous prevalence in society, and adaptability to society.

    First, musical theatre is not a dying art form because of its dedicated supporters. These supporters often have creative rules for conversation and their way of life. They often accept the same stereotypes and have the same nicknames for certain people. Supporters of musicals, in general, are growing into a larger number, seen in the gross profit of Broadway tickets. In the 1984-1985 season, the gross profit for tickets was $209,179,985, while the 2015-2016 season raised $1,373,253,725 in ticket sales. Money inflation plays a part in this rise, but it is mostly due to a rise in popularity. Musical theatre will not die because of its devoted fan base.
    Second, musical theatre will not go down in society because of its previous prevalence and lengthy history. Musical theatre began in 487 BC in the Dionysia, a festival celebrating Dionysus, and has lasted ever since. Something that has lasted so long is not likely to lose prominence easily. At its inception, theatre was not as popular as it would become starting in the nineteenth century. People who could afford to purchase tickets started frequenting the theatre around this time and invited their relatives and friends, causing a rise in popularity. Musical theatre has lasted long past the 1920s, however. There was said to be a “Golden Age” of theatre from 1943 until 1959. This is stated because of the numerous debuts of now-popular composers and the alteration in storytelling. These fresh composers proposed many iconic musicals during this time, such as Carousel, Oklahoma, Annie Get Your Gun, Guys and Dolls, The King and I, My Fair Lady, West Side Story, The Music Man, The Sound of Music, and Gypsy. Musical theatre will not become a lost art form because of its long-lasting positive status in history preventing it from doing so.
    Lastly, musical theatre is not dying because it is adapting to our progressive society and pleasing a larger number of people. One way in which it is changing is the style of music. Just fifty years ago, all the songs from musicals would be well-loved show tunes with a small range of diversity. Now, if one travels to Broadway and views multiple shows, he will notice the diversity: rap songs in Hamilton, old club songs in Chicago, and music from the 1960s-‘70s in Beautiful: the Carole King Musical. In the realm of public outings, most people state that movies are more popular than musicals, but in reality, they are not. Instead of musicals living in the shadows of movies, they thrive under this new reign with a number of recorded musicals. In addition to popular culture and music, the fashion of musicals is changing. Performers now wear more revealing costumes than those worn in older times of Broadway. Lastly, musicals are adapting to common themes of America’s progressive society, enticing people who are connected to those parts of culture towards theatre. Musical theatre is not being replaced with any other forms of entertainment because of its adaptation to modern society.

  • Rather adapting that dying

    Modern theatre is where both classical and contemporary plays are performed. As long as something, especially in the sphere of art, does not bring profit, it has to change to be accepted, liked, hence paid for. I would say theatre is not dying, but coming into the shadow. To be popularized, it needs to be advertised among the new audience. I personally know many young people from my college who have attended a contemporary theatre play for the first time, and were amazed by the state of modern theatre and by the high quality of the performance. To conclude, I would like to say that theatre should be popularized, because it is definitely worth it.

  • Humans need humans

    I am personally of the belief that modern theatre, and theatre throughout history, has been modeled off of the ancient rhetoric used in the courts of Greece. The rules of rhetoric (logos, pathos, ethos), also apply deeply to theatre- except instead of it just being a speech from one to the masses (like so many asides in Shakespeare), it's a complete submerging into the world of the rhetoric itself. There will always be a need for people to feel a real, human connection to be swayed in anything- I think theatre today is taking the spot of the social change activist that once was held by Greecian orators.

  • Theatre has been around for THOUSANDS of years

    If theatre can survive drastic changes like the invention of electricity, the new architectural advances, changing fashion, and many other things, then it can adapt and survive to whatever else our society throws at it. Theatre has been "dying" since it was invented, and it's still around. That should say something.

  • Movies are just commercial

    We can take for an example : commercial music, it lasts for like 3 months and then everyone forgets it. It is also what is happening to movies, it's just a matter of time until someone says "forget this, here's this new innovating thing", and they are gone. Nevertheless, for theatre, there will always be people who are passionate about performing plays or watching them, Being so, theatre isn't a dying art form

  • The best thing for THEATRE was the invention of cinema and movies...

    Theatre should have almost nothing to do with shows or entertainment. It is a place of aliveness, organic interaction, modern rituals and real activating playfulness. Cinema and movies (and computers) have freed theatre from the burden of creating entertainment and "shows" that offer the sometimes needed escapist processes and therefore opened the way for theatre's real mission. Now theatre can become the place of true life and even truth in all of its possible levels. The direction is still a little bit "unseen" but it is already happening happening happening. Theatre has to transform completely that is comparable to dying but it will very quickly be reborn and it will cause the greatest revolution ever in human civilization. No other field of society can produce the processes that we need to maintain humanness and our aliveness. In the age of violent and uncontrolled virtuality we will need the balancing power that comes from "organic interaction culture". Theatre and theatrical processes can produce this but the architecture of the processes is still waiting to be created and designed. Theatre professionals need move energy and intention from "show culture" to a "process culture" that will bring people really what they need. Especially the theatrical training has to start from children and young people because most people over thirty (unfortunately) are difficult to return in connection with their creative aliveness and their own "theatricality" skills and abilities. Hope is still not lost for anyone. If you really desire to return to your aliveness, go to theatre, especially find a theatrical process that will help you to feel, move, express and breath. (instead of dissapearing into watching more and more movies and fall deeper into a state of passiveness and illness) (I want to say that I also appreciate great movies, but also there are thousands of terrible nonsense being created every year and multiply that with some millions and you will get the number how many nonsense movies are being watched every year)

  • It is changing, not dying.

    There are many supporting reasons why it is and why it is not. But honestly, there are so many universities with minors and majors in the theatre field. And as a musical theatre major, they are extremely competitive. One thought is that not many young people enjoy the theatre, but in reality, there are just as many children, teens, and young adults that love the art as hockey or golf. I like to think it will be around for a while. I has obviously changed from the "golden age" of theatre when it was the main source of entertainment, and it will never be at that point again. But with contemporary musicals and plays evolving, they are also developing new audiences. Younger ones especially. It will not die, but it will change. Who knows how it will be 50 years from now, but I'm certain it will still be here and still be considered an art form.


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