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  • Unless there is a way to regulate who prints a gun, then yes they should be illegal.

    The whole point of having guns regulated by the law is to keep them out of peoples hands that would use them in a crime of passion, among other things. If people can just by pass laws for getting gun then why does it matter to have those laws? I understand that printed guns dont last as long as manufactured guns but they can still kill.

  • No way to track these guns

    These guns are made out of plastic, meaning that someone can use carry these guns through security. These guns can be taken apart and be put back together, and can fire numerous rounds. The key component of a regular gun has been printed and it works fine. These guns are a clear danger and are impossible to trace or track. 3D printers and the material used to make these guns (some sort of plastic) are extremely expensive, but extra precautions should be taken in the case of these undetectable and untraceable guns.

  • Yes, it's different with printing.

    Gun control can be debated against when we're dealing going to the shop and buying such weapons. Someone now could purchase a printer and print up a firearm or parts of a firearm without anyone's knowledge. It wont be a problem for now, since 3d printers are fairly expensive, but later on I think it will. Perhaps the designers could create some way of prohibiting the patterns and styles of firearm and firearm parts.

  • Guns hurt 3D printed or not

    First off, I feel like this question isn't focusing on the right aspect of the controversy surrounding the argument in the first place. The 3D printed guns themselves aren't the foundation of the problem. It's whether or not blueprints for these weapons should be released to the internet.

    That being said, Things on the internet are next to impossible to regulate or manage and consequently, The choice to release these blueprints to the public would be an irreversible and catastrophic one. Allowing anyone on the internet to have access to these files would also pose a threat to the safety of the general public. Being made of plastic, These firearms could pass through security checkpoints that were employed with the intention of maintaining general welfare.

    In addition, Putting aside legal questions, This debate raises a lot of moral and ethical questions. Rather than arguing the legality of 3D printed guns, We should instead take philosophical standpoints such as utilitarianism and libertarianism

  • Cause why not

    Why not
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  • Should be illegal

    They can be purchased or made by anyone with or without a license (how shootings will be started), They work just as well as real guns so they are just as dangerous, They are untraceable through metal detectors so someone could take one through airport security and no one would know.

  • Boooooooooooooooooooommm goes dynamite

    It just is great they are kewl and where then over to the house and which is where over here there are wherever here however that you . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thanks for reading

  • I dont like make titles

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is the first city in the United States to officially ban the use of 3D printers to manufacture firearms. This was six months after a Texas-based company published digital blueprints for a homemade handgun. In philadelphia there were 331 murders in 2012. Which made philadelphia one of the most violent cities in america. So if they were to allow people to print a firearm on a 3D printer then imagine what would happen. Many people would most likely get hurt or killed.

  • Of course they should!

    Okay, I know that opening statement made me sound kind of anti-gun laws. That's not my stance. If you're a hunter, you should be allowed to own a rifle, no question. And if you're one of those rich guys who believes he's protecting his family, then yes you can own a gun too. (Not that the gun in the sealed container in your closet will help when somebody has a gun to your face.) But seriously? This entire situation can be broken down into one insane sentence.

    As of now, you and anybody with enough money can go to a staples and buy the equipment necessary to download and print out a handgun.

    Now sure, the 3-D printer is around $1300, but you know what else used to cost that much? Normal printers. Now they range from under $100. When you run out of ink, it's seemingly cheaper to go out and buy a whole new printer instead of a cartridge of ink. So the situation is that anybody with a grudge and a single bullet can print a gun and kill someone. People point out it can only fire one bullet, but one bullet is enough! One murder is not better than zero murders! I personally guarantee you, and will be willing to bet my life that (unless this becomes illegal), that you will see a post on a news site saying something like "Somebody killed someone else using a gun they printed from home". If you think I'm wrong, you may want to go to a proctologist to see if you can get your head removed from your own ass.

  • Three word title.

    Although guns like the new Liberator could be dangerous, making them illegal won't solve anything. If criminals actually started using these to bypass security, they would have guns, and everyone else won't. If this actually becomes a problem, almost all forms of gun control will have to be stopped for the safety of everyone. At that point, the only one who can protect you is yourself. This is a terrible gun with only one shot anyway, so it's not like it's possible to mass murder with it. After using your single shot, you'd be screwed.

    Also, we have always had the right to make guns.

  • The Same Principle of Prohibition Failure Applies Here Too

    The story is always the same. Whether it's drugs, alcohol, or abortions, prohibitions always lead to one thing: a black market for the prohibited item. Each of the prohibitions stated above created a black market.

    The same goes for guns, and ergo, 3D guns as well. Making guns illegal will just give the black market more money and power - more crimes will be committed, and there will be no decrease in the amount of murders; in fact, there may even be more murders than before.

    The same principle applies for 3D guns. The new prohibition on them will just create a thriving black market for them, which is easier than ever now that the files needed for the object can all be placed on the computer. No murders will be stopped, and the law will be useless.

  • No, they should not be illegal

    Prohibition always leads to crime. As soon as people are denied access to 3D printed guns, a black market would develop and probably cause the public more trouble than if the guns were legal. Therefore I think they should be legal, but have strict laws that limit their use to prevent large amounts of crime occurring.

  • Regulation is next to impossible. Please don't release them

    I support 3d printing and I also 3d print with different materials. May be not right now but 3d printing tech is soon catching up. In couple of years you can print a gun with just a click of button. Putting the legal questions aside, This issue has lot of ethical concerns. Guns are dangerous, Small or big. They could cause injury to self or others.
    With 3d printing becoming widely accessible, Having access to the gun files would only be adding fuel to the fire. It will be next to impossible to regulate these files once they are out.

  • I don't think you should be able to MAKE a GUN!

    People are going to hurt someone or themselves even a kid could touch one it is not safety is like a DIY gun making you could kill yourself. It is not good!Schools have 3D printer and one kid could desire one by getting a link online and people haven't gotten hurt yet but I guaranty someone is going to get hurt!

  • 3d printing makes it impossible to regulate the making of anything.

    Face it. 3d printing is the end of regulation of individuals unless you regulate the access to the printers and materials themselves. You can print guns, drugs, organs, modified plant parts, chemicals, parts for machines and use designs that can be redily modified for unlimited experimentation. New 3d machines are printing in steel and biological material. Resolution down to nano particle size are available. Deconstructing an item and then replicating it will become extremely common practice.

  • The basic facts

    3d printing is NOT just downloading a 3d model and clicking print and you have a firearm. It does not make guns anymore accessible to the general public than before. The equivalent of the Liberator handgun could be made with one trip to Home Depot and less than $10. If you can 3d print firearm parts and assemble a gun then you could easily build it with alternate methods. The argument that they are not detectable is moot because the ammunition will always be metal.

  • No they should not be illegal.

    If a person had any criminal intention with using a 3d printed gun, it would cost them a lot of money and time, and by the time it was done being made, they most likely would have changed their minds or moved on to a different plan. Since they can not have added speed attachments they are less dangerous then real guns.

  • Way of selfdefense

    Good way for poor people to have some thing for self defense,also you think plastic gun can kill 22 kid like in sandy hoax, it a single shot plastic gun,not that accurate........... And if you want to ban any of my gun I will kindly give it to you, but first you have to pry it from my cold dead hand

  • I think is is fine

    Technology is always moving forward and you can stop everything. The government only want to ban it so that the larger companies can be taxed selling and making their guns. People have freedom of speech. Why don't people have freedom of information. For example people in the UK cannot watch American shows legally as they are aired except in some rare cases


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