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  • He was courageous

    While everyone has their faults, Chris should be remembered as the person who put their mind to something and did it. He wanted to escape the capitalist society he grew up in and live off the land. He wanted to live in a world where there were no secrets and no deceit. Although he wasn't able to come back from his Alaskan adventure, had he been able to do it all over again, he would've. There were also many other accomplishments that Chris had during his life. Chris was a well trained outdoors man by the time he walked into the Alaskan bush. He canoed to Mexico, survived in the desert, hitch-hiked for thousands of miles and impacted many people's lives. All of those things aside, he should be admired simply for the fact that he had the courage to take the life that he was unhappy with and change it, knowing the future would be difficult.

  • He knew what he was doing

    Chris was a young man who was brave enough to walk into the wilderness with little supplies. Throughout the book he hitchhiked and was warned about the conditions, nothing could change his mind. He made friendships along the way and he attempts to keep in touch with his friend all the way until he walked in to the Alaskan wilderness. In the wild he kept a journal about what he ate and saw. He was able to hunt game and gather fruits and plants.

  • More Positives than Negatives

    Chris was an incredible man that I would've liked to meet. He was so light-hearted that made more differences than most on the planet. He helped the homeless for one, in which many wouldn't even think about doing. How is that not admirable? More people should be like him honestly. When people talk about Chris McCandless and his life and death, they always seem to bring up that he "hurt his family" by abandoning them. What they don't know is the backstory and the reason why he made the choices he made. Learning that you're a bastard child can leave a toll on anyone and could lead to unhealthy coping mechanisms. Chris' choice of coping with the discovery was just to live out in nature which is HIS choice in the first place and not a bad one at all. Every good thing he has done outweighs any bad.

  • A life worth living.

    Chris is a young man who should be admired for the way he lived his life. He graduated at the top of his class from Emory after growing up in an unfortunate family situation. The money he had amassed over his years leading to his college graduation was all donated to OXFAM, a charity fighting hunger. He became independent at a young age and was open to a life on the road. People today see that as more of a failure in life than anything else. Chris saw it as a pure way of living and it made him become a better person. He had a positive affect on everyone he met through his journey and it is evident today that the short time he spent with them, impacted their lives forever. It is hard to find a random young man in the middle of no where and be able to create such a special bond with a total stranger is a unique trait not many people have yet was one of Chris's greatest attributes. In Chris's short life he accomplished more than most people will in a long life. Chris lived a life worth living just in the wild.

  • Pursuer and Per-severer

    Chris McCandless should be admired due to the fact that he fulfilled his dream of going and surviving into the wild of Alaska. There were many opportunities when people offered to help him, but he persisted on doing it on his own to pursue his personal goal. Many people in todays world set personal goals and end up not succeeding them. However, Chris McCandless did, he was a pursuer and a per-severer.

  • Are we happy?

    Chris McCandless was a person looking for something that normally alludes a person working under the system, happiness. People tell you to work hard in school, to go to college, to get a good job, to support a family, which will lead to happiness. This has been the "magic formula" that has caused a lot of people like Chris to end up dead from their own hand. Chris died living his dream and he was happy. Those who put Chris down for finding his happiness are challenged by him because he didn't lived by the "magic formula." I challenged these people to break out of this formula and really find what makes you happy.

  • As a child, I wanted to live like him.

    In my eyes, he is definitely admired, and by many. Those who envy and appreciate his ability to drop everything distracting him from living a life of appreciation instead of by the book of the social norm; those who realized he did things to overcome fear, not only test himself against the trials of the seasons and environments; and then those who wanted to be him before they heard about him, but couldn't leave their life behind for one reason or another. This man, albeit he disregarded any feelings about how his disappearance would've affected his family, took the initiative of making himself happy without considering anyone else's opinions. Nearly no one, then and now, can say they live this way. I believe no one person can say that they are truly happy. Everyone answers to someone, and he lived by his own word so he didn't have to answer to someone else's beckoning. Throughout my life, I have daydreamed of living the way he did, although maybe not so rough, and with slightly more supplies. The traveling, having no one question your decisions, living by your own consequences, and the freedom of just being free is admirable in it's own. Most never leave the town in which they're raised, or even go far from their family, much less have the gall to enlist in such a journey. He didn't deserve to gain recognition from his death, he deserved to gain recognition from the successes he gained and trials he overcame during the excursion he completed in such a short time.

  • He should definitely be admired.

    I think that CM accomplished some pretty amazing things, and though he may be called selfish or cruel, anyone that researches his story thouroughly enough will realize that he's hardly either of those things. He had reasons for every action he took; McCandless' story is a complex one that shouldn't be generalized by those who knew little about him or the case. I think that Chris deserves accolades for changing the lives of so many people, for surviving so many days in the wild, for giving away his money, and I could go on and on.. I really admire him and think that more people should take a glimpse at the world through his lens.
    - westonab, cofc

  • He was REAL.

    Chris McCandless had the courage to live his dream, even if that meant giving up his life. He was "real" in the sense that he saw that he was unhappy with his current life as well as the people in it and the negative aspects of civilization, and chose to do something about it! How many people do you know that are unhappy with almost every aspect in their life? For example, their job, friend group, love life, and/or possible stigma or oppression due to an aspect of their identity. These individuals make it clear to the world that they are unsatisfied, but at the end of the day they never do anything to change their lifestyles or try to make themselves happy due to fear of what other people will say.

    A trait that Chris McCandless had that most of us lack is the characteristic of individuality. He never stopped to question what would make other people happy through his actions. He solely cared for his individual happiness and chose to live purely for himself. Many argueably will state that this trait makes Chris selfish. I argue that this makes him authentic because the act of choosing to live for your sole happiness is an act that most of us do not have the courage to do.

  • He should be

    Chris McCandless should be admired. I do not know of many people who could have done what he did and survived for as long as he did. Chris's death was truly unfortunate, but it doesn't mean he didn't know what he was doing while he was doing it. He wouldn't have lasted for as long as he did if he didn't. Chris's cause of death was said to be starvation, which was most likely caused by a factor Chris couldn't have foreseen. Chris lived his life to the fullest until the very end- not many of us will be able to say the same when it is our time, and to me that is very admirable.

  • He was unprepared.

    He was unprepared even after he was warned countless times by people that he met on his way to Alaska. He was selfish and didn't care how his actions affected his friends and family. Granted, he tried to leave the bus but was unable to but that wasn't until after he had hurt countless people.

  • Selfishness should not be cheerished.

    He felt no responsibility towards people who has raised him, invested on him, liked him. He had no sense of duty towards anyone. I see nothing admirable in a selfish act of a white priviledged man when millions of people in the world need help. He could die helping people in Africa, South East Asia, etc. That would make me admire him.

  • Admired for what?

    What kind of guy "tests" himself in the wilderness by camping in the luxury of a bus? A pathetic one. McCandless shouldn't be admired and his story shouldn't have made it to print or to the screen. What's the lesson here? Stay out of the Alaskan wilderness! Better yet, here's another: Teachers should stop padding Krakauer's wallet by making students read a book about a self-proclaimed "Supertramp" who was consumed by anger for his family, the government, and society in general. He got what he wanted all along : to be alone. What's to learn about a person who died over twenty-five years ago because he ate the wrong seeds? Other than what NOT to do--not much.

  • No, it was a needless death.

    No, Christopher McCandless should not be admired because he died needlessly. People should not be encouraged to do things that they are not trained to do. In McCandless case, his unwillingness to stay connected to the world ultimately cost him his life at a young age. People should be more cautious than that.

  • Admired for what?

    What kind of guy "tests" himself in the wilderness by camping in the luxury of a bus? A pathetic one. McCandless shouldn't be admired and his story shouldn't have made it to print or to the screen. What's the lesson here? Stay out of the Alaskan wilderness! Better yet, here's another: Teachers should stop padding Krakauer's wallet by making students read a book about a self-proclaimed "Supertramp" who was consumed by anger for his family, the government, and society in general. He got what he wanted all along : to be alone. What's to learn about a person who died over twenty-five years ago because he ate the wrong seeds? Other than what NOT to do--not much.

  • No, he was a crazy schizophrenic.

    He has somehow gained the attention of those who for whatever reason, that extremist libertarianism is divine. Hence, his quest for divine providence was righteous shot down by the intelligence of God and his omnipotent ability to thankfully control the outcome of lives. However this has the unfortunate effect of allowing the less educated pro-libertarians of this planet to have a 'martyr' to gather by.

  • He was not

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