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  • Colleges should be for free

    Some students are not able to study for the profession they want to work in because they can’t afford to go to college. Sometimes students can’t pay since they don't know how to handle money, The students also will have to pay their bill for the apartment, Taxes, They will have to pay for their food like dinner, They will have to pay for their clothes (etc). How will the students be able to pay for the college and for their own stuff? So why not have the colleges be for free so that they can learn about how to handle with money and also that they can do their own stuff. What if the students are poor? They would have to work part-time jobs just to earn money to pay for college. Then they might not focus so well. What if they don't have a family? Also
    If the colleges are for free there might be more students that will want to come and learn and they are able to come. Also students could make the government proud, And the students could make the country proud. By having more students there will be more higher educated in different professions.

  • No more debts

    College should be free because education is the major to having success or money in this society as of now . Having debts would make being successful harder and it would create money issues at an young age. You don't need to start off with debts no really wants to.

  • I would support a free public option.

    What I do not support is forcing private universities to drop their fees. I would support a public option in the form of either government-run free colleges or a voucher system. An educated society is nothing but beneficial for a nation. However, many countries that have all-out free college do not boast the best college educations. Competition must be allowed to exist in order to keep standards high. Lowering standards so everyone can have a free education is pointless. Offering a free college while still giving people the option to pay for private universities would keep competition high.

  • I Believe it should be, But our system won't stand for it.

    It is a basic human right to have access to utilities that will enable us to become the best possible person we can be. It give people the ability to think outside the box, to question life and to pursue the answers until they find it. It should not be a matter of money, but a matter of self growth.

    But our system won't allow for that. It's all about the rutherfords. Our system ensures that for a few to succeed, many must fail. Any part of our society and you will find that this is true, and it is for this reason that while I agree that Tertiary education should be free and open to all, It will never happen.

    It's a sad truth

  • Yes they should be

    College education should be free for everyone who chooses to dedicate themselves to their study. I think this is great for the development of any country intellectually, technologically, and scientifically. Who know how many bright minds out there aren't going to school simply because the priciness of it puts them off?

  • Yes, college educations should be free for everyone

    Yes, college educations should be free for everyone. Knowledge is power, and withholding that power from those who are unable to attend college with their own resources should be seen as a moral wrong. College isn't the end-all for education, and there is much else to learn outside of it, everyone should have the chance to attend an educational institution. While the institutions of education and academia are very flawed and biased toward those with better financial and social resources, everyone could benefit from extended learning in a classroom atmosphere.

  • Supply and demand says no.

    When the supply of a good is too high, demand will plummet. Scarcity gives a product more value, so making college education completely free leads to the labor market becoming oversaturated with workers with college degrees.

    What happens when you have more college degrees but the same amount of jobs available (or probably even less now that you've just killed entire industries by making them free)? Well, now Joe the Wal-mart exec doesn't have 50 applications anymore but 200, yet he still has the same amount of jobs open. So unemployment increases. By a lot. All the while, you've just graduated with the same degree that 50,000 other grads in the country, whereas if education wasn't free you'd only be competing with maybe 20,000. Good luck finding a job now!

    But even if we lived in a magical world where jobs were unlimited and bespectacled English boys went to wizard school, what happens to the quality of education in the country when you destroy competition between universities? It drops faster than your momma's knickers when she brings home a hot date on a Friday night. There's a reason why private American institutions such as Harvard and MIT dominate every worldwide university ranking and still do: its because it is a near-perfectly competitive industry, and competition begets innovation and better service.

    Bottom line is, if you want your college degrees served to you on a silver platter with no charge, head to Austira and Sweden, where the unemployment rate is 10% for the former and the labor participation rate has dropped to 40 year lows in the latter, not to mention their best universities look like community colleges compared to even American public universities.

  • Nothing is Free

    Nothing is free. Public school, water, police services all cost money. We pay for it through taxes. If college tuition was free for students, others in society would have to carry the burden of the costs. Others not receiving the benefits of the education will have to pay for those who will receive the benefits.

  • Governments can't afford that

    Local governments can not afford to send everyone to college. It would also make college too easy, and many would go just to spend more years in school when they would not get in otherwise. So no, college should only be for those that can afford it and can get in.


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