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Should mosquitoes really be eradicated? Or is that going too far?

Asked by: Taran966
  • They are literally more cons then pros to mosquitoes

    They are almost annoying in every way, Take your blood only to make more of the infamous vermin, Are like actual infected needles going from person to person transmitting disease and in some cases making new ones, And lastly the only food source they give is to dragon flies who would be the only ones affected by this change.

  • Yes Humans always make extinct the wrong ones

    Roaches, Mosquites, Most flies. RAts.
    Get rid of those carriers of plague and pests. There are some flies that are essential for flowers and other uses, But get rid of those.
    Other organisms can get rid of our waste and those things will kill you if you do not kill them first.
    Bats are very useful and so are other animals. The ones I mentioned have no place among us.

  • Mosquitoes are a living being. And making everything we hate extinct makes us no better than them, If not worse!

    Humans have made many things extinct, And to make mosquitoes extinct is yet another step in the wrong direction. We literally have evidence that there is ways to make mosquitoes grant immunity from certain diseases when they bite! And they do have a purpose, Believe it or not. Plants like orchids rely on mosquitoes to pollinate them! Certain creatures have mosquitoes and/or their larvae as a major food source. Their larvae are also pretty decent cleaners in water. And only the females bite for the pure purpose of making eggs from blood! Otherwise they’re nice little nectar drinking insects. Sure Malaria is a problem, But we can either find some sort of immunity or cure which can be given to mosquitoes which transmit it so they also give this to humans, Or the less friendly choice is, Unfortunately, To wipe out that entire exact species. But it’s best we go for fighting Malaria itself and make eradicating mosquitoes a last resort.


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