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Should the voting age stay at 18 and not be lowered?

  • U think the voting should stay the same

    The long debate over lowering the voting age in America from 21 to 18 began during World War II, and began becoming more intense during the Vietnam War. This all started with president Franklin D. Roosevelt. He said, “Old enough to fight, old enough to vote.” “The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.”

  • Adulthood Starts At Eighteen

    You shouldn't be able to vote until you are responsible enough and mature enough to take voting seriously. Adulthood begins at age eighteen NOT sixteen so why should we let these young teenagers get a say when it's an adult thing. Sorry my argument is so bad I'm only nine :)

  • Personally I thin no!

    It is just not right. They haven't become an official adult and haven't left school. However, the people who want it to be lowered I can see your point. Their brains are still developing and they may not be mature enough-some are though. Furthermore the older you are, the more wiser, mature and sensible you are.

  • Lowing the voting age would increase voter turnout.

    Recently, the voter turnout for people under 25 has not looked good. Turnout of American voters under 25 at presidential elections fell from 50% in 1972 to 38% in 2012; among over-65s it rose from 64% to 70%. For congressional races, the under-25 vote was a dire 17% in 2014. A similar pattern is repeated across the rich world. However, this could change if the voting age lowered. As 18 year olds are very busy in life, and have lots of things to do, they would not be willing to vote, and a habit of voting would not start. Plus, they see voting as a choice, not a privilege. Well, if the voting age is lowered, then the opportunity of voting, will be introduced to them when they have less to do, and therefore vote.

  • They are responsible

    The can drive so why can't they vote? Children's voice matters too, if kids are well educated, and are aware of each party's benefits and not just about one or two, then I believe that they should be able to vote. If they are responsible for their decision, I strongly think that anyone from ages 16 and on should have the right to vote.

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  • Because i said so

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  • Should voting be raised at the age of 18?

    Many Australian citizens argue that the age of voting should be raised to the age of 21. However other people argue that they should keep it at the age of 18. There are many reasons to keep it at the age of 18 because 18 year old's are very mature, they are legally an adult and giving 18 year old's the right to vote is enabling them to feel prepared for the real world and take an active role in society.

  • Should voting stay at the age of 18?

    Many Australian citizens argue that the age of voting should be raised to the age of 21. However other people argue that they should keep it at the age of 18. There are many reasons to keep it at the age of 18 because 18 year olds are very mature, they are legally an adult and giving 18 year olds the right to vote is enabling them to feel prepared for the real world and take an active role in society.

  • The reason why is because of your mom

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  • Voting age should not be lowered

    In general youths are not interested in political issues and if youth is not considered old enough to drink or go to nightclubs then how do you think that we can make such an important decision on how a country should run...So it is a bad idea to lower the voting age.

  • Just cuz no

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  • Far Too Young

    Everything should be left at 18.

    Voting
    Paying Taxes
    Leaving school
    Moving Out of Home - (unless abused and in the care/ or supervision of responsible adults)
    Joining the Army
    Driving
    Marrying
    Consent for sex - (or discriminating the adults at least for such atrocious behaviour)

    If 16/17 year olds have sex it should be in the privacy of their own rooms, with another teen close to their age - (ie - 1 or 2 years older) and with contraception.

    18/19 year-olds haven't much of an idea what being an adult is, due to being at the primary stage of their adult life, although they are at the beginning of this transformation and are mature enough to vote.

    16/17 year olds are still developing into adults.

    In some ways they are grown up, in a lot of other ways they are not.

    If 18/19 year olds struggle with the adult world, how are 16/17 year olds supposed to understand the world of adults and the responsibilities that come with it.

    Their skulls are still fusing and their brains are still developing. They shouldn't be boxing in the Olympics in a ring against 20 to 40 something's who should know better.

    A genuinely decent adult wouldn't go there in the real world so why allow such atrocities in the Olympics.

    Therefore why allow them to vote just because they are intelligent, interested in sex and more developed than younger boys and girls.

    They are still boys and girls themselves, just because they are older doesn't make them suddenly mature enough to do all the above.

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  • Not experienced yet

    For many years the voting age for Australia was 21 and only men could vote. Federal voting started in 1901 when Australia became a nation men over 21 could vote but indigenous people could not. But then in 1902 woman 21 or over could vote. Then in 1973 the voting age was reduced to 18 years
    One of the reasons I believe that it should remain at 18 because at the age of 16 people are not affected by some of the things of the laws government make and are probably would vote for whoever family or friends vote for. Also because it does not affect them many people will not vote and there many votes missing.
    Plus at the age of 18 you are able to enlist in the army so how come you are not a able to vote until 21 if the new law is passed?

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  • People under the age of 18 are affected by government decisions too

    Decisions made by the government effect the younger generation as well as the older generations. 16 years olds still have to face certain problems caused by the government such as education funding, public projects, taxes, and government spending. People under 18 are U.S citizens too and they should at least be able to vote as a citizen.

  • HABIT Taxation Without representation 16 year olds are stationary

    We have the responsibilities but not the rights. What kind of twisted message do you send when you tell Teens they are judged mature, responsible adults when they commit murder, but silly, brainless kids when they want to vote? Lowering the voting age is the just, fair way to set things straight.

    Like seriously with this one. I’m set for a job this summer that I would be making $2,100 from but will actually get 1,800. In fact, they pay a lot of taxes. Teens pay an estimated $9.7 Billion dollars in sales taxes alone. And we do work: 80% of high school students work at some point before graduation. We pay billions in taxes to state, local, and federal governments yet we have absolutely no say over how much is taken. Taxation without representation much. I’m not very good so I’m just going to quote 14-year-old Rebecca Tilsen had this to say: “If 16-year-olds are old enough to drink the water polluted by the industries that you regulate, if 16-year-olds are old enough to breathe the air ruined by garbage burners that government built, if 16-year-olds are old enough to walk on the streets made unsafe by terrible drugs and crime policies, if 16-year-olds are old enough to live in poverty in the richest country in the world, if 16-year-olds are old enough to get sick in a country with the worst public health-care programs in the world, and if 16-year-olds are old enough to attend school districts that you underfund, then 16-year-olds are old enough to play a part in making them better.”

    Teens feel alienated from politics and politicians, lowering the voting age will include them in the process. The words spoken before the Senate Judicary Committee supporting lowering the voting age in 1971 are as true then as they are now, “The anachronistic voting-age limitation tends to alienate them from systematic political processes and to drive them to into a search for an alternative, sometimes violent, means to express their frustrations over the gap between the nation’s deals and actions. Lowering the voting age will provide them with a direct, constructive and democratic channel for making their views felt and for giving them a responsible stake in the future of the nation.”
    CONTINUED

  • Yeah! Why not?

    Why can't the voting age be lowered? If 16 year old can be responsible enough to drive a car, why not vote? Its silly! 16 is when teens are in school, so they make smart decisions. They have teachers to ask. Come on! Cars = votes! Cars = votes! Cars = votes!


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JUSTYOUAVERAGETEEN says2015-05-28T22:24:20.577
It is silly to fear that huge masses of youth will rush to the voting booth and unwittingly vote for Mickey Mouse and Britney Spears. Those individuals with no interest in politics and no knowledge on the subject will stay home from the polls and not vote. This mechanism works for adult voters as well. We will behave no differently. Also With the voting age at 16 there is the opportunity for new voters to have a greater opportunity to be educated voters as most are in high school. When the voting age is lowered schools will most likely schedule a civics class to coincide with 16 that will introduce the issues and prepare new voters. It stands to reason that these we will be better prepared to vote than their elders.
JUSTYOUAVERAGETEEN says2015-05-28T22:25:26.337
We have the responibilities but not the rights.What kind of twisted message do you send when you tell Teens they are judged mature, responsible adults when they commit murder, but silly, brainless kids when they want to vote? Lowering the voting age is the just, fair way to set things straight.

LIke seriously with this one. I’m set for a job this summer that I woould be making $2,100 from but will actually get 1,800. In fact, they pay a lot of taxes. Teens pay an estimated $9.7 Billion dollars in sales taxes alone. And we do work: 80% of high school students work at some point before graduation. We pay billions in taxes to state, local, and federal governments yet we have absolutely no say over how much is taken. Taxation without representation much. I’m not very good so I’m just going to quote 14-year-old Rebecca Tilsen had this to say: “If 16-year-olds are old enough to drink the water polluted by the industries that you regulate, if 16-year-olds are old enough to breathe the air ruined by garbage burners that government built, if 16-year-olds are old enough to walk on the streets made unsafe by terrible drugs and crime policies, if 16-year-olds are old enough to live in poverty in the richest country in the world, if 16-year-olds are old enough to get sick in a country with the worst public health-care programs in the world, and if 16-year-olds are old enough to attend school districts that you underfund, then 16-year-olds are old enough to play a part in making them better.”

Teens feel alienated from politics and politicians, lowering the voting age will include them in the process. The words spoken before the Senate Judicary Committee supporting lowering the voting age in 1971 are as true then as they are now, “The anachronistic voting-age limitation tends to alienate them from systematic political processes and to drive them to into a search for an alternative, sometimes violent, means to express their frustrations over the gap between the nation’s deals and actions. Lowering the voting age will provide them with a direct, constructive and democratic channel for making their views felt and for giving them a responsible stake in the future of the nation.” 7


We have a unique perspective and we’ll only have it once. Denying youth the right to vote isn’t the same as denying women or racial minorities, according to opponents, since in a few years young people will grow up and be able to vote. People vote based on their individual circumstances, when those circumstances change often so do their voting habits. The concerns of a 14 year old are different than that of a 24 year old, just as the concerns of a poor man differ from that of a rich man. The beliefs and priorities of 16 year olds as a whole are unique to them; you cannot expect former 16 year olds to have as accurate a perspective as those who are currently that age. If you care at all about the needs and desires of youth, we must be allowed to vote for ourselves.

Currently the right to vote is granted at perhaps the worst possible moment in one’s life. At 18 many of us leave the home and community we have lived for most of our life, either to go away to college or to move away from home in search of work. Lowering the voting age to 16 will give the vote to people who have roots in a community, have an appreciation for local issues, and will be more concerned about voting than those just two years older. Lower the voting age, and teens will vote.


Lowering the voting age will increase voter turnout. It is common knowledge that the earlier in life a habit is formed the more likely that habit or interest will continue throughout life. If attempts are made to prevent young people from picking up bad habits, why are no attempts made to get youth started with good habits, like voting? If we begin voting earlier, and get into the habit of doing so earlier, we are more likely to stick with it through life.


The argument that teens “should not vote because they lack the ability to make informed and intelligent decisions is valid only if that standard is applied to all citizens.” But yet this standard is not applied to all citizens, only young people. “We do not deprive a senile person of this right, nor do we deprive any of the millions of alcoholics, neurotics, psychotics and assorted fanatics who live outside hospitals of it. We seldom ever prevent those who are hospitalized for mental illness from voting.” Furthermore, even the federal government agrees that most youth have the necessary knowledge to vote. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 states that: “any person who has not been adjudged an incompetent and who has completed the sixth grade in [. . .] any State or territory, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico where instruction is carried on predominantly in the English language, possesses sufficient literacy, comprehension, and intelligence to vote in any election.” If a Sixth grade education is deemed adequate knowledge to vote, how can older youth be denied the right to vote?
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