Confederate Flag Meaning (Please Read below)

Posted by: bettabreeder

Please comment Race and Poiltical Party

  • Heritage

  • Hate

54% 13 votes
46% 11 votes
  • I even know black people in the south that wave the confederate flag and don't have a problem with it. When you get to the root of it, it represents southern pride. Not racism. http://www.buzzle.com/articles/confederate-flag-meaning.html http://www.elon.edu/e-web/pendulum/Issues/2005/04_07/opinions/flag.xhtml

  • Honestly, the war was mainly over the government ruling the states (preferred by the north) or states rights ( preferred by the south) this flag represents standing out for your beliefs and not following the croud.

  • It's a flag that represents a territory that no longer exists -- nothing more. It's not even the ONLY flag Confederates fought under. It's mostly associated with the Army of Northern Virginia. There were about 40 flags carried by the Confederacy & around 30 carried by Union troops. The Betsy Ross flag, created in 1776, represents the colonies who fought in the American Revolution (not the entire U.S.). Those colonies were under the tyranny of the British Crown. The Brits carried the Union Jack. Do we consider the Union Jack a symbol of hatred & tyranny? No. Do we still fly the Betsy Ross flag? No. It has moved into history, but it is part of our heritage. The Union Jack is also part of our heritage & the Brits are one of our closest allies. The idea that the Stars & Bars flag is somehow a symbol of hatred is, at best, an overstatement. It is a flag that is part of America's history, whether you approve or not. It wasn't designed to represent hatred. It was designed to represent the states that seceded from the Union, for a short period of time & went to war. Nothing more.

  • Same thing with the swastika. They weren't made to define what we think of them as today.

  • Alright, I have German ancestry, so let me fly a Swastika to represent my heritage -_-

  • It represents racism (as an opponent of one of your debates pointed out)

    Posted by: SNP1
  • Heritage of slaves and bigotry.. Ya why this flag is allowed to be flown is beyond me..

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Comrade_Silly_Otter says2014-05-01T14:31:12.6050479-05:00
White, Democratic Socialist.
Muttl200 says2014-05-01T14:43:23.4237193-05:00
Grayish white, Moderate... I'm not touching this poll with a 10 foot stick.
FiggyCal says2014-05-01T14:57:49.7954479-05:00
I could've sworn we had a whole war about this issue. Something to do about slaves. I forget.
briantheliberal says2014-05-01T14:59:08.9529328-05:00
I love it how racists always try to make excuses for their hatred by claiming the Confederate flag is a representation of heritage instead of what it actually is, a symbol of hate, division and ignorance.
Owlz says2014-05-01T15:00:00.2147810-05:00
It means; "We are in the closet and we are overly defensive about that fact". ;P
SweetTea says2014-05-01T16:47:02.4194479-05:00
Briantheliberal said, "I love it how racists always try to make excuses for their hatred by claiming the Confederate flag is a representation of heritage instead of what it actually is, a symbol of hate, division and ignorance." Just out of curiosity ... Do you consider the Free Blacks who fought under the Confederate flag to be racists? Were they following a symbol of hate? Do you consider them ignorant? Or do you only reserve those derogatory remarks for Whites? Http://blackconfederates.Blogspot.Com/
SweetTea says2014-05-01T16:55:00.0134479-05:00
FYI ... http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mo/county/stlouis/blackcs.htm
briantheliberal says2014-05-01T17:22:14.3942479-05:00
SweetTea, "Do you consider the Free Blacks who fought under the Confederate flag to be racists? Were they following a symbol of hate? Do you consider them ignorant? Or do you only reserve those derogatory remarks for Whites?" Yes, yes and no because black people can be stupid, ignorant racists against their own race too. And not all blacks who fought for the Confederacy did so by their own free will.
thesouthwillrise says2014-05-01T20:01:51.5057137-05:00
Sweettea said free blacks.
Jifpop09 says2014-05-01T20:58:28.3526479-05:00
Sweettea, are you serious?
SweetTea says2014-05-02T03:57:28.2003409-05:00
Briantheliberal ... Obviously, not all Blacks who fought in the Civil War were Free Blacks. Duh! Some were slaves. If you watched the link that I provided, you heard a little about it. For example, in 1861, the largest plantation in Charleston, SC, was owned by a Free Black who also owned about 200 slaves. The political "spin", in the North, was to preserve the Union. When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, people rioted in NY. Obviously, they weren't too eager to die for slavery. In the South, the spin was about tyranny. Most of the American Revolution was fought in the South. So, the comparison was made quickly. Most Southerners didn't own slaves, so you couldn't convince them to fight & die for that cause. And the Top 1%, who were wealthy plantation owners, knew that. Hence, the spin. Slaves existed in the North, until just a few years before the war. Who do you think Northerners sold their slaves to? The South. They didn't just free them, hon. They sold them & turned a profit. Yet, they wanted the South to end slavery quickly -- take a financial loss if necessary. If you ask a wealthy, Black man today to take a huge investment loss, he'll most likely tell you to go to h*ll! Any investor would! So, Free Blacks (who owned slaves) were as much against the idea as wealthy Whites. There were a lot of dynamics involved in the Civil War -- not just slavery. For example, in 1861, cotton was the biggest economic market in the country. Where was the cotton? In the South. The industrialized North had sold their slaves & abolished Black slavery. Yet, they were still operating with child slave labor & indentured servants. Lincoln's own mother (Nancy Hanks) had been an indentured servant. Did you know that? Slavery, in America, wasn't exclusive to one race. Even when the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, it failed to end child slave labor. Why? The North needed it. The South was predominantly dependent upon Black slaves. After the Civil War, the Industrialized North took economic dominance. In fact, in 1900, there was an estimated 2 million child slave laborers in this country. These children were kept locked-up ... Forced to work ... Barely fed, etc. They suffered horrible disfigurements -- even death -- because of the work they did. Laws, in the last 100 years, have helped to eliminate this form of abuse. Unfortunately, in 2014, it still exists elsewhere, i.e. the Chocolate industry (no joke). Greed & money make people do really strange things -- even fight wars & enslave human beings. I don't care how old you are, or the color of your skin, slavery is wrong. In America, it didn't end in 1865. Nor was it exclusive to the South, or one race. The more you study it, the more variables you find. If human rights were the sole concern, children wouldn't have been conveniently left out of the equation. As I stated before, greed & money make people do really strange things!
FiggyCal says2014-05-02T12:41:56.4532339-05:00
SweetTea, I don't understand the point you're trying to make. You're saying: "Slavery existed in the north and slavery still exists today, therefore the confederate flag isn't a symbol of racism." The argument here isn't that child labor is good or that slavery doesn't still exist in some form. People are saying that the confederate flag is a symbol of racism and of a group of people that fought in favor of slavery. The child labor laws and illegal workers in the U.S., or whatever you want to classify as slavery has nothing to do with the context of the confederate flag. No one in New York is proudly waving a flag that celebrates their culture of child labor. No one in Germany is waving a flag of a swastika that celebrates their culture of Nazism. Why is the South allowed to wave a flag that celebrates their stance on slavery. You're also ignoring the lynchings of black men and women in confederate states after slavery had ended, well into the 20th century. You're ignoring that the KKK was founded by confederate army soldiers. You're ignoring that racists still to this day themselves cling on to the confederate flag as an embodiment of their beliefs. We can go into reasons why the south fought for their right to own slaves (it was the main reason why the civil war happened and any attempt to skew that is immoral and an injustice to history). Yes, it made strong economic sense for the South that depended so much on cotton and tobacco, but the fact of the matter is that confederate flag is all about slavery and racism. Any pride you put into that history is up to you.
SweetTea says2014-05-03T08:18:25.6638199-05:00
Fig ... The Confederate flag is just a flag. If something is a symbol of "hatred" it must be designed for that purpose, or embraced by a group for such intention. The Confederate flag shown above, which is actually the battle-flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, was designed to represent a territory that does not exist anymore. It was not designed as a symbol of hatred. It's just a flag. Its usefulness fell into the history books, in 1865. But even when it was used, it was carried by the Free Blacks & Whites who fought for the "tyranny" they objected to. I realize slaves also fought for the Confederacy, but they had no "free choice" in doing so. The Civil War was initially fought because the South seceded & the North was trying to "preserve the Union". The South objected to the North's meddling of what was their largest economic market -- cotton. Slavery was a secondary issue. When it was publicly added to the mix (Emancipation Proclamation), there were strong objects in the North (rioting). Today, we see slavery for the human rights abuse that it was & still is. But in the 1800's, slaves were an investment (owned by Free Blacks & Whites). We cannot make history into what we want it to be. We can't say something is a symbol of hatred, when it was never designed as such. Since the Civil War ... Slavery continued (with children) in the industrialized North till legislation in the 1930's. The KKK was founded in the South & has had far more members who weren't Confederate soldiers than those who served (the KKK also exists outside the South). The most commonly used symbol by the KKK is a burning cross -- not the confederate flag. Should we declare a Christian cross to be a symbol of racism? I'm betting every Black, Christian church in America has at least one hanging inside it. While lynching occurred of Black men & women, I will remind you that Whites during the Civil Rights era were beaten & killed (including a Jew & a Catholic priest) trying to gain equality for Blacks. Racism exists in every corner of the world. It exists among minorities. Hatred will always exist. If you want to get technical, the KKK marches with an American flag as well as a Confederate flag. More hate groups embrace the American flag than the Confederate flag, overall. Does that make the American flag a symbol of racism & hatred? The flag above, like many flags, was not designed as a symbol of hatred or racism. Both were designed to represent territories. When a hate group, today, embraces either one that is their choice -- but not the initial design of the flag.
Jifpop09 says2014-05-05T16:57:51.3008008-05:00
SweetTea, your logic was terrible. The British union jack didn't stand for an evil nation like the confederates did. The acts that the south engaged in were incomprehensible. Throwing away all humane laws we had in protection of slaves. It makes me want to puke that people still fly such a $hitty flag.
bettabreeder says2014-05-05T18:16:43.5538732-05:00
Sweettea is 100% correct free and slaved bared armed in the Confederate army
yetifivepecks says2014-05-26T13:42:23.6086934-05:00
Human...Oh, you mean skin pigment. That seems petty. I'm Irish/English/Blackfoot/Cherokee/Dutch/Swedish, and a Libertarian Socialist.

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