Did you know Mississippi only abolished slavery in 2013?

Posted by: tajshar2k

  • Yes

  • No

27% 4 votes
73% 11 votes
  • Everyone knows that. It was in the news in January 2013 I think.

  • This is both true AND false at the same time. During the ratification process of the 13th Amendment, Mississippi was a holdout as they appealed the decision to not compensate people for the loss of their slaves. The Amendment was obviously ratified and placed into the Bill of Rights making it so no laws could be created to undermine it. Due to so much change occurring which required congressional oversight, Mississippi forgot to sign the forms and get them mailed in. Two people found the oversight a few years ago and Mississippi signed the papers then sent them in. ***Note: States only have a limited time to send in the paperwork so technically they still have not agreed to the Ratification as the time limit has expired.*** So yes they symbolically signed it recently, however, they are still documented as a party voting "Nay" for the ratification of proposed Amendment 13.

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TBR says2015-07-18T12:43:17.0160504-05:00
Its Mississippi. What would you expect?
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T12:47:32.4945388-05:00
I don't get the joke...
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T12:49:35.0047544-05:00
Were there really slaves before 2013?
58539672 says2015-07-18T13:28:55.5311083-05:00
@triangle.128k Their were no slaves in Mississippi after the civil war. What tajshar2k is talking about is that Mississippi didn't submit the required forms ratifying the 13th amendment until 2013. So technically they were still a slave state, but thanks to the Emancipation Proclamation their were no slaves.
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T13:53:28.6370108-05:00
That explains it.
TBR says2015-07-18T14:31:10.4952363-05:00
Its even a little weirder than that. They DID something in the mid 90's, I would have to look it up, where they ATTEMPTED to fix this "paperwork" issue, and people actually voted it down. I may be wrong on the details, but I know it came up before, and was "blocked".
58539672 says2015-07-18T14:58:36.9810589-05:00
At the worst, Mississippi was a slave state with no slaves.
TBR says2015-07-18T15:01:43.4816852-05:00
I found the info. "Mississippi voted to ratify the amendment in 1995 but failed to make it official by notifying the U.S. Archivist". So... It was 1995, good for them.
TBR says2015-07-18T15:03:42.9457194-05:00
@58539672 - Can you find a good reason they did NOT ratify it for the 140 years BEFORE? It is a problem, it is a south problem, it is a racism problem. We can 'play nice' all we like, but it is a very backwards state.
58539672 says2015-07-18T15:06:34.6352485-05:00
@TBR Never said it wasn't.
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T15:08:44.6173944-05:00
@TBR It's pretty ironic how racism is more of an issue in the southeast, but the southeast in general is more ethnically diverse than the northeast.
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T15:08:50.0558787-05:00
https://marketmaps.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/diversity-map.gif
58539672 says2015-07-18T15:12:22.0515882-05:00
@triangle.128k Its not really that surprising actually. More homogenous areas tend to have fewer racial and ethnical problems.
TBR says2015-07-18T15:28:12.5921767-05:00
When I was living in CA, I virtually never saw black people. I think there was one guy living in my town. When I got back to the Chicago area, it was nice to have the mix back. Point is... Well no point really. Just an observation.
tajshar2k says2015-07-18T15:42:45.0698260-05:00
Look it up. It's true.
triangle.128k says2015-07-18T17:58:54.1623031-05:00
@TBR That's pretty odd, California has one of the highest diversity rates in the US.
TBR says2015-07-18T21:21:33.9100549-05:00
@triangle.128k - I 1) don't know that to be true. 2) Think regardless it is highly geographic. I was floored by the lack of diversity. The "day without a immigrant" was invisible to me.

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