Vote
11 Total Votes
1

No, its a great tool for good.

5 votes
0 comments
2

Yes, it is an extension of eugenics and kills embryos in it's very reserch.

3 votes
0 comments
3

No. It's the most facile, modular and effective means for altering genetic code.

2 votes
1 comment
4

Yes, it's a creepy weapon of mass destruction

1 vote
0 comments
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subdeo says2017-08-09T17:31:58.5234434Z
I did not realize that picture was entirely unrelated. Whoops!
Ailly0-9 says2017-08-09T19:04:33.6222159Z
No
whiteflame says2017-08-10T02:56:29.7073173Z
Can someone please explain to me why they feel that CRISPR technology is dangerous or concerning? I'm honestly uncertain where the perceived harm is.
DrCereal says2017-08-10T17:03:31.1731722Z
@white I bet -- though I'm not sure -- that people are afraid of the idea of "designer babies" or the common argument that we will "play god" by using these tools.
whiteflame says2017-08-10T22:52:56.3933386Z
I kind of get that, though I have two problems with that. First, it doesn't explain why CRISPR is, itself, scary. It's a technique, and while it might allow some morally questionable science to take place, that's true of practically every technique imaginable. CRISPR isn't suddenly making designer babies a reality, any more than zinc fingers or TALENs have. Second, I'm not really sure why we should fear designer babies. There's some moral questions involved in genetically altering our offspring, but I don't see them as any more problematic than any of the other means we use to "design" our children. Being able to do so on an individual gene level may upset some people, but I just don't see how that's more disquieting than, say, in vitro selection or genetic screening. Maybe some people find those problematic as well, but that means CRISPR isn't breaking new ground in their minds.

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