Favorite hoax?

Posted by: PetersSmith

I was going to rethink making this poll considering how many I would miss, but when that happened I was already at option 40 so I figured I might as well keep going.

Vote
9 Total Votes
1

Other

There's over 100 so I sacrificed the many to save the few. For once I actually won't be unhappy if you vote for this option considering the nature of this poll.
4 votes
4 comments
2

Tourist guy

The "tourist guy" was an Internet phenomenon that featured a fake photograph of a tourist who appeared in many manipulated pictures after the September 11 attacks. It was proven to have been taken in 1997.He is also called numerous other names, incl... uding the "accidental tourist", "Waldo", the "WTC Guy," and the "tourist of death.   more
1 vote
0 comments
3

Piltdown Man

The Piltdown Man was a paleoanthropological hoax in which bone fragments were presented as the fossilised remains of a previously unknown early human. These fragments consisted of parts of a skull and jawbone, said to have been collected in 1912 fro... m a gravel pit at Piltdown, East Sussex, England. The Latin name Eoanthropus dawsoni was given to the specimen. The significance of the specimen remained the subject of controversy until it was exposed in 1953 as a forgery, consisting of the lower jawbone of an orangutan deliberately combined with the cranium of a fully developed modern human.The Piltdown hoax is perhaps the most famous paleoanthropological hoax ever to have been perpetrated. It is prominent for two reasons: the attention paid to the issue of human evolution, and the length of time that elapsed from its discovery to its full exposure as a forgery   more
1 vote
0 comments
4

Pacific Northwest tree octopus

The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is an Internet hoax created in 1998 by Lyle Zapato. This fictitious endangered species of cephalopod was given the Latin name "Octopus paxarbolis". It was purported to be able to live both on land and in water, and...  was said to live in the Olympic National Forest and nearby rivers, spawning in water where its eggs are laid. Its major predator was said to be the Sasquatch.The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus website is among a number of sites commonly used in Internet literacy classes in schools, although it was not created for that purpose. Despite the falsehoods shown on the site, such as the inclusion of other hoax species and organizations, all 25 seventh-grade students involved in one well-publicized test believed the content   more
1 vote
0 comments
5

Balloon boy hoax

The balloon boy hoax occurred on October 15, 2009 in Fort Collins, Colorado, United States when Richard and Mayumi Heene allowed a gas balloon filled with helium to float away into the atmosphere, and then claimed that their six-year-old son Falcon ... was inside it. At the time, it was reported by the mass media that the boy was apparently traveling at altitudes reaching 7,000 feet in a homemade balloon colored and shaped to resemble a silver flying saucer-type of UFO. The event attracted worldwide attention. Falcon was nicknamed "Balloon Boy" by some in the media.After more than an hour-long flight that covered more than 50 miles across three counties, the balloon landed about 12 miles northeast of Denver International Airport. Authorities closed down the Denver airport and sent several National Guard helicopters and local police in pursuit. After the balloon landed and the boy was found not to be inside, authorities began a manhunt of the entire area, raising fears that he had fallen from the balloon; it was reported that an object had detached from the balloon and fallen to the ground   more
1 vote
0 comments
6

Hitler Diaries

In April 1983, the West German news magazine Stern published excerpts from what purported to be the diaries of Adolf Hitler, known as the Hitler Diaries, which were subsequently revealed to be forgeries. The magazine had paid nearly 9 million German...  marks for the sixty small books, plus a "special volume" about Rudolf Hess's flight to the United Kingdom, covering the period from 1932 to 1945. In April 2013 Stern publisher Gruner + Jahr donated 58 volumes to the German Federal Archive in Coblenz. The House of the History of the Federal Republic in Bonn and the Police Museum in Hamburg received one volume each. The final volume had been auctioned off in Berlin to an anonymous buyer, who paid 6,500 euros for it in April 2004   more
1 vote
0 comments
7

Essjay controversy

The Essjay controversy was an incident concerning a prominent Wikipedia participant and salaried Wikia employee, known by the username Essjay, who later identified himself as Ryan Jordan. Jordan held trusted volunteer positions within Wikipedia know... n as "administrator", "bureaucrat", "arbitrator", and "mediator".On July 24, 2006, a user named Daniel Brandt started a thread titled "Who is Essjay?" on the forum site Wikipedia Review. The ensuing discussion brought to light contradictions in claims Essjay made about his academic qualifications and professional experiences on his Wikipedia user page. Yet, five days later, The New Yorker published an interview with Essjay which repeated some of the claims. Wikipedia Review found definitive proof that Jordan made false claims about his qualifications and experience, including that he was a "tenured professor", a claim that was used to describe Essjay in the interview for The New Yorker. In January 2007, Daniel Brandt contacted the author of the article in The New Yorker about the discrepancies in Jordan's biography and the exploitation of his supposed qualifications as leverage in internal disputes over Wikipedia content   more
0 votes
0 comments
8

Crop circles

A crop circle is a sizable pattern created by the flattening of a crop such as wheat, barley, rye, maize, or rapeseed. Crop circles are also referred to as crop formations because they are not always circular in shape. The documented cases have subs... tantially increased from the 1970s to current times, and many self-styled experts allege an alien origin. However, in 1991, two hoaxers, Bower and Chorley, claimed authorship of many circles throughout England after one of their circles was certified as impossible to be made by a man by a notable circle investigator in front of journalists.Circles in the United Kingdom are not spread randomly across the landscape, but they appear near roads, areas of medium to dense population, and cultural heritage monuments, such as Stonehenge or Avebury, and always in areas of easy access. Archeological remains can cause cropmarks in the fields in the shapes of circles and squares, but they do not appear overnight, and they are always in the same places every year.The scientific consensus is that most or all crop circles are man-made, with a few possible exceptions due to meteorological or other natural phenomena   more
0 votes
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9

Fiji mermaid

The Fiji mermaid was an object comprising the torso and head of a juvenile monkey sewn to the back half of a fish. It was a common feature of sideshows, where it was presented as the mummified body of a creature that was supposedly half mammal and h... alf fish, a version of a mermaid. The original object was exhibited by P. T. Barnum from 1842 until the 1860s when it was destroyed in a fire. The original had fish scales with animal hair superimposed on its body with pendulous breasts on its chest. The mouth was wide open with its teeth bared. The right hand was against the right cheek, and the left tucked under its lower left jaw. Several replicas and variations have also been made and exhibited under similar names and pretexts   more
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10

Maggie Murphy hoax

The Maggie Murphy hoax was a hoax perpetuated in 1895 by W. L. Thorndyke. He created an image that depicted farmer Joseph B. Swan holding what appeared to be a giant potato. The photo rapidly spread around the United States, and appeared in a panel ... of Ripley's Believe It or Not!   more
0 votes
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11

Time travel urban legends

Time travel urban legends are accounts of persons who allegedly traveled through time, reported by the press or circulated on the Internet. All of these reports have turned out either to be hoaxes or to be based on incorrect assumptions, incomplete ... information, or interpretation of fiction as fact   more
0 votes
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12

Document 12-571-3570

Document 12-571-3570 is a hoax document originally posted to the Usenet newsgroup alt.Sex on November 28, 1989. According to this document, astronauts aboard space shuttle mission STS-75 performed a variety of sex acts to determine which positions a... re most effective in zero gravity. The document goes on to report that of the 10 positions tested, six required the use of a belt and an inflatable tunnel, while four were contingent on hanging on. The document also discusses a video record of the 10 one-hour sessions in the lower deck of the shuttle, and notes that the subjects added their own personal footnotes to help scientists.Given that the real STS-75 mission occurred in 1996, 7 years after the text was published, the document is obviously fictional. The descriptions of heterosexual intercourse are further evidence that it is a hoax, as there were no women aboard STS-75. Nonetheless, many people have been fooled by this document and NASA has had to debunk it on several occasions. In March 2000, NASA's director of media services Brian Welch referred to the document as a "fairly well-known 'urban legend'"   more
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13

Ern Malley

Ernest Lalor "Ern" Malley was a fictitious poet and the central figure in Australia's most celebrated literary hoax. He and his entire body of work were created in one day in 1943 by writers James McAuley and Harold Stewart in order to hoax Max Harr... is and Angry Penguins, the modernist magazine Harris had founded and edited, and now co-edited with John Reed of Heide.In the decades after their publication, the hoax had a negative effect on the cause of modernist poetry in Australia. Since the 1970s, however, the Ern Malley poems, though known to be a hoax, became celebrated as a successful example of surrealist poetry in their own right, lauded by poets and critics such as John Ashbery and Robert Hughes   more
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14

Emulex hoax

The Emulex hoax, an instance of securities fraud, was a false 2000-08-24 press release claiming to be from Emulex Corporation. The release falsely claimed that the company's CEO was stepping down, that previously stated quarterly earnings were being...  revised downward, and that the company was under investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.The next morning, on 2000-08-25, the false release was picked up by Bloomberg Television and other news outlets. Emulex's stock price dropped from $103.94 to $43.00 in 16 minutes of morning trading, losing $2.2 billion in market capitalization, before Nasdaq halted trading on the stock.It was soon learned that the press release was a fraudulent short and distort stock manipulation. However, the discovery was not instantaneous, because Emulex is headquartered in California, three hours behind the east coast. The US stock markets opened at 9:30 AM Eastern time, which was 6:30 AM in California, and no one was at the Emulex office to field calls from the press.The fraudulent press release came from a press service named Internet Wire   more
0 votes
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15

Disappearing blonde gene

The disappearing blonde gene refers to false reports that a scientific study had estimated that natural blonds would become extinct, which were reported as fact in reputable media such as the BBC and the Sunday Times between 2002 and 2006. Claims th... at blond hair would disappear have been made since 1865. According to the erroneous reports, the World Health Organization, or other experts, published a report claiming that people with blond hair "will become extinct by 2202".The story about the report was a hoax—neither the WHO nor any reputable expert has issued such a report. Those who commented on this alleged report were asked by the WHO to retract.The extinction claim is based on a misinterpretation of recessiveness in genetics. In reality, unless blond genes are positively selected against, blondeness will not disappear   more
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16

Jacko hoax

The Jacko hoax was a Canadian newspaper story about a gorilla supposedly caught near Yale, British Columbia in 1884. The story, titled "What is it?, A strange creature captured above Yale. A British Columbia Gorilla", appeared in the British Columbi... a newspaper the Daily Colonist on July 4, 1884. On July 9, 1884, the Mainland Guardian newspaper in New Westminster, British Columbia stated "that no such animal was caught, and how the Colonist was duped in such a manner, and by such a story, is strange." On July 11, 1884, the newspaper British Columbian reported that about 200 people went to view "Jacko" at the jail where he was supposedly kept, but the people found only a man at the jail who fielded questions about a creature that did not exist.The "Jacko" story has been used by Bigfoot advocates as evidence for the existence of Sasquatch. The original newspaper article describes "Jacko" as a gorilla and not a Sasquatch. Many books about Bigfoot and cryptids have featured the event and cite the original newspaper article. In 2008 Michael Cremo discussed the story as possible proof for the existence of Sasquatch   more
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17

Donation of Constantine

The Donation of Constantine is a forged Roman imperial decree by which the emperor Constantine I supposedly transferred authority over Rome and the western part of the Roman Empire to the Pope. Composed probably in the 8th century, it was used, espe... cially in the 13th century, in support of claims of political authority by the papacy. Lorenzo Valla, an Italian Catholic priest and Renaissance humanist, is credited with first exposing the forgery with solid philological arguments in 1439–1440, although the document's authenticity had been repeatedly contested since 1001.In many manuscripts, including the oldest one, the document bears the title Constitutum domini Constantini imperatoris   more
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18

Fur-bearing trout

The fur-bearing trout is a fictional creature purportedly found in North America and Iceland. According to tales, the trout has evolved a thick coat of fur to maintain its body heat. Tales of furry fish date to the 17th-century and later the "shaggy...  trout" of Iceland. The earliest known American publication dates from a 1929 Montana Wildlife magazine article by J.H. Hicken. A taxidermy furry trout produced by Ross C. Jobe is a specimen at the Royal Museum of Scotland, it is a trout with white rabbit fur "ingeniously" attached. There are no real examples of any fur-bearing trout species, but two examples of hair-like growths on fish are known. The "cotton mold", Saprolegnia, can infect fish, which can result in the appearance of fish covered in the white "fur". A real fish, Mirapinna esau, also known as the "Hairy Fish", has hair-like outgrowths and wings   more
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19

Gundala

Gundala the movie was a hoax perpetrated by Iskandar Salim, a photographer and graphic designer who created promotional material for a movie that was not actually being made about Gundala, a lightning powered superhero. Salim noticed that there had ... never been a movie featuring an Indonesian superhero and wished to start a public debate on the subject. He created an official website, a Facebook page, posters, and staged photographs that allegedly showed the movie being made. As a result of the attention generated by the hoax, Gundala's creator, Harya Hasmi is actually involved in negotiations to produce a real film based on the character   more
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20

Jdbgmgr.Exe virus hoax

The jdbgmgr.Exe virus hoax involved an e-mail spam in 2002 that advised computer users to delete a file named jdbgmgr.Exe because it was a computer virus. Jdbgmgr.Exe, which had a little teddy bear-like icon, was actually a valid Microsoft Windows f... ile, the Debugger Registrar for Java.The email has taken many forms, including saying its purpose was to warn Hotmail users of a virus spreading via MSN Messenger, or to alert about a possible virus in the orkut web community. The message went on to say that it was not detected by McAfee or Norton AntiVirus, which was obviously true. A further variant related the file with the "Bugbear" virus, which was a genuine virus, prevalent at the time.The effect of deleting the file was restricted to Java developers who used Microsoft Visual J++ v1.1   more
0 votes
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21

Great Stock Exchange Fraud of 1814

The Great Stock Exchange Fraud of 1814 was a hoax or fraud centered on false information about the Napoleonic Wars, affecting the London Stock Exchange in 1814.
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22

Sidd Finch

Sidd Finch was a fictional baseball player, the subject of the notorious article and April Fools' Day hoax "The Curious Case of Sidd Finch" written by George Plimpton and first published in the April 1, 1985 issue of Sports Illustrated. According to...  Plimpton, Finch was raised in an English orphanage, learned yoga in Tibet, and could throw a fastball as fast as 168 miles per hour   more
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23

Priory of Sion

The Prieuré de Sion, translated from French as Priory of Sion, is a name given to multiple groups, both real and fictitious. The most controversial is a fringe fraternal organisation, founded and dissolved in France in 1956 by Pierre Plantard. In th... e 1960s, Plantard created a fictitious history for that organization, describing it as a secret society founded by Godfrey of Bouillon on Mount Zion in the Kingdom of Jerusalem in 1099, conflating it with a genuine historical monastic order, the Abbey of Our Lady of Mount Zion. In Plantard's version, the priory was devoted to installing a secret bloodline of the Merovingian dynasty on the thrones of France and the rest of Europe. This myth was expanded upon and popularised by the 1982 pseudohistorical book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail and later claimed as factual in the preface of the 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code.After becoming a cause célèbre from the late 1960s to the 1980s, the mythical Priory of Sion was exposed as a ludibrium created by Plantard as a framework for his claim of being the Great Monarch prophesied by Nostradamus   more
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24

Project Alpha

Project Alpha was an elaborate hoax that began in 1979 and ended with its disclosure in 1981. It was orchestrated by the stage magician and skeptic James Randi. It involved planting two fake psychics, Steve Shaw and Michael Edwards, into a paranorma... l research project. During the initial stages of the investigation, the researchers came to believe that the pair's psychic powers were real. However, more formal experiments, as well as criticism from both the parapsychology community and Randi himself, led them to dismiss their initial trust. The hoax was later revealed publicly.Following Project Alpha, Randi went on to use variations of the technique on several other occasions. Perhaps the most famous example led to the downfall of TV evangelist and faith healer Peter Popoff, when Randi had a man pose as a woman with uterine cancer, which Popoff happily "cured". In another example, Randi worked with performance artist José Alvarez, who posed as a channeller known as "Carlos", who was presented on Australian TV and soon had a wide following   more
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25

The Amityville Horror

Ghostly events reported by the buyers of a house where another family had been murdered.
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26

Microsoft hoax

The original Microsoft hoax was a bogus 1994 press release suggesting that the information technology company Microsoft had acquired the Roman Catholic Church. It is considered to be the first Internet hoax to reach a mass audience.
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27

Toothing

Toothing was originally a hoax claim that Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones or PDAs were being used to arrange random sexual encounters, perpetrated as a prank on the media who reported it. The hoax was created by Ste Curran, then Editor at Large at t... he gaming magazine Edge, and ex-journalist Simon Byron. They based it on the two concepts dogging and bluejacking that were popular at the time. The creators started a forum in March 2004 where they wrote fake news articles about toothing with other members and then sent them off to well-known Internet-based news services. The point of the hoax was to "highlight how journalists are happy to believe something is true without necessarily checking the facts". Dozens of news organizations, including BBC News, Wired News, and The Independent thought the toothing story was real and printed it. On April 4, 2005, Curran and Byron admitted that the whole thing was a hoax. There have, however, been real Bluetooth dating devices to hit the market since   more
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28

Paul is dead

"Paul is dead" is an urban legend and conspiracy theory suggesting that Paul McCartney of the English rock band the Beatles died in 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike.In September 1969, American college students published articles claimi... ng that clues to McCartney's supposed death could be found among the lyrics and artwork of the Beatles' recordings. Clue-hunting proved infectious and within a few weeks had become an international phenomenon. Rumours declined after a contemporary interview with McCartney was published in Life magazine in November 1969.Popular culture continues to make occasional reference to the legend, and McCartney poked fun at it with a 1993 live album titled Paul Is Live, whose cover parodied "clues" allegedly on the cover of the Beatles' Abbey Road album   more
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29

Dihydrogen monoxide hoax

The dihydrogen monoxide hoax involves calling water by the unfamiliar chemical name "dihydrogen monoxide", and listing some of water's effects in an alarming manner, such as the fact that it accelerates corrosion and can cause severe burns. The hoax...  often calls for dihydrogen monoxide to be regulated, labeled as hazardous, or banned. It illustrates how the lack of scientific literacy and an exaggerated analysis can lead to misplaced fears.The hoax gained renewed popularity in the late 1990s when a 14-year-old student collected anti-DHMO petitions for a science project about gullibility. The story has since been used in science education to encourage critical thinking   more
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30

Tuxissa

Tuxissa is a fictional computer virus hoax made up by Humorix, a humor website on Linux.Although the website states that all articles there are fake, anti-virus software makers such as Symantec, Sophos and F-Secure had pages for the Tuxissa virus ho... ax   more
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31

Zzxjoanw

Zzxjoanw is a famous fictitious entry which fooled logologists for many years. In 1903, author Rupert Hughes published The Musical Guide, an encyclopedia of classical music. Among the many sections of the "Guide" was a "pronouncing and defining dict... ionary of terms, instruments, etc". The "dictionary" occupied 252 pages, explaining the meanings and pronunciations of the German, Italian and other non-English words found in the terminology of classical music. As the very end of the dictionary, immediately after an entry for "zymbel", Hughes added the following definition:The entry was retained when the book was republished under different titles in 1912 and 1939.According to Dmitri Borgmann's 1965 book Language on Vacation: An Olio of Orthographical Oddities, printed before it was revealed as a hoax:"The Music Lovers' Encyclopedia, compiled by Rupert Hughes, revised by Deems Taylor and Russell Kerr, and published in 1954, presents us with one of the most unbelievable, one of the most intriguing letter combinations ever to claim recognition as a word: ZZXJOANW   more
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32

Bananadine

Bananadine is a fictional psychoactive substance which is supposedly extracted from banana peels. A hoax recipe for its "extraction" from banana peel was originally published in the Berkeley Barb in March 1967. It became more widely known when Willi... am Powell, believing it to be true, reproduced the method in The Anarchist Cookbook in 1970 under the name "Musa sapientum Bananadine". The original hoax was designed to raise questions about the ethics of making psychoactive drugs illegal and prosecuting those who took them: "what if the common banana contained psychoactive properties, how would the government react?" One book of one-liner joke comics, published in 1971, contained a comic in which a teen is secretly handing bunches of bananas to a zoo gorilla at night, uttering the line "Just throw the skins back, man!"Researchers at New York University have found that banana peel contains no intoxicating chemicals, and that smoking it produces only a placebo effect. Over the years, there has been considerable speculation regarding the psychoactive properties of banana skins   more
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33

Bathtub hoax

The bathtub hoax was a famous hoax perpetrated by the American journalist H. L. Mencken involving the publication of a fictitious history of the bathtub.
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34

Beringer's Lying Stones

Beringer's Lying Stones are pieces of limestone carved into the shape of various animals, discovered in 1725 by Professor Johann Bartholomeus Adam Beringer, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Würzburg. Beringer believed them to be ... fossils, and because some of them also bore the name of God in Hebrew, suggested that they might be of divine origin. In fact, he was the victim of a hoax, perpetrated on him by his colleagues ex-Jesuit J. Ignatz Roderick, Professor of Geography and Mathematics, and Johann Georg von Eckhart, privy counselor and university librarian. Upon discovering the truth, Beringer took his hoaxers to court, and the scandal that followed left all three of them in disgrace.Some of the stones are now on display at the Oxford University Museum, and Teylers Museum in the Netherlands   more
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35

Berners Street hoax

The Berners Street hoax was perpetrated by Theodore Hook in the City of Westminster, London, in 1810. Hook had made a bet with his friend, Samuel Beazley, that he could transform any house in London into the most talked-about address in a week, whic... h he achieved by sending out thousands of letters in the name of Mrs Tottenham, who lived at 54 Berners Street, requesting deliveries, visitors, and assistance.On 27 November, at five o’clock in the morning, a sweep arrived to sweep the chimneys of Mrs Tottenham's house. The maid who answered the door informed him that no sweep had been requested, and that his services were not required. A few moments later another sweep presented himself, then another, and another, 12 in all. After the last of the sweeps had been sent away, a fleet of carts carrying large deliveries of coal began to arrive, followed by a series of cakemakers delivering large wedding cakes, then doctors, lawyers, vicars and priests summoned to minister to someone in the house they had been told was dying. Fishmongers, shoemakers, and over a dozen pianos were among the next to appear, along with "six stout men bearing an organ"   more
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36

Franz Bibfeldt

Franz Bibfeldt is a fictitious theologian and in-joke among American academic theologians.Bibfeldt made his first appearance as the author of an invented footnote in a term paper of a Concordia Seminary student, Robert Howard Clausen. Clausen's clas... smate, Martin Marty, was struck by the name and Bibfeldt became a running joke for Martin and his friends. In 1951, Marty's review of Bibfeldt's The Relieved Paradox was published in the Concordia Seminarian, to the bewilderment of the Concordia faculty. When the ruse was uncovered, Marty's fellowship to study overseas was revoked, and he instead enrolled in the University of Chicago, where he spent the rest of his academic career; he thus credits Bibfeldt as the German theologian who had the greatest influence on his work.Since then Bibfeldt scholarship has greatly expanded, though the preponderance of work has come out of the University of Chicago, where there is a Donnelley Stool of Bibfeldt Studies   more
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37

The Big Donor Show

De Grote Donorshow was a hoax reality television program which was broadcast in the Netherlands on Friday, June 1, 2007, by BNN. The program involved a supposedly terminally ill 37-year-old woman donating a kidney to one of twenty-five people requir... ing a kidney transplantation. After a first selection, three people remained. Viewers were able to send advice on whom they thought she should choose to give her kidney to via text messages. The profit made by the text messages was given to the Dutch Kidney Foundation. The program, due to its controversial nature, had received heavy international criticism in the run-up to the broadcast. In the end, it was revealed during the course of the show that the "terminally ill" woman was, in reality, an actress, although the three candidates were, in fact, real kidney patients; they were aware that Lisa was an actress, and participated because they were supportive of BNN's cause to give awareness to the limited number of organ donors in the Netherlands   more
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38

Calaveras Skull

The Calaveras Skull was a human skull found by miners in Calaveras County, California, which was purported to prove that humans, mastodons, and elephants had coexisted in California. It was later revealed to be a hoax. Coincidentally, "calaveras" is...  the Spanish word for "skulls"   more
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39

Cardiff Giant

The Cardiff Giant was one of the most famous hoaxes in United States history. It was a 10-foot tall purported "petrified man" uncovered on October 16, 1869, by workers digging a well behind the barn of William C. "Stub" Newell in Cardiff, New York. ... Both it and an unauthorized copy made by P.T. Barnum are still on display   more
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40

Ireland Shakespeare forgeries

The Ireland Shakespeare forgeries were a cause célèbre in 1790s London, when author and engraver Samuel Ireland announced the discovery of a treasure-trove of Shakespearean manuscripts by his son William Henry Ireland. Among them were the manuscript... s of four plays, two of them previously unknown. Such respected literary figures as James Boswell and poet-laureate Henry James Pye pronounced them genuine, as did various antiquarian experts. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, the leading theatre manager of his day, agreed to present one of the newly discovered plays with John Philip Kemble in the starring rôle. Excitement over the biographical and literary significance of the find turned to acrimony when it was charged that the documents were forgeries. Edmond Malone, the greatest Shakespeare scholar of his time, showed conclusively that the language, orthography, and handwriting were not those of the times and persons to which they were credited, and William Henry Ireland, the supposed discoverer, confessed to the fraud   more
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41

Lady Hope Story

Elizabeth Reid Cotton, Lady Hope was a British evangelist who encouraged women preaching to men and the Temperance movement.In 1915, Hope claimed to have visited the British naturalist Charles Darwin shortly before his death in 1882, during which in... terview Hope said Darwin spoke of second thoughts about publicising the theory of evolution. That Hope visited Darwin is possibly true, though her interpretation of what Darwin said at the putative interview is much less likely   more
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42

Cottingley Fairies

The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, near Bradford in England. In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 years ol... d and Frances was 9. The pictures came to the attention of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who used them to illustrate an article on fairies he had been commissioned to write for the Christmas 1920 edition of The Strand Magazine. Doyle, as a spiritualist, was enthusiastic about the photographs, and interpreted them as clear and visible evidence of psychic phenomena. Public reaction was mixed; some accepted the images as genuine, but others believed they had been faked.Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually declined after 1921. Both girls married and lived abroad for a time after they grew up, yet the photographs continued to hold the public imagination. In 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper traced Elsie, who had by then returned to the UK. Elsie left open the possibility that she believed she had photographed her thoughts, and the media once again became interested in the story   more
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43

Jackalope

The jackalope is a mythical animal of North American folklore described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns or deer antlers and sometimes a pheasant's tail. The word "jackalope" is a portmanteau of "jackrabbit" and "antelope".The story of the jackal... ope was popularised in Wyoming in the 1930s after a local hunter used taxidermy skills to graft deer antlers onto a jackrabbit carcass, selling the creature to a local hotel. It is possible that the tales of jackalopes were inspired by sightings of rabbits infected with the Shope papilloma virus, which causes the growth of horn- and antler-like tumors in various places on the rabbit's head and body. The concept of an animal hybrid occurs in many cultures, such as the griffin and the chimera, and horned hares were described in medieval and early Renaissance texts   more
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44

Horn Papers

The Horn Papers were a genealogical hoax consisting of forged historical records pertaining to the northeastern United States for the period from 1765 to 1795. They were published by William F. Horn of Topeka, Kansas between 1933 and 1936, and prese... nted as a transcription of documents of his great-great-great grandfather, Jacob Horn, and other members of the Horn family.The Horn Papers first appeared publicly in 1932 in letters sent from Topeka to the editors of the Washington, Pennsylvania Observer and the Waynesburg, Pennsylvania Democrat-Messenger in which their author claimed to possess important historical documents relating to the area. From 1933 to 1936 the newspapers printed excerpts from Horn's manuscripts and diaries. Horn even moved to his ancestral home of Waynesburg and through speeches became well known as an historical expert.Material in the papers included diaries, Virginia court records, and maps. They were notable for their great level of detail, especially concerning the lives of the common people   more
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45

The English Mercurie

The English Mercurie is a literary hoax purporting to be the first English newspaper. It is apparently an account of the English battle with the Spanish Armada of 1588, but was in fact written by the second Earl of Hardwicke, Philip Yorke, in the 18... th century as a literary game with some friends. Although the hoax was debunked in 1839, copies of the Mercurie are still mistakenly referred to as factual accounts in the modern era   more
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46

Pseudo-Isidorian Decretals

The Pseudo-Isidorean Decretals are a set of extensive and influential medieval forgeries, written by a scholar or group of scholars known as Pseudo-Isidore. The authors, who worked under the pseudonym Isidore Mercator, were probably a group of Frank... ish clerics writing in the second quarter of the ninth century. They aimed to defend the position of bishops against metropolitans and secular authorities by creating false documents purportedly authored by early popes, together with interpolated conciliar documents   more
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47

Mary Toft

Mary Toft, also spelled Tofts, was an English woman from Godalming, Surrey, who in 1726 became the subject of considerable controversy when she tricked doctors into believing that she had given birth to rabbits.In 1726 Toft became pregnant, but foll... owing her reported fascination with the sighting of a rabbit, she miscarried. Her claim to have given birth to various animal parts prompted the arrival of John Howard, a local surgeon, who investigated the matter. He delivered several pieces of animal flesh and duly notified other prominent physicians, which brought the case to the attention of Nathaniel St. André, surgeon to the Royal Household of King George I. St. André concluded that Toft's case was genuine but the king also sent surgeon Cyriacus Ahlers, who remained sceptical. By then quite famous, Toft was brought to London and studied at length, where under intense scrutiny and producing no more rabbits she confessed to the hoax, and was subsequently imprisoned as a fraud.The resultant public mockery created panic within the medical profession and ruined the careers of several prominent surgeons   more
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48

ID Sniper rifle

The ID Sniper rifle is an art project, a fictional, hoax weapon devised by artist Jakob Boeskov and industrial designer Kristian von Bengtson. The ID Sniper supposedly shoots GPS chips, and the police force may tag persons with this rifle for later ... easy retrieval. It was produced by the fictional company Empire North.According to its specs, "It will feel like a mosquito-bite lasting a fraction of a second. At the same time a digital camcorder with a zoom-lens fitted within the scope will take a high-resolution picture of the target. This picture will be stored on a memory card for later image-analysis.   more
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49

Villejuif leaflet

The Villejuif leaflet, also known as the Villejuif flyer and the Villejuif list, was a pamphlet which enjoyed wide distribution. The leaflet listed a number of safe food additives with their E numbers as alleged carcinogens. The leaflet caused mass ... panic in Europe in the late 1970s and 1980s. One of the entries on the list was citric acid.Its name derives from its false claim to have been produced at the hospital in Villejuif   more
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50

Psychic surgery

Psychic surgery is a means of committing a pseudoscientific medical fraud using a conjuring trick, involving the pretense of creating an incision using only the bare hands, the removal of pathological matter, and finally the spontaneous healing of t... he incision.It has been denounced by the US Federal Trade Commission as a "total hoax", and the American Cancer Society maintains that psychic surgery may cause needless death by keeping the ill away from life-saving medical care. Medical professionals and skeptics classify it as sleight of hand and any positive results as a placebo effect. It first appeared in the Spiritualist communities of the Philippines and Brazil in the middle of the 20th century, and it has taken different paths in those two countries   more
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51

Society for Indecency to Naked Animals

The Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, or SINA [pronounced "sinna"], was a satiric hoax perpetrated by comedian Alan Abel from 1959 to 1962. In 1959 Abel wrote a satirical story about this imaginary organization for The Saturday Evening Post bu... t the editors rejected it. Abel then transformed his story into a series of press releases from the organization that garnered media attention. The group used the language and rhetoric of conservative moralists for the aim of clothing naked animals, including pets, barnyard animals, and large wildlife. An alleged debate within SINA was how large an animal had to be to require clothing. Slogans such as "Decency today means morality tomorrow" and "A nude horse is a rude horse" were offered. Abel persuaded the actor Buck Henry to play the group president, G. Clifford Prout, in public appearances and Abel played the group vice president   more
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52

Great Wall of China hoax

The Great Wall of China hoax was a faked story, published in United States newspapers on June 25, 1899, about bids by American businesses to demolish the Great Wall of China and construct a road in its place.In 1939, an urban legend began when Denve... r songwriter Harry Lee Wilber claimed in a magazine article that the 1899 hoax had ignited the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. Paul Harvey and Dwight Sands perpetuated the legend. Variations have been incorporated into sermons about "the power of the tongue," a morality tale used by preachers to highlight the consequences of lying.The fact, however, is that Boxer activity intensified in response to the German invasion in Shandong during March 1899 - before the hoax was invented in Denver. No Chinese history reference relates the hoax to the Boxer Rebellion   more
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53

Disumbrationism

Disumbrationism was a hoax masquerading as an art movement that was launched in 1924 by Paul Jordan-Smith, a novelist, Latin scholar, and authority on Robert Burton from Los Angeles, California.Annoyed at the cold reception his wife, Sarah Bixby Smi... th's realistic still lifes had received from an art exhibition jury, Jordan-Smith sought revenge by styling himself as "Pavel Jerdanowitch", a variation on his own name, and entering a blurry, badly painted picture of a Pacific islander woman brandishing a banana skin, under the title "Exaltation". He made a suitably dark and brooding photograph of himself as Jerdanowitch, and submitted the work to the same group of critics as representative of the new school, "Disumbrationism". He explained "Exaltation" as a symbol of "breaking the shackles of womanhood." To his dismay, if not to his surprise, the Disumbrationist daub won praise from the critics who had belittled his wife's realistic painting   more
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54

Thatchergate

Thatchergate was the colloquial title of a hoax perpetrated by members of the anarcho-punk band Crass during the aftermath of the 1982 Falklands War. Using excerpts from speeches by Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, a recording was spliced togeth... er which purported to be a telephone conversation between the two leaders. During the course of the tape Reagan seems to state his intention to use Europe as a battle front to show the Soviet leaders the US's resolve in a nuclear conflict, whilst Thatcher appears to imply that the HMS Sheffield was deliberately sacrificed in order to escalate the Falklands war.When the recording first surfaced into the public domain in 1983, it was initially considered by the US State Department to have been propaganda produced by the Soviet KGB, a story reported by both the San Francisco Chronicle and The Sunday Times. However, coverage of the tape by the UK broadsheet The Observer in January 1984 identified the true source as Crass. Crass have stated that great care was taken to ensure their anonymity, and that to this day it is a mystery as to how Observer journalists were able to trace the hoax back to the   more
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55

Taxil hoax

The Taxil hoax was an 1890s hoax of exposure by Léo Taxil intended to mock not only Freemasonry, but also the Roman Catholic Church's opposition to it.
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56

A Racial Program for the Twentieth Century

A Racial Program for the Twentieth Century is an antisemitic hoax promoted by Eustace Mullins. It is often cited as "proof" of a Jewish and/or Communist plot against white Americans, in much the same way as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, anoth... er forged document, is used as "proof" of a Jewish global domination conspiracy   more
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57

The New York Zoo hoax

A famous hoax at the zoo is also known as The Central Park Zoo Escape and the Central Park Menagerie Scare of 1874. It was a hoax perpetrated by James Gordon Bennett, Jr. In his newspaper, the New York Herald. The Herald's cover story claimed that t... here had been a mass escape of animals from the Central Park Zoo and several people had been killed by the now free-roaming beasts. A rhinoceros was said to be the first escapee, goring his keeper to death and setting into motion the escape of his neighbors. Other animals the Herald reported free and included "a polar bear, a panther, a Numidian lion, several hyenas, and a Bengal tiger." At the end of the lengthy article, which was divided across several pages of the newspaper, the following notice was the only indication that the story horrifying readers across the city was a hoax: “Of course, the entire story given above is a pure fabrication. Not one word of it is true.” That was not enough to assuage critics, however, who accused Bennett of inciting panic when the extent of the hoax became widely known. The authors later claimed their intent was merely to draw attention to inadequate safety precautions at the zoo, and claimed to be surprised at the extent of the reaction to their story   more
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58

Pickled dragon

In December 2003, David Hart claimed to have found a pickled dragon or, more precisely, what appeared to be the foetus of a winged reptile-type creature preserved in a 30-inch tall jar of formaldehyde in his garage in Sutton Courtenay, Oxfordshire; ... he then showed it to a friend, Allistair Mitchell, who runs a marketing company in Oxford.The pair had told the press that the dragon was found with documents suggesting it had been offered to the Natural History Museum in the late nineteenth century by German scientists. Mitchell suggested it was an attempt by the Germans to discredit their British colleagues.According to their story, David Hart's grandfather, said to have been a porter at the museum, saved the specimen from being destroyed; it had then been left in a crate in his garage by Hart's father and had remained there for twenty years before being "rediscovered".In reality the dragon was made by the model-makers behind the BBC TV series Walking with Dinosaurs, and the jar was made by a specialist glass blowing studio   more
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59

Pope Joan

Pope Joan was a mythical female pope who allegedly reigned for a few years some time during the Middle Ages. The story first appeared in 13th-century chronicles, and was subsequently spread and embellished throughout Europe. It was widely believed f... or centuries, though most modern historians consider it fictitious, perhaps deriving from historicized folklore regarding Roman monuments or from anti-papal satire.The first mention of the mythical female pope appears in the chronicle of Jean de Mailly, but the most popular and influential version was that interpolated into Martin of Opava's Chronicon Pontificum et Imperatorum, later in the 13th century. Most versions of her story describe her as a talented and learned woman who disguises herself as a man, often at the behest of a lover. In the most common accounts, due to her abilities, she rises through the church hierarchy, eventually being elected pope; however, while riding on horseback, she gives birth, thus exposing her sex. In most versions, she dies shortly after, either being killed by an angry mob or from natural causes. Her memory is then shunned by her successors   more
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60

The Protocols of the Elders of Zion

The Protocols of the Elders of Zion or The Protocols of the Meetings of the Learned Elders of Zion is an antisemitic hoax purporting to describe a Jewish plan for global domination. It was first published in Russia in 1903, translated into multiple ... languages, and disseminated internationally in the early part of the 20th century. Henry Ford funded printing of 500,000 copies that were distributed throughout the US in the 1920s.Adolf Hitler and the Nazis publicized the text as though it were a valid document, although it had already been exposed as fraudulent. After the Nazi Party came to power in 1933, it ordered the text to be studied in German classrooms. The historian Norman Cohn suggested that Hitler used the Protocols as his primary justification for initiating the Holocaust—his "warrant for genocide".The Protocols purports to document the minutes of a late 19th-century meeting of Jewish leaders discussing their goal of global Jewish hegemony by subverting the morals of Gentiles, and by controlling the press and the world's economies   more
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61

Mars hoax

The Mars hoax was a hoax circulated by e-mail that began in 2002, that claimed that Mars would look as large as the full Moon to the naked eye on August 27, 2003. The hoax, which has since resurfaced every year from 2005 through 2014, began from a m... isinterpretation and exaggeration of a sentence in an e-mail message that reported the close encounter between Mars and the Earth in August 2003. At that time, the distance between the two planets was about 55,758,000 kilometers, which was the closest distance between them since September 24, 57,617 BC, when the distance has been calculated to have been about 55,718,000 kilometers   more
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62

Genpet

Genpets are a mixed media installation art piece by artist Adam Brandejs. It is considered a hoax of exposure. The project has been shown in multiple galleries in Canada and Europe and has garnered some attention in the mass media.The creations were...  sculpted, automated creatures made of latex and plastic, and housed robotic circuitry to simulate slow respiration. They looked like small, baldskinned and ugly humanoids, and were intended to be displayed as living, but dormant, bioengineered creatures for purchase as pets. The fabricated packaging indicated a purchaser had a choice of colors, for different personalities and levels of activity, and that the creatures had a limited vocal capacity. The sculptures and packaging, along with the professional-appearing hoax website, are so realistic that observers are often fooled.In 2006, Genpets were featured on the weblog for The Museum of Hoaxes in San Diego, California. As well as broadcast on BBC News Worldwide on a BBC programme called Click as well as the Times, the New York Times and G4TechTV   more
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63

The Turk

The Turk, also known as the Mechanical Turk or Automaton Chess Player, was a fake chess-playing machine constructed in the late 18th century. From 1770 until its destruction by fire in 1854, it was exhibited by various owners as an automaton, though...  it was exposed in the early 1820s as an elaborate hoax. Constructed and unveiled in 1770 by Wolfgang von Kempelen to impress the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, the mechanism appeared to be able to play a strong game of chess against a human opponent, as well as perform the knight's tour, a puzzle that requires the player to move a knight to occupy every square of a chessboard exactly once.The Turk was in fact a mechanical illusion that allowed a human chess master hiding inside to operate the machine. With a skilled operator, the Turk won most of the games played during its demonstrations around Europe and the Americas for nearly 84 years, playing and defeating many challengers including statesmen such as Napoleon Bonaparte and Benjamin Franklin. The operator within the mechanism during Kempelen's original tour remains a mystery   more
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64

George Mason University's historical hoaxes

Students of George Mason University, as part of Professor T. Mills Kelly’s course – “Lying about the past”, have created two popular hoaxes: the "Edward Owens hoax," and the "Reddit serial killer hoax." It is a goal of the course to create a sweepin... g internet deception. As Prof. Kelly stated in the course’s syllabus   more
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65

Ompax spatuloides Castelnau

The Ompax spatuloides was a hoax fish "discovered" in Australia in August, 1872. Said to be poisonous, it could be found on some lists of Australian fishes through the 1930s.The fish was a joke perpetrated by people at Gayndah station, Queensland, w... ho prepared it from the body of a mullet, the tail of an eel and the head of a platypus or needlefish. They served it cooked for Carl Staiger, the director of the Brisbane Museum, and he forwarded a sketch and description of the fake to expert Francis de Laporte de Castelnau, who described the supposed "species" in 1879   more
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66

Skvader

The skvader is a Swedish fictional creature that was constructed in 1918 by the taxidermist Rudolf Granberg and is permanently displayed at the museum at Norra Berget in Sundsvall. It has the forequarters and hindlegs of a European hare, and the bac... k, wings and tail of a female wood grouse. It was later jokingly given the Latin name Tetrao lepus pseudo-hybridus rarissimus L   more
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67

Surgeon's Photo

The "Surgeon's Photograph" (pictured above) is purported to be the first photo of a "head and neck",[36] and is one of the most iconic Nessie photos. Supposedly taken by Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London gynaecologist, it was published in the Daily Ma... il on 21 April 1934. Wilson's refusal to have his name associated with the photograph led to it being nicknamed the "Surgeon's Photograph". He claimed that he was looking at the loch when he saw the monster, so he grabbed his camera and snapped four photos. Only two exposures came out clear: the first one shows what was claimed to be a small head and back, while the second one shows a similar head in a diving position. The first one was more iconic one, while the second attracted little publicity because it was difficult to interpret what was depicted, due to its blurry quality   more
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68

Great Moon Hoax

"The Great Moon Hoax" refers to a series of six articles that were published in The Sun, a New York newspaper, beginning on August 25, 1835, about the supposed discovery of life and even civilization on the Moon. The discoveries were falsely attribu... ted to Sir John Herschel, perhaps the best-known astronomer of his time.The story was advertised on August 21, 1835, as an upcoming feature allegedly reprinted from The Edinburgh Courant. The first in a series of six was published four days later on August 25   more
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69

Sokal affair

The Sokal affair, also called the Sokal hoax, was a publishing hoax perpetrated by Alan Sokal, a physics professor at New York University and University College London. In 1996, Sokal submitted an article to Social Text, an academic journal of postm... odern cultural studies. The submission was an experiment to test the journal's intellectual rigor and, specifically, to investigate whether "a leading North American journal of cultural studies – whose editorial collective includes such luminaries as Fredric Jameson and Andrew Ross – [would] publish an article liberally salted with nonsense if it sounded good and it flattered the editors' ideological preconceptions".The article, "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity", was published in the Social Text spring/summer 1996 "Science Wars" issue. It proposed that quantum gravity is a social and linguistic construct. At that time, the journal did not practice academic peer review and it did not submit the article for outside expert review by a physicist   more
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70

Bonsai Kitten

Bonsai Kitten is a satirical website that claims to provide instructions on how to grow a kitten in a jar, so as to mold the bones of the kitten into the shape of the jar as the cat grows, much like how a bonsai plant is shaped. It was made by an MI... T university student going by the alias of Dr. Michael Wong Chang. The website generated furor after members of the public complained to animal rights organizations, who stated that "while the site's content may be faked, the issue it is campaigning for may create violence towards animals", according to the Michigan Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Although the website in its most recent form was shut down, it still generates petitions to shut the site down or complain to its ISP. The website has been thoroughly debunked by Snopes.Com and The Humane Society of the United States, among other prominent organizations   more
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71

Princess Caraboo

Mary Baker was a noted impostor who went by the name Princess Caraboo. She pretended to be from a far off island kingdom and fooled a British town for some months.
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72

Yellowcake forgery

The Niger uranium forgeries are forged documents initially revealed by SISMI. These documents seem to depict an attempt made by Saddam Hussein in Iraq to purchase yellowcake uranium powder from Niger during the Iraq disarmament crisis.On the basis o... f these documents and other indicators, the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom asserted that Iraq violated United Nations Iraq sanctions by attempting to procure nuclear material for the purpose of creating weapons of mass destruction   more
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73

Seriously McDonalds

"Seriously McDonalds" is the name under which a viral photograph was spread in June 2011. The photograph shows a sign, which is in fact a hoax, claiming that McDonald's has implemented a new policy charging African-Americans more, as "an insurance m... easure". Despite having existed for some time, the picture was spread around the Internet, especially on Twitter, in June 2011, by people who were offended or amused by the photograph. McDonald's acted quickly to deny the legitimacy of the sign, but it continued to trend on Twitter under the hashtag "#SeriouslyMcDonalds" and "#seriouslymcdonalds" for a few days. The company's response to the hoax has received praise from journalists and public relations professionals   more
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74

Southern Television broadcast interruption

The Southern Television broadcast interruption was a broadcast interruption through the Hannington transmitter of the Independent Broadcasting Authority in the United Kingdom at 5:10 pm on 26 November 1977. The broadcast message is generally conside... red to be a hoax, but the identity of the hijacker is unknown   more
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75

Our First Time

Our First Time was one of the first widely popularized Internet hoaxes. Eighteen-year-olds "Mike" and "Diane" made a public announcement declaring they were to lose their virginity.OFT, which promoted itself as a free public service educational webs... ite, followed Mike and Diane day by day from July 18 to July 21, 1998 through HIV tests, condom selection, and telling their parents about their decision. So many millions of people attempted to view the site that the server crashed. The Internet Entertainment Group agreed to host it in exchange for links to their pornographic content.Over time, some began to suspect it was a hoax. Mike and Diane looked older than 18 and appeared to be actors. "Mike" turned out to be an Alabama actor Ty Taylor and "Diane" turned out to be Michelle Parma, a former Dallas Cowboys cheerleader.The enterprise fizzled when IEG backed out after the producer, Ken Tipton, revealed that his plan was make money by charging Internet users $5 each for "age-verification" but planned for the couple to decide to abstain on the day set for the deflowering.Complete details are at http://www.beholder.com/RobertWiseMemorial.ph   more
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76

Q33 NY

After September 11, 2001, an email was circulated claiming that entering "Q33 NY", which it claims is the flight number of the first plane to hit the Twin Towers, or the address of the World Trade Center, in Wingdings would bring up a character sequ... ence of a plane flying into two towers, followed by the skull and crossbones symbol and the Star of David. This is a hoax: the flight numbers of the two airplanes that hit the towers were American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175   more
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77

Straith Letter Hoax

In 1957 Adamski received a letter signed "R.E. Straith," alleged representative of the "Cultural Exchange Committee" of the U.S. State Department. The letter said the U.S. Government knew that Adamski had spoken to extraterrestrials in a California ... desert in 1952, and that a group of highly placed government officials planned on public corroboration of Adamski's story. Adamski was proud of this endorsement and exhibited it to support his claims. However, in 2002 ufologist James W. Moseley revealed that the letter was a hoax. Moseley said he and his friend Gray Barker had obtained some official State Department letterheads, created the R.E. Straith persona, and then written the letter to Adamski as a prank. According to Moseley, the FBI investigated the case and discovered that the letter was a hoax, but charges were not filed against Moseley or Barker. Moseley also wrote that the FBI informed Adamski that the Straith letter was a hoax and asked him to stop using it as evidence in support of his claims, but that Adamski refused and continued to display the letter in his lectures and talks. This was not the first time Adamski had claimed government support for his UFO stories. In 1953 he told a meeting of the Corona, California Lions Club that his "material has all been cleared with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Air Force Intelligence." When the FBI learned of Adamski's claims, three agents were sent to talk to Adamski. He denied having stated that the FBI or AF intelligence supported his claims (even though they were reported in a local newspaper, the Riverside Enterprise), and he agreed to sign a letter stating that "he understood the implications of making false claims" and that the FBI "did not endorse [the claims] of individuals." The three FBI agents also signed the letter, and a copy was given to Adamski. However, a few months later Adamski told an interviewer that he had been "cleared" by the FBI, and displayed the letter as proof. When the Los Angeles Better Business Bureau complained, more FBI agents were sent to retrieve Adamski's copy of the letter, "read the riot act to him, and warn him that legal action would be taken if he continued" to claim FBI or government support for his stories. Adamski later said the FBI had "warned [him] to keep quiet.   more
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78

Amina Abdallah Arraf al Omari

Amina Abdallah Arraf al Omari was a fictional character or hoax persona created and maintained by American Tom MacMaster. The identity was presented as a Syrian-American blogger, identifying herself as a lesbian on her weblog A Gay Girl In Damascus ... and blogging in support of increased civil and political freedom for Syrians. During the 2011 Syrian uprising, a posting on the blog purportedly by "Amina's" cousin claimed that Amina was abducted on 6 June 2011. This sparked a strong backlash from the LGBT community and was covered widely in mainstream media.In the wake of the reports, questions arose regarding the possibility that Arraf al Omari was an elaborate hoax. On 7 June 2011, author/blogger Liz Henry, Andy Carvin and others raised doubts about the identity of the blogger. The photos purported to be of her were proven to be a Croatian woman residing in Britain with no relation to Syria, the blog, or the ongoing protests in the country. On June 12, Ali Abunimah and Benjamin Doherty of the website Electronic Intifada conducted an investigation that pointed to a strong possibility that the identity of "Amina" was MacMaster, an American living in Edinburgh   more
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79

The Archko Volume

The Archko Volume or Archko Library is a 19th-century volume containing what purports to be a series of reports from Jewish and pagan sources contemporary with Christ that relate to the life and death of Jesus. The work went through a number of vers... ions and has remained in print ever since. The texts are otherwise unknown, and the author was convicted by an ecclesiastical court of falsehood and plagiarism   more
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cludwig says2015-04-03T15:35:53.5862110-05:00
I appreciate the effort put in to the creation of this Poll. My favorite was the Cold Fusion Hoax.
UtherPenguin says2015-04-03T15:36:31.7030033-05:00
The Moon Landing
PetersSmith says2015-04-03T15:37:32.7679548-05:00
UtherPenguin: I put other for a reason, wise guy.
UtherPenguin says2015-04-03T15:41:06.6182787-05:00
How did you make so many options.
PetersSmith says2015-04-03T15:42:17.4257709-05:00
UtherPenguin: Clicked the add answer button 77 times.
UtherPenguin says2015-04-03T15:46:10.8100422-05:00
Wouldn't be surprised if Heil comes in and starts saying "the Holohoax"
TBR says2015-04-03T16:34:07.6202961-05:00
Some good new ones in there. New to me that is.
Epic9988 says2015-04-03T23:24:50.4307085-05:00
UtherPenguin: Your evidence for that, please?

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