Favorite leader of the Soviet Union or President of Russia?

Posted by: PetersSmith

Who wants to hear Putin speak English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awWAd-jdwDg

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25 Total Votes
1

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev is a former Soviet statesman. He was the eighth and last leader of the Soviet Union, having served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991, and as the country's head of state...  from 1988 until its dissolution in 1991. He was the only general secretary in the history of the Soviet Union to have been born after the October Revolution.Gorbachev was born in Stavropol Krai into a peasant Ukrainian–Russian family, and in his teens operated combine harvesters on collective farms. He graduated from Moscow State University in 1955 with a degree in law. While he was at the university, he joined the Communist Party, and soon became very active within it. In 1970, he was appointed the First Party Secretary of the Stavropol Regional Committee, First Secretary to the Supreme Soviet in 1974, and appointed a member of the Politburo in 1979. Within three years of the death of Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, following the brief "interregna" of Andropov and Chernenko, Gorbachev was elected General Secretary by the Politburo in 1985   more
9 votes
3 comments
2

Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin has been the President of Russia since 7 May 2012. Putin previously served as President from 2000 to 2008, and as Prime Minister of Russia from 1999 to 2000 and again from 2008 to 2012. During his last term as Prime Mini... ster, he was also the Chairman of United Russia, the ruling party.For 16 years Putin was an officer in the KGB, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel before he retired to enter politics in his native Saint Petersburg in 1991. He moved to Moscow in 1996 and joined President Boris Yeltsin's administration where he rose quickly, becoming Acting President on 31 December 1999 when Yeltsin unexpectedly resigned. Putin won the subsequent 2000 presidential election and was reelected in 2004. Because of constitutionally mandated term limits, Putin was ineligible to run for a third consecutive presidential term in 2008. Dmitry Medvedev won the 2008 presidential election and appointed Putin as Prime Minister, beginning a period of so-called "tandemocracy"   more
5 votes
3 comments
3

I don't like the Soviet or Russian Federation leaders.

Outside Kalinka, a Russian delicatessen and grocers on London's bustling Queensway, customers were uneasy . "I am shocked," says one, an electrician, who came to London 12 years ago to work on building sites. He remembers the stereotyping of his fel... low Russians back then. "It was Russians are rude. And they are drinking beer. And they are drinking vodka. But it was funny. It was soft humour. "Now, the newspapers are definitely trying to mix the opinions of people against Russian culture and people. Now it is Russians are killers." He is far from alone among Russians living in London to have noticed a backlash since the downing of flight MH17. Like most, he too, speaks only on condition of anonymity. "There are pictures of Putin. The word "killer" on the front pages," said Anna, a Russian-born pharmaceutical consultant. "Then page after page, until page 12 or something, when it's Gaza. Russians are killers. How do you think it affects us?" "Do you believe in collective punishment? Do you want to bomb people for their nationality?" she asks. "It's actually official policy now to hate Russians." Of course, she said, she has no idea of the exact circumstances that led to shooting of the plane and loss of 298 lives. "But the British culture is to find a culprit. Bully them. Bully those around them. Don't bother to investigate. Judge on very superficial grounds. Let's bully his daughter. Let's find someone who played judo with this man and bully them too. "Surround him with hate so the Russians will throw him out. But the Russians won't throw him out," she added. "Everyone is suffering. Collective punishment is not the answer." Among his friends, Sasha, a retired Russian army officer who has lived in London for more than 20 years, now finds "a great deal of sadness, and fear, fear that the lunacy will escalate. "It is easy to resurrect antagonism towards Russia because people remember the cold war, and when something goes wrong in Russia it's magnified," he said. Sanctions would hit the middle and lower income Russians "the tourists, the students who fill the universities" and not "the big people, who don't care". Across London in the City, fears are also for business. One director of a reinsurance broker, whose company works in 20 different countries, many from the former Soviet Union, said his concern about media coverage was "that there is no presumption of innocence in this case. "It looked as if the story was ready for the mass media before the aircraft came down. "All this blaming Russians, I am Russian English. I have been living here for 25 years. I don't quite like Putin's politics. But, unfortunately, all this has really pushed me over to the Russian side, which I haven't been since the events started in the Ukraine." He fears a break "in connections which have been set up over the last 20 to 25 years, based on information that has not been verified". Others fear a trade slump will lead to job losses. "If there is no business with Russia, it inevitably will affect our employability because we sell our language skills," said one insurance worker. Now living in London, she was born in Russia before moving to Ukraine, where her parents still live. She was visiting them when the plane was shot down. "My parents have both Ukrainian and Russian channels. And the story was so contradictory if you switched from Russian TV to Ukrainian TV. It is actually scary how the same event can be shown from a different perspective and you just didn't know what to believe," she said. "They are trading accusations, and both seem equally credible. My advice would be not to listen to either." She has found British media "more or less objective" but is concerned how comments translate into Russian. "I can hear what David Cameron says in English and it's sort of all right. Once it is translated into Russian it sounds really harsh. That really is an issue. When it's taken out of context, and translated, it can sound almost opposite to what was said," she said   more
4 votes
1 comment
4

Vladimir Lenin

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, alias Lenin was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist. He served as head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1917, and of the Soviet Union from 1922 until his...  death. Under his administration, the Russian Empire was replaced by the Soviet Union; all wealth including land, industry and business was nationalized. Based in Marxism, his political theories are known as Leninism.Born to a wealthy middle-class family in Simbirsk, Lenin gained an interest in revolutionary leftist politics following the execution of his brother Aleksandr in 1887. Expelled from Kazan State University for participating in anti-Tsarist protests, he devoted the following years to a law degree and to radical politics, becoming a Marxist. In 1893 he moved to St Petersburg, and became a senior figure in the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party. Arrested for sedition and exiled to Siberia for three years, he married Nadezhda Krupskaya, and fled to Western Europe, where he became known as a prominent party theorist   more
4 votes
3 comments
5

Joseph Stalin

Joseph Stalin or Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953.Among the Bolshevik revolutionaries who took part in the Russian Revolution of 1917, Stalin was appointed general secretary of...  the party's Central Committee in 1922. He subsequently managed to consolidate power following the 1924 death of Vladimir Lenin through suppressing Lenin's criticisms and expanding the functions of his role, all the while eliminating any opposition. He remained general secretary until the post was abolished in 1952, concurrently serving as the Premier of the Soviet Union from 1941 onward.Under Stalin's rule, the concept of "socialism in one country" became a central tenet of Soviet society. He replaced the New Economic Policy introduced by Lenin in the early 1920s with a highly centralised command economy, launching a period of industrialization and collectivization that resulted in the rapid transformation of the USSR from an agrarian society into an industrial power. However, the economic changes coincided with the imprisonment of millions of people in correctional labour camps   more
3 votes
1 comment
6

Georgy Malenkov

Georgy Maximilianovich Malenkov was a Soviet politician and Communist Party leader.His family connections with Lenin speeded his promotion in the party, and in 1925 he was put in charge of the party records. This brought him into close association w... ith Joseph Stalin, and he was heavily involved in the purges of the 1930s. During World War II, he was given sole responsibility for the Soviet missile program. Later he gained favour with Stalin by discrediting Marshal Zhukov for supposed disloyalty, and supporting Stalin’s campaign to erase all the glories of Leningrad/St. Petersburg in the public mind, in order to promote Moscow as the cultural capital.On Stalin’s death in 1953, Malenkov was briefly party leader, but was soon replaced by Nikita Khrushchev, with Malenkov as premier, as the party did not want both functions entrusted to the same person. His 2-year term ended in failure. He was expelled from the Politburo in 1957, and from the party in 1961, being exiled to the remote province of Kazakhstan   more
0 votes
0 comments
7

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev was a Russian politician who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War. He served as First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or P... remier, from 1958 to 1964. Khrushchev was responsible for the de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, for backing the progress of the early Soviet space program, and for several relatively liberal reforms in areas of domestic policy. Khrushchev's party colleagues removed him from power in 1964, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier.Khrushchev was born in the village of Kalinovka in 1894, close to the present-day border between Russia and Ukraine. He was employed as a metalworker in his youth, and during the Russian Civil War was a political commissar. With the help of Lazar Kaganovich, he worked his way up the Soviet hierarchy. He supported Joseph Stalin's purges, and approved thousands of arrests. In 1939, Stalin sent him to govern Ukraine, and he continued the purges there   more
0 votes
0 comments
8

Leonid Brezhnev

Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev was the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, presiding over the country from 1964 until his death in 1982. His eighteen-year term as General Secretary was second only to that o... f Joseph Stalin in duration. During Brezhnev's rule, the global influence of the Soviet Union grew dramatically, in part because of the expansion of the Soviet military during this time. His tenure as leader was marked by the beginning of an era of economic and social stagnation in the Soviet Union.Brezhnev was born in Kamenskoe into a Russian worker's family. After graduating from the Dniprodzerzhynsk Metallurgical Technicum, he became a metallurgical engineer in the iron and steel industry, in Ukraine. He joined Komsomol in 1923, and in 1929 became an active member of the CPSU. He was drafted into immediate military service during World War II and left the army in 1946 with the rank of Major General. In 1952 Brezhnev became a member of the Central Committee, and in 1964, Brezhnev succeeded Nikita Khrushchev as First Secretary, while Alexei Kosygin succeeded Khrushchev in his post as Soviet premier   more
0 votes
0 comments
9

Yuri Andropov

Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov was a Soviet politician and the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 12 November 1982 until his death fifteen months later.
0 votes
0 comments
10

Konstantin Chernenko

Konstantin Ustinovich Chernenko was a Soviet politician and the fifth General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. He led the Soviet Union from 13 February 1984 until his death thirteen months later, on 10 March 1985. Chernenko was ... also Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet from 11 April 1984 until his death   more
0 votes
0 comments
11

Gennady Yanayev

Gennady Ivanovich Yanayev was a Soviet politician and statesman whose career spanned the rules of Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Andropov and Chernenko, and culminated during the Gorbachev years. Yanayev was born in Perevoz, Gorky Oblast. After years in loca... l politics, he rose to prominence as Chairman of the All-Union Central Council of Trade Unions, but he also held other lesser posts such as deputy of the Union of Soviet Societies for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries.Due to his chairmanship of the All-Union Central Council of Trade Unions he gained a seat in the 28th Politburo and Secretary of the Central Committee. Later that year, with the help of Mikhail Gorbachev, Yanayev was elected the first, and only, Vice President of the Soviet Union. Having growing doubts about where Gorbachev's reforms were leading, Yanayev started working with, and eventually leading, the Gang of Eight, the group which deposed Gorbachev during the August coup of 1991. After three days the coup collapsed due to the popularity of Boris Yeltsin, but during its brief grip of power Yanayev was made Acting President of the Soviet Union   more
0 votes
0 comments
12

Boris Yeltsin

Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin was a Russian politician and the first President of the Russian Federation, serving from 1991 to 1999.Originally a supporter of Mikhail Gorbachev, Yeltsin emerged under the perestroika reforms as one of Gorbachev's most po... werful political opponents. On 29 May 1990 he was elected the chairman of the Russian Supreme Soviet. On 12 June 1991 he was elected by popular vote to the newly created post of President of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, at that time one of the 15 constituent republics of the Soviet Union. Upon the resignation of Mikhail Gorbachev and the final dissolution of the Soviet Union on 25 December 1991, Yeltsin remained in office as the President of the Russian Federation, the USSR's successor state. Yeltsin was reelected in the 1996 election; in the second round he defeated Gennady Zyuganov from the revived Communist Party by a margin of 13%. However, Yeltsin never recovered his early popularity after a series of economic and political crises in Russia in the 1990s   more
0 votes
0 comments
13

Dmitry Medvedev

Dmitry Anatolyevich Medvedev is the tenth Prime Minister of Russia, incumbent since 2012. He previously served as the third President of Russia, from 2008 to 2012. When he took office at the age of 42, he was the youngest of the three Russian Presid... ents who have served.Born to a family of academics, Medvedev graduated from the Law Department of Leningrad State University in 1987. He defended his dissertation in 1990 and worked as a docent at his alma mater, now renamed the Saint Petersburg State University, where he taught civil and Roman law until 1999. Medvedev's political career began as the election campaign manager and later an adviser of the St. Petersburg Mayor Anatoly Sobchak. During this time, Medvedev befriended Vladimir Putin. In November 1999, Medvedev was hired by the Russian presidential administration, where he worked as deputy chief of staff. In the 2000 Presidential elections, Medvedev was Putin's campaign manager. On 14 November 2005, Medvedev was appointed First Deputy Prime Minister and was tasked with overseeing National Priority Projects. He also worked as the Chairman of Gazprom's board of directors, a post which he held until 2008   more
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Atheist-Independent says2015-01-20T23:27:16.9703671-06:00
Gorbachev is awesome.
Atheist-Independent says2015-01-20T23:27:43.7082529-06:00
But that Stalin of though...
Atheist-Independent says2015-01-20T23:28:01.0863187-06:00
*pic
discomfiting says2015-01-21T09:57:56.2185102-06:00
I honestly love the way right ringers go 'damn russians gonna start ww3 and putin needs to be stopped' but then they're like idolizing him for toxic masculinity and being fascist.
PetersSmith says2015-01-21T10:49:03.5984795-06:00
Atheist-Independent: But Brezhnev's eyebrows though...
vaguelyjewishclearlyfab says2015-01-21T15:41:10.4947097-06:00
Kyler: many of my relatives in Russia say life was better during the Soviet Union. The collapse was not beneficial for everyone.
PapaNolan says2015-01-21T15:42:24.7906527-06:00
Stalin has the greatest facial hair.
PetersSmith says2015-01-21T15:44:39.6067104-06:00
PapaNolan: But dem eyebrows...
debate_power says2015-01-21T18:45:34.7197807-06:00
Gorbachev? How is he even on here? He wasn't competent enough to actually live up to his promises. That's not exactly the hallmark of a good leader. Lenin acted, Gorbachev promised. I mean, how could Lenin have really known Stalin was a wannabe tsar?
PetersSmith says2015-01-21T18:46:23.2254247-06:00
Debate_power: Gorbachev was a leader of the Soviet Union, thus he applies whether you like him or not.
debate_power says2015-01-21T18:47:09.5636132-06:00
Fine

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