Favorite mythological place?

Posted by: PetersSmith

Not putting Heaven, purgatory, and Hell for obvious reasons.

Vote
15 Total Votes
1

Atlantis

Atlantis is the name of a fictional island mentioned within an allegory on the hubris of nations in Plato's works Timaeus and Critias, where it represents the antagonist naval power that besieges "Ancient Athens", the pseudo-historic embodiment of P... lato's ideal state. In the story, Athens was able to repel the Atlantean attack, unlike any other nation of the known world, supposedly giving testament to the superiority of Plato's concept of a state. At the end of the story, Atlantis eventually falls out of favor with the gods and famously submerges into the Atlantic Ocean.Despite its minor importance in Plato's work, the Atlantis story has had a considerable impact on literature. The allegorical aspect of Atlantis was taken up in utopian works of several Renaissance writers, such as Bacon's New Atlantis and More's Utopia. On the other hand, 19th-century amateur scholars misinterpreted Plato's account as historical tradition, most notably in Donnelly's Atlantis: The Antediluvian World   more
3 votes
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2

Avalon

Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legend. It first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 1136 pseudohistorical account Historia Regum Britanniae as the place where King Arthur's sword Excalibur was forged and later where Arthur was ... taken to recover from his wounds after the Battle of Camlann. Avalon was associated from an early date with mystical practices and people such as Morgan le Fay   more
2 votes
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3

Garden of Eden

The Garden of Eden is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel. The "garden of God", not called Eden, is mentioned in Genesis 14, and the "trees of the garden" are ... mentioned in Ezekiel 31. The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.Traditionally, the favoured derivation of the name "Eden" was from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word meaning "plain" or "steppe". Eden is now believed to be more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning "fruitful, well-watered." The Hebrew term is translated "pleasure" in Sarah's secret saying in Genesis 18:12.The story of Eden echoes the Mesopotamian myth of a king, as a primordial man, who is placed in a divine garden to guard the tree of life. In the Hebrew Bible, Adam and Eve are depicted as walking around the Garden of Eden naked due to their innocence. Eden and its rivers may signify the real Jerusalem, the Temple of Solomon, or the Promised Land. It may also represent the divine garden on Zion, and the mountain of God, which was also Jerusalem   more
2 votes
1 comment
4

Barzakh

Barzakh is an Arabic word meaning "obstacle", "hindrance", "separation", or "barrier". In Islamic eschatology, though largely up to interpretation, al-Barzakh is generally viewed as the barrier between the physical and spiritual worlds, in which the...  soul awaits after death and before resurrection on Qiyamah   more
2 votes
1 comment
5

Valhalla

In Norse mythology, Valhalla is a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin. Chosen by Odin, half of those who die in combat travel to Valhalla upon death, led by valkyries, while the other half go to the goddess Freyja's...  field Fólkvangr. In Valhalla, the dead join the masses of those who have died in combat known as Einherjar, as well as various legendary Germanic heroes and kings, as they prepare to aid Odin during the events of Ragnarök. Before the hall stands the golden tree Glasir, and the hall's ceiling is thatched with golden shields. Various creatures live around Valhalla, such as the stag Eikþyrnir and the goat Heiðrún, both described as standing atop Valhalla and consuming the foliage of the tree Læraðr.Valhalla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, also written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, and in stanzas of an anonymous 10th century poem commemorating the death of Eric Bloodaxe known as Eiríksmál as compiled in Fagrskinna   more
1 vote
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6

Brasil

Brasil, also known as Hy-Brasil or several other variants, is a phantom island which was said to lie in the Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland. In Irish myths it was said to be cloaked in mist, except for one day every seven years, when it became visibl... e but still could not be reached. It probably has similar roots to other mythical islands said to exist in the Atlantic, such as Atlantis, Saint Brendan's Island, and the Isle of Mam   more
1 vote
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7

Mount Penglai

Penglai is a legendary land of Chinese mythology. It is known in Japanese mythology as Hōrai. In Chinese mythology, the mountain is often said to be the base for the Eight Immortals, or at least where they travel to have a banquet, as well as the ma... gician Anqi Sheng. Supposedly, everything on the mountain seems white, while its palaces are made from gold and platinum, and jewelry grows on trees. The presentation of Mt. Hōrai in Lafcadio Hearn's Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things, is somewhat different from the earlier idyllic Chinese myth. This version, which does not truly represent the Japanese views of Horai in the Meiji and preceding Tokugawa periods, rejects much of the fantastic and magical properties of Hōrai. In this version of the myth, Hōrai is not free from sorrow or death, and the winters are bitterly cold. Hearn's conception of Hōrai holds that there are no magical fruits that cure disease, grant eternal youth or raise the dead, and no rice bowls or wine glasses that never become empty   more
1 vote
1 comment
8

El Dorado

El Dorado, originally El Hombre Dorado, El Indio Dorado, or El Rey Dorado, is the term used by Europeans to describe a tribal chief of the Muisca native people of Colombia, South America, who as an initiation rite, covered himself with gold dust and...  dived into Lake Guatavita. Imagined as a place, El Dorado went from a city to a kingdom and an empire of this legendary golden king. In pursuit of the legend, Spanish conquistadors Francisco Orellana and Gonzalo Pizarro departed from Quito in 1541 in an expedition towards the Amazon Basin, as a result of which Orellana became the first known person to navigate the entire length of the Amazon River.El Dorado or Eldorado is now the name of numerous places, especially mining towns, in South America, the United States and elsewhere, as well as the name of many films and TV shows, pieces of music, sports teams, and other items   more
1 vote
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9

Mount Olympus

Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in Greece and the second highest mountain in the Balkans. It is located in the Olympus Range on the border between Thessaly and Macedonia, between the regional units of Pieria and Larissa, about 80 km southwest ... from Thessaloniki. Mount Olympus has 52 peaks, deep gorges, and exceptional biodiversity. The highest peak Mytikas, meaning "nose", rises to 2,919 metres. It is one of the highest peaks in Europe in terms of topographic prominence.Olympus was notable in Ancient Greek Mythology as the home of the Twelve Olympians, on the Mytikas peak. Mount Olympus is also noted for its very rich flora with several species. It has been the first National Park of Greece, since 1938, and a World's Biosphere Reserve.Every year thousands of people visit Olympus to admire its nature, to tour its slopes, and reach its peaks. Organized mountain refuges and various mountaineering and climbing routes are available to visitors, who want to explore its nature   more
1 vote
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10

Elysium

Elysium or the Elysian Fields is a conception of the afterlife that developed over time and was maintained by certain Greek religious and philosophical sects and cults. Initially separate from the realm of Hades, admission was reserved for mortals r... elated to the gods and other heroes. Later, it expanded to include those chosen by the gods, the righteous, and the heroic, where they would remain after death, to live a blessed and happy life, and indulging in whatever employment they had enjoyed in life.The Elysian Fields were, according to Homer, located on the western edge of the Earth by the stream of Okeanos. In the time of the Greek oral poet Hesiod, Elysium would also be known as the Fortunate Isles or the Isles of the Blessed, located in the western ocean at the end of the earth. The Isles of the Blessed would be reduced to a single island by the Thebean poet Pindar, describing it as having shady parks, with residents indulging their athletic and musical pastimes.The ruler of Elysium varies from author to author: Pindar and Hesiod name Cronus as the ruler, while the poet Homer in the Odyssey describes fair-haired Rhadamanthus dwelling there   more
1 vote
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11

La Ciudad Blanca

La Ciudad Blanca is a legendary settlement said to be located in the Mosquitia region of eastern Honduras. This extensive area of virgin rainforest has been the object of study for many people. Archaeologists refer to it as the Isthmo-Colombian Area...  of the Americas. Due to the many variants of the story as well as the lack of correspondence with current knowledge of the region, most professional archaeologists doubt it refers to an actual city of the Pre-Columbian era.Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés reported hearing "trustworthy" information on a region with "towns and villages" of extreme wealth in Honduras, but never located these. In 1927, aviator Charles Lindbergh reported seeing a "white city" while flying over eastern Honduras. By the 1930s, there were rumors of a place in Honduras called the "City of the Monkey God" and in 1940 adventurer Theodore Morde claimed to have found it. However, he never provided a precise location for the site, one that later sources equated with Ciudad Blanca. Morde died before returning to the region to undertake further exploration. Explorer Tibor Sekelj searched for The White City in 1952   more
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12

Islands of the Blessed

In the Fortunate Isles, also called the Isles of the Blessed, heroes and other favored mortals in Greek mythology and Celtic mythology were received by the gods into a winterless blissful paradise. According to Greek mythology, the islands were rese... rved for those who had chosen to be reincarnated thrice, and managed to be judged as especially pure enough to gain entrance to the Elysian Fields all three times. These islands were thought to lie in the Western Ocean near the encircling River Oceanus; Madeira, Canary Islands, Azores, Cape Verde and Bermuda have sometimes been cited as possible matches.Flavius Philostratus' Life of Apollonius of Tyana says, "And they also say that the Islands of the Blessed are to be fixed by the limits of Libya where they rise towards the uninhabited promontory." In this geography Libya was considered to extend westwards through Mauretania "as far as the mouth of the river Salex, some nine hundred stadia, and beyond that point a further distance which no one can compute, because when you have passed this river Libya is a desert which no longer supports a population.   more
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13

Jötunheimr

Jötunheimr is one of the Nine Worlds and the homeland of the Giants of Norse Mythology — Rock Giants and Frost Giants.
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14

Garden of the Hesperides

In Greek mythology, the Hesperides are nymphs who tend a blissful garden in a far western corner of the world, located near the neighbourhood of Cyrene or Benghazi in Libya or the Atlas mountains in North Africa at the edge of the encircling Oceanus... , the world-ocean. The nymphs are said to be the daughters of Hesperus.According to the Sicilian Greek poet Stesichorus, in his poem the "Song of Geryon", and the Greek geographer Strabo, in his book Geographika, the garden of the Hesperides is located in Tartessos, a location placed in the south of the Iberian peninsula.By Ancient Roman times, the garden of the Hesperides had lost its archaic place in religion and had dwindled to a poetic convention, in which form it was revived in Renaissance poetry, to refer both to the garden and to the nymphs that dwelt there   more
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15

Lake Parime

Lake Parime is a legendary lake located in South America. Sir Walter Raleigh began the exploration of the Guianas in earnest in 1594 and described the city of El Dorado as being located on Lake Parime far up the Orinoco River in Venezuela. Much of h... is exploration is documented in his books The Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana, published first in 1596, and The Discovery of Guiana, and the Journal of the Second Voyage Thereto, published in 1606. And Alexander von Humboldt. The lake was printed on maps in the 17th century up until the 19th century. It was believed to be somewhere in Guiana for several years. Then later naturalists as Alexander Humboldt and Bonpland as cartographers like Robert Schomburgk and Van Huevel moved the lake more to the southeast of the Orinoco River and north of the Amazon river, often being situated south of the mountains that border Venezuela, Guiana, and Brazil. However explorers were unable to find the magical and mythical lake, and so they declared the lake as being imaginary   more
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16

Kingdom of Saguenay

The name "Kingdom of Saguenay" supposedly has its origin in an Iroquoian legend, as recorded by the French during French colonization in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. According to the Iroquoian Indians, there was a kingdom to the north, o... f blond men rich with gold and furs, in a place they called Saguenay.Jacques Cartier first described finding the Saguenay River on his second voyage in 1536; he had with him Chief Donnacona's sons who told him it was the way to the Kingdom of Saguenay. While imprisoned in France in the 1530s, Donnacona himself also told stories about it, claiming it had great mines of silver and gold. French explorers in Canada looked for this kingdom in vain. Today, it is typically understood to be entirely mythical, a European misunderstanding, or an Iroquoian attempt to trick or confuse the French. However, some people have speculated it was an ancient, pre-Columbian European settlement to which the Iroquoian oral tradition referred, such as the Norse settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows.The name Saguenay survived in many modern placenames   more
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17

Lyonesse

Lyonesse is a country in Arthurian legend, particularly in the story of Tristan and Iseult. Said to border Cornwall, it is most notable as the home of the hero Tristan, whose father was king. In later traditions Lyonesse is said to have sunk beneath...  the waves some time after the Tristan stories take place, making it similar to Ys and other lost lands in medieval Celtic tales, and perhaps connecting it with the Isles of Scilly   more
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18

Hel

In Norse mythology, Hel is a being who presides over a realm of the same name, where she receives a portion of the dead. Hel is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written i... n the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In addition, she is mentioned in poems recorded in Heimskringla and Egils saga that date from the 9th and 10th centuries, respectively. An episode in the Latin work Gesta Danorum, written in the 12th century by Saxo Grammaticus, is generally considered to refer to Hel, and Hel may appear on various Migration Period bracteates.In the Poetic Edda, Prose Edda, and Heimskringla, Hel is referred to as a daughter of Loki, and to "go to Hel" is to die. In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, Hel is described as having been appointed by the god Odin as ruler of a realm of the same name, located in Niflheim. In the same source, her appearance is described as half black and half flesh-coloured and further as having a gloomy, downcast appearance   more
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19

Meropis

Meropis is a fictional island mentioned by ancient Greek writer Theopompus of Chios in his work "Philippica", which is only fragmentarily maintained via Aelian.
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20

Mag Mell

In Irish mythology, Mag Mell was a mythical realm achievable through death and/or glory. Unlike the underworld in some mythologies, Mag Mell was a pleasurable paradise, identified as either an island far to the west of Ireland or a kingdom beneath t... he ocean. However, Mag Mell was similar to the fields of Elysium in Greek mythology, and like the fields of Elysium, was accessible only to a select few. Furthermore, Mag Mell, like the numerous other mystical islands said to be off the coast of Ireland, was never explicitly stated in any surviving mythological account to be an afterlife. Rather, it is usually portrayed as a paradisal location populated by deities, which is occasionally visited by some adventurous mortals. In its island guise it was visited by various Irish heroes and monks forming the basis of the Adventure Myth or "echtrae" as defined by Myles Dillon in his book Early Irish Literature. This otherworld is a place where sickness and death do not exist. It is a place of eternal youth and beauty. Here, music, strength, life and all pleasurable pursuits come together in a single place. Here happiness lasts forever, no one wants for food or drink   more
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21

Lemuria

Lemuria is the name of a hypothetical "lost land" variously located in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The concept's 19th-century origins lie in attempts to account for discontinuities in biogeography; however, the concept of Lemuria has been rendere... d obsolete by modern theories of plate tectonics. Although sunken continents do exist – like Zealandia in the Pacific as well as Mauritia and the Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian Ocean – there is no known geological formation under the Indian or Pacific Oceans that corresponds to the hypothetical Lemuria   more
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22

Irkalla

In Babylonian mythology, Irkalla is the underworld from which there is no return. It is also called Arali, Kigal, Gizal, and the lower world. Irkalla is ruled by the goddess Ereshkigal and her consort, the death god Nergal.Irkalla was originally ano... ther name for Ereshkigal, who ruled the underworld alone until Nergal was sent to the underworld and seduced Ereshkigal. Both the deity and the location were called Irkalla, much like how Hades in Greek mythology is both the name of the underworld and the god who ruled it.The Sumerian netherworld was a place for the bodies of the dead to exist after death. One passed through the seven gates on their journey through the portal to the netherworld leaving articles of clothing and adornment at each gate, not necessarily by choice as there was a guardian at each gate to extract a toll for one's passage and to keep one from going the wrong way. The living spirits of the dead are only spoken of in connection with this netherworld when someone has been placed here before they are dead or wrongly killed and can be saved. The bodies of the dead decompose in this afterlife, as they would in the world above   more
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23

Nibiru

Nibiru is a term in the Akkadian language, translating to "crossing" or "point of transition", especially of rivers, i.e. river crossings or ferry-boats. In Babylonian astronomy, Nibiru is a term of the highest point of the ecliptic, i.e. the point ... of summer solstice, and its associated constellation.As the highest point in the paths of the planets, Nibiru was considered the seat of the summus deus who pastures the stars like sheep, in Babylon identified with Marduk. The establishment of the nibiru point is described in tablet 5 of the creation epic Enûma Eliš; “When Marduk fixed the locations of Nibiru, Enlil and Ea in the sky". The Enuma Elish states:Nibiru is [Marduk's] star, which he made appear in the heavens... [130-131] The stars of heaven, let him [Nibiru] set their course; let him shepherd all the gods like sheep.This interpretation of Marduk as the ruler of the cosmos has been suggested by some authors to imply an early monotheist tendency in Babylonian religion.Nibiru is described more closely on a complete cuneiform tablet   more
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24

Paititi

Paititi is a legendary Inca lost city or utopian rich land. It allegedly lies east of the Andes, hidden somewhere within the remote rainforests of southeast Peru, northern Bolivia or southwest Brazil. The Paititi legend in Peru revolves around the s... tory of the culture-hero Inkarri, who, after he had founded Q'ero and Cusco, retreated toward the jungles of Pantiacolla to live out the rest of his days in his refuge city of Paititi. Other versions of the legend see Paititi as an Inca refuge in the border area between Bolivia and Brazil   more
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25

Axis mundi

The axis mundi, in religion or mythology, is the world center or the connection between Heaven and Earth. As the celestial pole and geographic pole, it expresses a point of connection between sky and earth where the four compass directions meet. At ... this point travel and correspondence is made between higher and lower realms. Communication from lower realms may ascend to higher ones and blessings from higher realms may descend to lower ones and be disseminated to all. The spot functions as the omphalos, the world's point of beginning.The image is mostly viewed as feminine, as it relates to the center of the earth. It may have the form of a natural object or a product of human manufacture. Its proximity to heaven may carry implications that are chiefly religious or secular. The image appears in religious and secular contexts. The axis mundi symbol may be found in cultures utilizing shamanic practices or animist belief systems, in major world religions, and in technologically advanced "urban centers". In Mircea Eliade's opinion, "Every Microcosm, every inhabited region, has a Centre; that is to say, a place that is sacred above all." The axis mundi is often associated with mandalas   more
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26

Ayotha Amirtha Gangai

The Ayotha Amirtha Gangai is a mythical river found in Akilattirattu Ammanai the source of Ayyavazhi mythology. It was located in Ayotha Amirtha Vanam, the place where Thirumal, through the instrumentality of the Seven Virgins, give birth to the San... tror Makkal. The land is surrounded by Sri Rangam in the north, Mount Thirikonam in the south, Puttaapuram in the east and by Poonkavu in the west   more
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27

Aztlán

Aztlán is the legendary ancestral home of the Aztec peoples. Aztecah is the Nahuatl word for "people from Aztlan". The place Aztlan is mentioned in several ethnohistorical sources dating from the colonial period, and each of them give different list... s of the different tribal groups who participated in the migration from Aztlan to central Mexico, but the Mexica who went on to found Mexico-Tenochtitlan are mentioned in all of the accounts. Historians have speculated about the possible location of Aztlan and tend to place it either in northwestern Mexico or the southwest US, although there are significant doubts about whether the place is purely mythical or represent a historical reality   more
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28

Agartha

Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary city that is said to be located in the Earth's core. It is related to the belief in a hollow Earth and is a popular subject in esotericism.
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29

Álfheimr

Alfheim, also called Ljosalfheim, is one of the Nine Worlds and home of the Light Elves in Norse mythology.
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30

Annwn

Annwn was the Otherworld in Welsh mythology. Ruled by Arawn, it was essentially a world of delights and eternal youth where disease was absent and food was ever-abundant. It became identified with the Christian afterlife in paradise.
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31

Asgard

In Norse religion, Asgard is one of the Nine Worlds and home to the Æsir tribe of gods. It is surrounded by an incomplete wall attributed to a Hrimthurs riding the stallion Svaðilfari, according to Gylfaginning. Odin and his wife, Frigg, are the rul... ers of Asgard.One of Asgard's well known locations is Valhalla, in which Odin rules   more
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32

Asphodel Meadows

The Asphodel Meadows is a section of the Ancient Greek underworld where ordinary souls were sent to live after death.
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33

Nysa

In Greek mythology, the mountainous district of Nysa, variously associated with Ethiopia, Libya, Tribalia, India or Arabia by Greek mythographers, was the traditional place where the rain nymphs, the Hyades, raised the infant god Dionysus, the "Zeus...  of Nysa". Though the worship of Dionysus came into mainland Greece from Asia Minor, the locations of the mythical Nysa may simply be conventions to show that a magically distant chthonic land of myth was intended. The name Nysa may even be an invention to explain the god's name. Even Homer mentions the mountain Nyseion as the place where Dionysus, under the protection of the nymphs, grew up. Hesychius of Alexandria gives a list of the following locations proposed by ancient authors as the site of Mount Nysa: Arabia, Ethiopia, Egypt, Babylon, Erythraian Sea, Thrace, Thessaly, Cilicia, India, Libya, Lydia, Macedonia, Naxos, around Pangaios, Syria. On his return from Nysa to join his fellow Olympians, Dionysus brought the entheogen wine   more
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34

Hawaiki

In Māori mythology, Hawaiki is the original home of the Māori, before they travelled across the sea to New Zealand. It also features as the underworld in many Māori stories.
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35

Pandæmonium

Pandæmonium is the capital of Hell in John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost."Pandæmonium" stems from Greek "παν", meaning "all" or "every", and "δαιμόνιον", meaning "little spirit", "little angel", or, as Christians interpreted it, "little daemon", ... and later, "demon". It thus roughly translates as "All Demons", but can also be interpreted as Παν-δαιμον-ειον, "all-demon-place".John Milton invented the name for the capital of Hell, "the High Capital, of Satan and his Peers", built by the fallen angels at the suggestion of Mammon at the end of Book I of Paradise Lost. It was designed by the architect Mulciber, who had been the designer of palaces in Heaven before his fall. Book II begins with the debate among the "Stygian Council" in the council-chamber of Pandæmonium. The demons built it in about an hour, but it far surpassed all human palaces or dwellings; it may have been small, however, as the demons are described as shrinking from their titanic size in order to fit in   more
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36

Thule

Thule, also spelled Thula, Thila, or Thyïlea, is, in classical European literature and maps, a region in the far north. Though often considered to be an island in antiquity, modern interpretations of what was meant by Thule often identify it as Norw... ay, an identification supported by modern calculations. Other interpretations include Orkney, Shetland, and Scandinavia. In the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance, Thule was often identified as Iceland or Greenland. Another suggested location is Saaremaa in the Baltic Sea. The term ultima Thule in medieval geographies denotes any distant place located beyond the "borders of the known world". Sometimes it is used as a proper noun as the Latin name for Greenland when Thule is used for Iceland   more
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37

Svartálfaheimr

In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "swart(hy) elves" or "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves"). Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily atte... sted in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves")   more
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38

Sierra de la Plata

The Sierra de la Plata was a mythical source of silver in the interior of South America. The legend began in the early 16th century when castaways from the Juan Díaz de Solís expedition heard indigenous stories of a mountain of silver in an inland r... egion ruled by the so-called White King. The first European to lead an expedition in search of it was the castaway Aleixo Garcia, who crossed nearly the entire continent to reach the Andean altiplano. On his way back to the coast, Garcia died in an indigenous ambush in Paraguay, but survivors brought precious metals back to corroborate their story. The legend inspired other expeditions, all of which ended in failure.The Río de la Plata and the modern country of Argentina both take their names from the myth. The legend of the Sierra de la Plata may have been based on the Cerro Rico de Potosí in Bolivia, which was discovered by a Spanish expedition traveling from Peru in 1545   more
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39

Shambhala

In Tibetan Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Shambhala is a kingdom hidden somewhere in Inner Asia. It is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalachakra Tantra and the ancient texts of the Zhang Zhung culture which predated Tibetan Buddhi... sm in western Tibet. The Bön scriptures speak of a closely related land called Olmolungring.Hindu texts such as Vishnu Purana mention the village Shambhala as the birthplace of Kalki, the final incarnation of Vishnu who will usher in a new Golden Age.Whatever its historical basis, Shambhala gradually came to be seen as a Buddhist Pure Land, a fabulous kingdom whose reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic. It was in this form that the Shambhala myth reached the Western Europe and the Americas, where it influenced non-Buddhist as well as Buddhist spiritual seekers — and, to some extent, popular culture in general   more
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40

Tartarus

Tartarus, in ancient Greek mythology, is the deep abyss that is used as a dungeon of torment and suffering for the wicked and as the prison for the Titans. As far below Hades as the earth is below the heavens, Tartarus is the place where, according ... to Plato in Gorgias, souls were judged after death and where the wicked received punishment. Like other primal entities, Tartarus was also considered to be a primordial force or deity   more
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41

Ys

Ys, also spelled Is or Kêr-Is in Breton, and Ville d'Ys in French, is a mythical city that was built on the coast of Brittany and later swallowed by the ocean. Most versions of the legend place the city in the Douarnenez Bay.
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42

Quivira and Cíbola

Quivira is a place first mentioned by Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1541, who visited it during his searches for the mythical "Seven Cities of Jade". The location and identity of Quivira is believed by most authorities to be in central Kansas. Th... e Quivirans are believed to have been Wichita or another Caddoan tribe   more
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43

Mictlan

Mictlan was the underworld of Aztec mythology. Most people who died went to Mictlan, although other possibilities existed. Mictlan, far to the north, consisted of nine distinct levels.The journey from the first level to the ninth was difficult and t... ook 4 years, but the dead were aided by the psychopomp, Xolotl. The dead had to pass many challenges, such as crossing a mountain range where the mountains crashed into each other, a field with wind that blew flesh-scraping knives, and a river of blood with fearsome jaguars.Mictlan was ruled by King Mictlantecuhtli and his wife, Mictecacihuatl.Other deities in Mictlan included Cihuacoatl, Acolmiztli, Chalmecacihuilt, Chalmecatl and Acolnahuacatl   more
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44

City of the Caesars

The City of the Caesars, also variously known as City of Patagonia, the Wandering City, Trapalanda or Trapananda, Lin Lin or Elelín, is a mythical city of South America. It was supposedly located somewhere in Patagonia, in a valley of the Andes betw... een Chile and Argentina. Despite being searched for during the colonization of South America, no evidence proves that it ever existed, although reports of it circulated for two hundred years. In 1766 a Jesuit, Father José García Alsue, explored the area now part of Queulat National Park in Aisén Region, Chile, searching unsuccessfully for the City of the Caesars   more
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45

Niflheim

Niflheim is one of the Nine Worlds and is a location in Norse mythology which overlaps with the notions of Niflhel and Hel. The name Niflheimr only appears in two extant sources, Gylfaginning and the much debated Hrafnagaldr Óðins.Niflheim was prima... rily a realm of primordial ice and cold, with nine frozen rivers. Two classes of legendary beings were often labeled by scholars as the inhabitants of Niflheim — the Hrímthursar, widely known as the Frost Giants of Norse legend; and the Niflungar, a race of treasure-hoarding spirits better remembered as the Nibelungs, the titular creatures in Richard Wagner's opera Der Ring des Nibelungen. According to Gylfaginning, Niflheim was one of the two primordial realms, the other one being Muspelheim, the realm of fire. Between these two realms of cold and heat, creation began when its waters mixed with the heat of Muspelheim to form a "creating steam". Later, it became the abode of Hel, a goddess daughter of Loki, and the afterlife for her subjects, those who did not die a heroic or notable death   more
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46

Mu

Mu is the name of a suggested lost continent whose concept and the name were proposed by 19th-century traveler and writer Augustus Le Plongeon, who claimed that several ancient civilizations, such as those of Egypt and Mesoamerica, were created by r... efugees from Mu—which he located in the Atlantic Ocean. This concept was popularized and expanded by James Churchward, who asserted that Mu was once located in the Pacific.The existence of Mu was disputed already in Le Plongeon's time. Today scientists dismiss the concept of Mu as physically impossible, arguing that a continent can neither sink nor be destroyed in the short period of time required by this premise. Mu is today considered to be a fictional place   more
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47

Hyperborea

In Greek mythology the Hyperboreans were mythical people who lived "beyond the North Wind". The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea indicates a region that lay far to the north of Thrace.Th... is land was supposed to be perfect, with the sun shining twenty-four hours a day, which to modern ears suggests a possible location within the Arctic Circle. However, it is also possible that Hyperborea had no real physical location at all, for according to the classical Greek poet Pindar,neither by ship nor on foot would you findthe marvellous road to the assembly of the Hyperboreans.Pindar also described the otherworldly perfection of the Hyperboreans:Never the Muse is absentfrom their ways: lyres clash and flutes cryand everywhere maiden choruses whirling.Neither disease nor bitter old age is mixedin their sacred blood; far from labor and battle they live   more
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48

Niflhel

Niflhel is the name of a location in Norse mythology which appears in the eddic poems Vafþrúðnismál and Baldrs draumar, and also in Snorri Sturluson's Gylfaginning. Niflhel overlaps with the notions of Niflheimr and Hel.
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49

Muspelheim

In Norse mythology, Muspelheim, also called Muspell, is a realm of fire. This realm is one of the Nine Worlds, ruled by Surtr with his consort Sinmara in some accounts. The denizens of Muspelheim were usually referred to as the eldjötnar in Norse tr... adition, though they were also identified by other epithets in Eddic poetry, such as the Múspellssynir and the Rjúfendr. Both of these terms sometimes described an entirely separate mythological species that dwelled alongside or in place of the eldjötnar within this fiery realm. Muspelheim is fire; and the land to the North, Niflheim, is ice. The two mixed and created water from the melting ice in Ginnungagap. The sun and the stars originate from Muspelheim.According to the Ragnarök prophecies in Snorri Sturluson's Gylfaginning, the first part of his Prose Edda, the sons of Muspell will break the Bifröst bridge, signaling the end of times:In the midst of this clash and din the heavens are rent in twain, and the sons of Muspell come riding through the opening. Surtr rides first, and before him and after him flames burning fire. He has a very good sword, which shines brighter than the sun   more
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50

Norumbega

Norumbega was a legendary settlement in northeastern North America, inextricably connected with attempts to demonstrate Viking incursions in New England.An early reference was that of the French navigator Jean Allefonsce who reported that he had coa... sted south from Newfoundland and had discovered a great river. "The river is more than 40 leagues wide at its entrance and retains its width some thirty or forty leagues. It is full of Islands, which stretch some ten or twelve leagues into the sea. ... Fifteen leagues within this river there is a town called Norombega, with clever inhabitants, who trade in furs of all sorts; the town folk are dressed in furs, wearing sable. ... The people use many words which sound like Latin. They worship the sun. They are tall and handsome in form. The land of Norombega lie high and is well situated."It often appeared on subsequent European maps of North America, lying south of Acadia somewhere in what is now New England. Norumbega was thought to be a large, rich Native city, and by extension the river it was on, and the region surrounding it   more
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51

Cockaigne

Cockaigne or Cockayne is a land of plenty in medieval myth, an imaginary place of extreme luxury and ease where physical comforts and pleasures are always immediately at hand and where the harshness of medieval peasant life does not exist. Specifica... lly, in poems like The Land of Cockaigne, Cockaigne is a land of contraries, where all the restrictions of society are defied, sexual liberty is open, and food is plentiful. Writing about Cockaigne was a commonplace of Goliard verse. It represented both wish fulfillment and resentment at the strictures of asceticism and dearth   more
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52

Themiscyra

Themiscyra, less commonly Themiskyra, was an ancient Greek town on the Themiscyra plain a little distance from the coast and near the mouth of the Thermodon. It was the semi-legendary home of the Amazons.The town is mentioned as early as the time of...  Herodotus who also mentions the Amazon female warriors from Themiscyra.Ptolemy is undoubtedly mistaken in placing it further west, midway between the Iris and Cape Heraclium. Scylax calls it a Greek town; but Diodorus states that it was built by the founder of the kingdom of the Amazons. After the retreat of Mithridates VI from Cyzicus, Themiscyra was besieged by Lucullus. The inhabitants on that occasion defended themselves with great valor; and when their walls were undermined, they sent bears and other wild beasts, and even swarms of bees, against the workmen of Lucullus. But notwithstanding their gallant defence, the town seems to have perished on that occasion, for Mela speaks of it as no longer existing, and Strabo does not mention it at all   more
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53

Westernesse

Westernesse is a fictional kingdom in the Middle English romance of King Horn. It has been associated with various regions in the British Isles, among which are Isle of Man and the Wirral district in Cheshire.Whether or not Westernesse should be ide... ntified with one or more real-world locations remains, however, a point of dispute, since the narrative contains little geographic detail, and only vaguely echoes historical events.In King Horn, Westernesse can be reached by sea, and is ruled by King Almair. The throne eventually passes to Arnoldin, who is a loyal companion of the narrative's hero, Horn.Many people today know 'Westernesse' as J. R. R. Tolkien's translation of Númenor, the name which he gave to one of the realms in his fictional world of Middle-earth. In one of his letters, Tolkien indicated that he had derived his translation from the name as it occurred in King Horn   more
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54

The Summerland

The name given by Theosophists, Wiccans and some earth-based contemporary pagan religions to their conceptualization of an (mostly pastoral) afterlife.
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55

Takama-ga-hara

Takama-ga-hara is a place in Japanese mythology. In Shinto, Takama-ga-hara is the dwelling place of the kami. It is believed to be connected to the Earth by the bridge Ama-no uki-hashi.In Shinto, ame is a lofty, sacred world, the home of the amatsuk... ami. Some scholars have attempted to explain the myth of descent of the gods from the Takama-ga-hara as an allegory of the migration of peoples. However, it is likely to have referred from the beginning to a higher world in a religious sense. A Shinto myth explains that at the time of creation, light, pure elements branched off to become heaven. Heavy, turbid elements branched off to become earth. Ame became the home of the amatsukami or gods of heaven, while tsuchi became the home of kunitsukami or gods of the land. The amatsukami are said to have descended from heaven to pacify and perfect this world   more
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56

Xibalba

Xibalba, roughly translated as "place of fear", is the name of the underworld in K'iche' Maya mythology, ruled by the Maya death gods and their helpers. In 16th-century Verapaz, the entrance to Xibalba was traditionally held to be a cave in the vici... nity of Cobán, Guatemala. According to some of the K'iche' Maya presently living in the vicinity, the area is still associated with death. Cave systems in nearby Belize have also been referred to as the entrance to Xibalba. In some Maya areas, the Milky Way is viewed as the road to Xibalba   more
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57

Scholomance

The Scholomance was fabled to be a legendary school of black magic run by the Devil, supposedly located near an unnamed lake in the mountains south of the city of Hermannstadt in Transylvania.
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58

Yomi

Yomi or Yomi-no-kuni is the Japanese word for the land of the dead. According to Shinto mythology as related in Kojiki, this is where the dead go after life. Once one has eaten at the hearth of Yomi it is impossible to return to the land of the livi... ng. Yomi is comparable to Hades or hell and is most commonly known for Izanami's retreat to that place after her death. Izanagi followed her there and upon his return he washed himself, creating Amaterasu, Susanoo, and Tsukuyomi-no-Mikoto in the process.This realm of the dead seems to have geographical continuity with this world and certainly cannot be thought of as a paradise to which one would aspire, nor can it appropriately be described as a hell in which one suffers retribution for past deeds; rather, all deceased carry on a gloomy and shadowy existence in perpetuity regardless of their behavior in life. Many scholars believe that the image of Yomi was derived from ancient Japanese tombs in which corpses were left for some time to decompose   more
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59

Brittia

Brittia according to Procopius was an island he considered to be known to the inhabitants of the Low Countries under Frankish rule, corresponding both to a real island used for burial and a mythological Isle of the Blessed, to which the souls of the...  dead are transported.Procopius's Brittia lies no farther than 200 stadia from the mainland, opposite the mouth of the Rhine but between the islands of Brettania and legendary Thule, and three nations live in it, Angiloi, Phrissones and Brittones, that is, Angles, Frisians and Britons. Procopius mentions a wall in Brittia, which he distinguishes from Bretannia, however, and fertile lands. Brittia thus corresponds to the island of Great Britain. "It is perhaps only the apparently authentic combinations of names, Angles, Frisians and Britons, which demands hard attention to this interlude in serious Byzantine discussions of the Gothic wars," H. R. Loyn warns.The rest is purely fantastic: Procopius relates that"They imagine that the souls of the dead are transported to that island   more
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60

Camelot

Camelot is a castle and court associated with the legendary King Arthur. Absent in the early Arthurian material, Camelot first appeared in 12th-century French romances and eventually came to be described as the fantastic capital of Arthur's realm an... d a symbol of the Arthurian world. The stories locate it somewhere in Great Britain and sometimes associate it with real cities, though more usually its precise location is not revealed. Most scholars regard it as being entirely fictional, its geography being perfect for romance writers; Arthurian scholar Norris J. Lacy commented that "Camelot, located no where in particular, can be anywhere". Nevertheless arguments about the location of the "real Camelot" have occurred since the 15th century and continue to rage today in popular works and for tourism purposes   more
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61

Kyöpelinvuori

Kyöpelinvuori, in Finnish mythology, is the place which dead women haunt. It is rumoured that virgins who die young gather there after their death at the start of their afterlife. It corresponds to Blockula of Swedish mythology.Kyöpelinvuori is also...  well known in Finland due to Easter: it is said to be the ancient home of mountain witches who fly on brooms with black cats. The witches leave the area only during Easter in order to spook children. These witches have also been humorously referred to be spinsters who will end up there in order to escape from the "old maid" tax.In the Far Northern Land fantasy novels by American author David Schlaefer, Kyöpelinvuori is the home of a Seer who uses a crystal ball to see far away people and places.According to the National Land Survey of Finland, there is a total number of 32 Kyöpelinvuori hills in Finland   more
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62

Shangri-La

Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton. Hilton describes Shangri-La as a mystical, harmonious valley, gently guided from a lamasery, enclosed in the western end of the Kunlun Mountains... . Shangri-La has become synonymous with any earthly paradise, and particularly a mythical Himalayan utopia – a permanently happy land, isolated from the outside world. In the novel Lost Horizon, the people who live at Shangri-La are almost immortal, living years beyond the normal lifespan and only very slowly aging in appearance. The word also evokes the imagery of exoticism of the Orient. In the ancient Tibetan scriptures, existence of seven such places is mentioned as Nghe-Beyul Khembalung. Khembalung is one of several beyuls believed to have been created by Padmasambhava in the 8th century as idyllic, sacred places of refuge for Buddhists during times of strife.Some scholars believe that the Shangri-La story owes a literary debt to Shambhala, a mythical kingdom in Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which was sought by Eastern and Western explorers   more
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63

Sodom and Gomorrah

Sodom and Gomorrah were cities mentioned in the Book of Genesis and throughout the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament and in deuterocanonical sources, as well as in the Qur'an.According to the Torah, the kingdoms of Sodom and Gomorrah were allied with ... the cities of Admah, Zeboim and Bela. These five cities, also known as the "cities of the plain", were situated on the Jordan River plain in the southern region of the land of Canaan. The plain, which corresponds to the area just north of the modern-day Dead Sea, was compared to the garden of Eden as being a land well-watered and green, suitable for grazing livestock.Divine judgment by God was then passed upon Sodom and Gomorrah and two neighboring cities, which were completely consumed by fire and brimstone. Neighboring Zoar was the only city to be spared. In Abrahamic religions, Sodom and Gomorrah have become synonymous with impenitent sin, and their fall with a proverbial manifestation of divine retribution. Sodom and Gomorrah have been used as metaphors for vice and homosexuality viewed as a deviation   more
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64

Bjarmaland

Bjarmaland was a territory mentioned in Norse sagas up to the Viking Age and - beyond - in geographical accounts until the 16th century. The term is usually seen to have referred to the southern shores of the White Sea and the basin of the Northern ... Dvina River and - presumably - some of the surrounding areas. Today, these territories comprise a part of the Arkhangelsk Oblast of Russia.In the account of the Viking adventurer Ottar who visited Bjarmaland in the end of the 9th century AD, the term "Beorm" is used for the people of Bjarmaland. According to the account, "Beormas" spoke a language related to that of the Sami people, and lived in an area of the White Sea region.Accordingly, many historians assume the terms beorm and bjarm to derive from the Uralic word perm, which refers to "travelling merchants" and represents the Old Permic culture. However, some linguists consider this theory to be speculative.The recent research on the Uralic substrate in northern Russian dialects suggests that several other Uralic groups besides the Permians lived in Bjarmaland, assumed to have included the Viena Karelians, Sami and Kvens   more
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65

Brahmapura

In Hinduism, Brahmapura is the abode of Brahma, one of the three Trimurti. It is located on Mount Meru. It is also referred to as Brahmaloka or Satyaloka in all of the puranas. Brahmapura is the topmost loka within this material universe.
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Diqiucun_Cunmin says2015-04-26T00:25:53.2845373-05:00
Could you add Penglai?
PetersSmith says2015-04-26T00:35:02.1215165-05:00
You mean Mount Penglai?
SamStevens says2015-04-26T02:09:35.8807660-05:00
PetersSmith: May you list the reasons as to why you did not add heaven, purgatory, and hell as answer choices to this poll?
Diqiucun_Cunmin says2015-04-26T02:40:19.0962826-05:00
Yeah.
Diqiucun_Cunmin says2015-04-26T02:42:41.7625008-05:00
@Sam: Those places have origins in scripture and thus many would be offended by the suggestion that they are mythological.
Heraclitus says2015-04-27T07:21:14.2414440-05:00
Camelot was probably a real place. Same with Atlantis and Avalon. And others of these actually refer to factual places like Hypeborea which was northern europe although it wasn't so ellaborate as the myths say.

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