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12 Total Votes
1

Filet mignon

Filet mignon is a steak cut of beef taken from the smaller end of the tenderloin, or psoas major of the beef carcass, usually a steer or heifer. In French this cut can also be called filet de bœuf, which translates in English to beef fillet. When fo... und on a menu in France, filet mignon could also refer to pork rather than beef.The tenderloin runs along both sides of the spine, and is usually harvested as two long snake-shaped cuts of beef. The tenderloin is sometimes sold whole. When sliced along the short dimension, creating roughly round cuts, and tube cuts, the cuts from the small forward end are considered to be filet mignon. Those from the center are tournedos; however, some butchers in the United States label all types of tenderloin steaks "filet mignon." In fact, the shape of the true filet mignon may be a hindrance when cooking, so most restaurants sell steaks from the wider end of the tenderloin - it is both cheaper and much more presentable.The tenderloin is the most tender cut of beef and is also arguably the most desirable and therefore the most expensive. The average steer or heifer provides no more than 1.8-2.8 kg of it. Because the muscle is not weight-bearing, it contains less connective tissue, which makes it tender   more
6 votes
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2

Rib eye steak

The rib eye or ribeye, is a beef steak from the rib section. The rib section of beef spans from ribs six through twelve. Ribeye steaks are mostly composed of the Longissimus dorsi muscle but also contain the Complexus and Spinalis muscles.A rib stea... k is a beef steak sliced from the rib primal of a beef animal, with rib bone attached. In the United States, the term rib eye steak is used for a rib steak with the bone removed; however in some areas, and outside the U.S., the terms are often used interchangeably. The rib eye or "ribeye" was originally, as the name implies, the center best portion of the rib steak, without the bone.In Australia, "ribeye" is used when this cut is served with the bone in. With the bone removed, it is called "Scotch fillet".It is one of the more flavorful cuts of beef, due to the fact it comes from the upper rib cage area, which does not support much of the cow's weight, nor does it have to work hard or exercise. Its marbling of fat makes this very good for slow roasting and it also goes well on a grill cooked to any degree   more
3 votes
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3

Porterhouse steak

Porterhouse was an American Champion Thoroughbred racehorse.
2 votes
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4

New York strip steak

1 vote
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5

T-bone steak

The T-bone and porterhouse are steaks of beef cut from the short loin. Both steaks include a "T-shaped" bone with meat on each side. Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and thus include more tenderloin steak, along with a ... large strip steak. T-bone steaks are cut closer to the front, and contain a smaller section of tenderloin.There is little agreement among experts on how large the tenderloin must be to differentiate a T-bone steak from porterhouse. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications state that the tenderloin of a porterhouse must be at least 1.25 inches thick at its widest, while that of a T-bone must be at least 0.5 inches. However steaks with a large tenderloin are often called a "T-bone" in restaurants and steakhouses despite technically being porterhouse.Due to their large size and the fact that they contain meat from two of the most prized cuts of beef, T-bone steaks are generally considered one of the highest quality steaks, and prices at steakhouses are accordingly high. Porterhouse steaks are even more highly valued due to their larger tenderloin   more
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