Should schools teach morality courses alongside other required classes?

Posted by: GoodPoint

Vote
24 Total Votes
1

Yes, but without yes or no answers

The children should be asked to formulate their own beliefs on morality
15 votes
3 comments
2

No, children must learn for themselves

Children must be allowed to learn their morals naturally and on their own
7 votes
3 comments
3

No, morality belongs to the parents

Parents should decide what their kids are brought up to think and feel
2 votes
0 comments
4

Yes, and with definate guidelines

It's important for students to know social values, and what is regarded as right, and regarded as wrong.
0 votes
0 comments
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howardzinn says2014-04-11T20:25:19.8000424-05:00
Not morality courses; Philosophy courses, then the kid would learn to think complexly, analyze, think critically and be able to discern ideologies and ideas from intellectual information.
SNP1 says2014-04-11T20:36:05.9581680-05:00
No, morals are not objective, they are subjective. I think you mean ethics, but I would say that philosophy might be the better course of action. We do have to fix the philosophy courses though. Philosophy (at least where I am from) is completely biased with the way it is taught.
howardzinn says2014-04-11T20:45:37.4678315-05:00
SNP1 really? That is terrible! I love philosophy. I took morals, logic and ethics as one class, that is how it was set up. But what you said about Philosophy is true. I don't believe in moral absolutes, you?
SNP1 says2014-04-11T20:53:10.4323351-05:00
Moral absolutes is a silly idea.
michaeln23 says2014-04-12T11:26:30.5324285-05:00
I would go for yes in the sake of moral realism, and I believe that morality has definitive qualities. Like science, we place definitive values in order to agree and progress, and perhaps like morality there must be a universal moral code that most if not all beings can relate to. However, if morality is taught by the wrong hands, it may be the worst idea possible. Moral subjectivity is a contradictory belief and gives no hold to what is moral and unmoral itself and "cannot be reasoned to what is right or wrong because anyone can be right or wrong"
Diqiucun_Cunmin says2014-04-15T12:32:19.0239082-05:00
I'm thinking the middle ground between 'Yes, but without yes or no answers' and 'Yes, and with definate guidelines'. I think children should be guided to the correct values. They should not indoctrinated into blindly believing the values; at the same time, they should not be allowed to formulate their beliefs on their own.
WXL says2014-04-17T09:32:44.5268483-05:00
Why shouldn't they be allowed to formulate beliefs on their own. Are your beliefs, or societies beliefs (whichever one would be within the "guidelines") somehow superior to theirs, and why do you use that basis? Surely, people should have the freedom to decide their own beliefs (without any such "guidelines").
Diqiucun_Cunmin says2014-04-30T10:17:35.2160944-05:00
@WXL (I apologise for not replying earlier) 'Let careful attention be paid to education in schools, inculcating in it especially the filial and fraternal duties, and grey-haired men will not be seen upon the roads, carrying burdens on their backs or on their heads.' (Mencius 1.3) Everyone was born with a heart of benevolence, but as they age, their personalities and inclinations will change. 'By nature, men are nearly alike; by practice, they get to be wide apart.' (Analects 12.7) There are external forces that lead humans astray, and not follow their benevolent natures. 'Now by striking water and causing it to leap up, you may make it go over your forehead, and, by damming and leading it you may force it up a hill.' (Mencius 11.2) I am worried that children may be at the mercy of these forces if they are not guided to the right path. They should be taught to follow their innate benevolence, and not these forces (which trigger our animal desires BTW). 'What Heaven has conferred is called The Nature; an accordance with this nature is called The Path of duty; the regulation of this path is called Instruction.' (Doctrine of the Mean) Instruction should be in accordance with human nature, which 'heaven' (i.E. Mother Nature) has conferred upon us.

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